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What & how often do you grease / lube on YZ250 / YZ250X?


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I've read here and there about regular greasing and lubing on the YZ250 / YZ250X, as well as noted the recommendation in the manual (same manual for both bikes, see image), though I do not think it consolidates all of the grease and oil points into one checklist, hence this post. 

As a sort of newbie getting back into dirt bikes after a long time (as a kid I only fixed things after they broke), plus being new to the YZ250 platform, I'd appreciate any suggestions one what you grease or lube and how often (and maybe even with what product). 

Thanks!

Screen Shot 2018-01-17 at 10.25.51 PM.png

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Depending on the environment where you ride (dry vs humid, muddy vs desert), you'll need to grease all moving/pivoting points between once a year (dry climate) and every few rides (wet/muddy conditions). The linkage bearings suffer first, and they need to be cleaned and greased fairly often, followed by wheel bearings, swingarm bearings, brake pedal pivot, and steering bearings. The more often it's cleaned/greased, the longer it'll live

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As jamracing mentioned, grease servicing is usage dependent and rather than specific hours.

 

Also depends how careful you are if using a pressure washer.

Often bearings are damaged by forcing external contaminants past the seals. (dirt, sand, water etc.) 

 

Edited by mlatour
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23 hours ago, markmc2 said:

when y'all re-grease the wheel bearings, do you remove the rubber seal with a pick then pump fresh grease into them?

don't forget about the chain roller. it has a bearing too.

 

  • linkage bearings
  • wheel bearings
  • swing-arm bearings
  • brake pedal pivot
  • steering bearings
  • chain roller bearing

I pull the outer seal and clean them and regrease. Helps keep the water out. Wheel bearing really don't last long around here. Oem rear wheel spacers are the best since they have a cup that covers the seal.

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8 minutes ago, nickmell said:

I pull the outer seal and clean them and regrease. Helps keep the water out. Wheel bearing really don't last long around here. Oem rear wheel spacers are the best since they have a cup that covers the seal.

you do or do not put grease directly on the balls inside wheel bearing? it sounds like you are just packing grease on top of the assembled bearing to keep water out of that area.

 

 

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you do or do not put grease directly on the balls inside wheel bearing? it sounds like you are just packing grease on top of the assembled bearing to keep water out of that area.



 



 

remove the outer rubber seal, clean out the old grease, pack in New grease. Important not to completely fill the cavity
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If the steering bearing top seal on the YZ250 is similar to the late model YZ125 in design (very likely)

it is also prone to water contamination as by design there is very little seal lip 'tension' or pressure.

 

Comparatively my CRF250X sees much worst riding conditions (and more elaborate use of the pressure washer)

than my YZ but it's steering bearing grease always stays nice and clean.

 

 

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OEM linkage bearings are hard to service unless you remove the rubbery/plastic cage, clean them up with solvent, and re-pack with water proof grease. Swing arm gets the same cleaning but does not have the same rubbery/plastic cage. Main part is to keep the thrust bearings clean, and the seals greased to prevent water damage. Wheel bearings you do need to pull the wheel seals, and then carefully pull the bearing seal, clean with solvent, and inspect. For the price of new bearings, it is almost eaier to just replace every season on wheels. Always give the axle a slip of grease before you slid it in. Head bearings are pretty solid, and as long as you clean and re-grease, they are very hardy bearings. They will damage with to much moisture sitting in them, so pack the piss out of them. All pivot points (brake peddle, foot pegs, shifter, and the overlooked kick start) all need a little love from time to time. Then the transmission should get fresh oil every 10 hours minimum and less if you single track clutch a bunch. When the engine is out, I like to stuff a little grease in the mounting bolt holes on front and lower, and inside the swing arm bushings. 

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If the steering bearing top seal on the YZ250 is similar to the late model YZ125 in design (very likely)
it is also prone to water contamination as by design there is very little seal lip 'tension' or pressure.
 
Comparatively my CRF250X sees much worst riding conditions (and more elaborate use of the pressure washer)
than my YZ but it's steering bearing grease always stays nice and clean.
 
 

You can swap out the seal with an older yz250f part, seals much better
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Long-time yz owner here(200 hours a year)...the problem areas on mine were linkage, swingarm, and wheel bearings. I greased the linkage bearings a minimum of twice a year...even that wasn't enough during a wet winter. The big one about wheel bearings is using quality bearings and making sure the spacers are in good shape. If you have grooved spacers, the bearings are going to fail fairly quickly. I would also pull the dust covers off when new, flush out the crappy stock grease(resembles dielectric grease), pack it with Belray waterproof grease, and reassemble.

The steering-stem bearings were never an issue for me, I rarely even checked them.

Not really a maintenance item, but more of a repair issue, is the powervalve. The main-valve has a little nub that will break off...the shoulder that aligns the powervalve shaft almost completely worn off on mine, although that was after it had a crap-ton of hours on it.

As mentioned, change the gear oil at no more than 10 hours. Not to start an oil war, but I just ran cheap ATF because I changed it so often.

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