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Hello Everyone, 

I recently purchased a 2002 Honda cr250 two stroke. I am in the process of fixing somethings before riding season to make sure its ready to go. I have not rode a dirt bike since I owned a 70. I understand how to ride a manual and I did ride my friends late 80s four stroke 350 about a month ago once and I did pretty good considering not riding a manual before. I did stall a few times but I went through all the gears and went about 60mph on the road. That being said, he did say this cr250 is wicked compared to that bike. I was just wondering what you guys think and any tips for me?

Thanks in advance!  

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Wow. I thought that bike felt pretty fast. Well then I will have to just be careful :rolleyes:.

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I would add a 13 Oz flywheel go down to teeth on the rear sprocket learn to ride that way then if you wanted to change it and go back to having a monster machine you can always do it

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Hold on and have something ready to wipe the smile off your face.

 

Joking aside, the problem newer riders have with hard hitting bikes is whiskey throttle.  That's where the unexpected acceleration of the bike causes your weight to move back which causes you to pull more on the throttle which causes your weight to shift back which causes you to pull more on the throttle which results in some excellent video footage for the YouTube crash compilations.

If you want to avoid being featured on a YouTube crash compilation, there are somethings you can do so that you never experience whiskey throttle.  

Rule #1 - ALWAYS cover the clutch.  You should have one finger on the clutch lever at all times.  At the first hint of anything going wrong your first reaction should be to pull the clutch.  

Rule #2 - don't use the handlebars to hold on.  Handebars are there to allow you to steer, accelerate and brake.  They are not there to hold you on the bike.  You should be using your abs and back muscles to control your position on the bike.  When you accelerate you should simultaneously be using your abs and back muscles to push your torso forward in response to the acceleration and keep your body positioned where you want it.  Not only will this habit help you to avoid whiskey throttle it will also help you to avoid serious arm fatigue.

Doc

Edited by Doc_d
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5 minutes ago, levy1 said:

I would add a 13 Oz flywheel go down to teeth on the rear sprocket learn to ride that way then if you wanted to change it and go back to having a monster machine you can always do it

I actually bought a new kit. I will have to check what the specs are.

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16 minutes ago, Doc_d said:

Hold on and have something ready to wipe the smile off your face.

 

Joking aside, the problem newer riders have with hard hitting bikes is whiskey throttle.  That's where the unexpected acceleration of the bike causes your weight to move back which causes you to pull more on the throttle which causes your weight to shift back which causes you to pull more on the throttle which results in some excellent video footage for the YouTube crash compilations.

If you want to avoid being featured on a YouTube crash compilation, there are somethings you can do so that you never experience whiskey throttle.  

Rule #1 - ALWAYS cover the clutch.  You should have one finger on the clutch lever at all times.  At the first hint of anything going wrong your first reaction should be to pull the clutch.  

Rule #2 - don't use the handlebars to hold on.  Handebars are there to allow you to steer, accelerate and brake.  They are not there to hold you on the bike.  You should be using your abs and back muscles to control your position on the bike.  When you accelerate you should simultaneously be using your abs and back muscles to push your torso forward in response to the acceleration and keep your body positioned where you want it.  Not only will this habit help you to avoid whiskey throttle it will also help you to avoid serious arm fatigue.

Doc

I have seen many videos of whiskey throttle. When riding the 350 I was not use to the throttle response so I would just let off instead of pulling more. I could also just use the clutch if something bad happens. I was also going to have a two finger clutch lever. I have seen many videos of riders always having fingers on the clutch so thank you for that tip. Also thanks for the handle bar/body position tip. I never really paid any attention to how much i was gripping the handle bars. I will look out for this when I ride it.

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15 minutes ago, BabyGroot69 said:

I was not use to the throttle response so I would just let off instead of pulling more. 

In a true whiskey throttle event you will be physically unable to let off the throttle.  The force from the acceleration will make that impossible.  But you will still be able to pull the clutch which will stop the acceleration and allow you to roll off the throttle.

As noted proper body control will prevent this but if you ride long enough you'll probably have to use the clutch to save yourself at some point.  

Doc

 

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Where were you doc when I bought my first dirt bike at age 50 20 years ago. That wr400 drug me all over the woods and I just laid back on it and hold the throttle open not knowing what I was doing. Wish I would have had your information

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40 minutes ago, Doc_d said:

In a true whiskey throttle event you will be physically unable to let off the throttle.  The force from the acceleration will make that impossible.  But you will still be able to pull the clutch which will stop the acceleration and allow you to roll off the throttle.

As noted proper body control will prevent this but if you ride long enough you'll probably have to use the clutch to save yourself at some point.  

Doc

 

Well its just part of the learning experience that I will fall no doubt. Hopefully a true whiskey throttle experience doesn't happen. I will apply the body control once I am able to get on the bike. Hopefully soon. I appreciate your words of wisdom. Thanks.

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12 hours ago, BabyGroot69 said:

Hello Everyone, 

I recently purchased a 2002 Honda cr250 two stroke... I have not rode a dirt bike since I owned a 70...I was just wondering what you guys think and any tips for me?

That's a handful for sure and quite a jump!

Advice for you?

Proper riding gear...MX boots, pants with pads, knee protection, roost deflector, elbow and forearm protection, neck brace and a quality helmet with quality eye protection, etc.

And, don't sit on the back of the seat, ride the tank if you need to, to keep the front end down when desired. Learn to ride standing...its best to have the bulk of your weight on the foot pegs where it's intended to be.

Best of luck and enjoy!

Mossy :ride:

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11 hours ago, Oldmossyspokes said:

That's a handful for sure and quite a jump!

Advice for you?

Proper riding gear...MX boots, pants with pads, knee protection, roost deflector, elbow and forearm protection, neck brace and a quality helmet with quality eye protection, etc.

And, don't sit on the back of the seat, ride the tank if you need to, to keep the front end down when desired. Learn to ride standing...its best to have the bulk of your weight on the foot pegs where it's intended to be.

Best of luck and enjoy!

Mossy :ride:

It is quite the jump but I feel for my size it seems right. It will just take some practice is all. I heard for sand you want to lean back is this true or no?

I bought almost all the gear. I wasn't sure on the knee, elbow and forearm guards. I will look into that. All the gear I bought was oneal so I feel the quality should be good. Goggles are Oakley. 

10 hours ago, Oldmossyspokes said:

A few more things...

  • change the case oil often
  • buy stock in a rear tire manufacturer :cool:
  • get the suspension set up proper and keep it that way :ride:

 

Suspension is already set. I will have to change the oil and the tire the previous owner had has like a triangular design almost as if it will claw the dirt out.

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17 minutes ago, BabyGroot69 said:

 I heard for sand you want to lean back is this true or no?

Yes it's true, kind of:

I like riding sandy trail systems (not so much in dunes) when riding loose sand, especially where there are "whoops" (typical on trails) I find its best to keep up a good rate of speed and stand up with ones center of mass behind of the bikes center of mass...it keeps the front end light and improves control.

Not necessarily "lean back"...

This is where the line gets fuzzy between not using the bars to hold oneself on the bike and using the bars to help move ones weight back. When you get into a series of whoops you must keep the clutch covered and be ready for "Whiskey Throttle" events. I try to bring my weight more forward as I leave the ground off a whoop then reposition when landing to get the best traction and keep the front tire from sinking in to the inevitably loose sand after the whoop.

The best thing you can do for a bike rode in loose sand is add a steering stabilizer like a GPR or a Scott's...it improves steering control ten fold and reduces the incidence of unexpected "get offs" caused by unseen objects under the sand. 

The key to a powerful, responsive machine is throttle control...master the throttle and you master the bike. It can't go faster than allowed to by the human :cool:.

:ride: BRAAP!

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I just noticed you are in Michigan.  There is a company (VVMapping) that makes a book and a SD card with GPS maps on it for all of the Michigan trails.

Ambrose Lake is a good beginner trail.  If you are feeling confident you can take the MCCCT trail from Ambrose to Ogemah Hills.  That MCCCT trail is some nice single track.  Then when you are feeling really confident, Evart and Tomahawk are awesome trails.  There are tons of trails but that gives you some ideas.

Unfortunately being here in Michigan it's going to be a while before we are riding. 

Doc

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34 minutes ago, Doc_d said:

I just noticed you are in Michigan.  There is a company (VVMapping) that makes a book and a SD card with GPS maps on it for all of the Michigan trails.

Ambrose Lake is a good beginner trail.  If you are feeling confident you can take the MCCCT trail from Ambrose to Ogemah Hills.  That MCCCT trail is some nice single track.  Then when you are feeling really confident, Evart and Tomahawk are awesome trails.  There are tons of trails but that gives you some ideas.

Unfortunately being here in Michigan it's going to be a while before we are riding. 

Doc

Yeah unfortunately we have to deal with winter. I want to ride so bad. I will look up this product and those trails. My friend has a cabin I believe close to oscoda area and that is the only place I ever rode the trails when I was little. That little 70 in the sand trails sucked :rolleyes:. Thanks!

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40 minutes ago, Oldmossyspokes said:

Yes it's true, kind of:

I like riding sandy trail systems (not so much in dunes) when riding loose sand, especially where there are "whoops" (typical on trails) I find its best to keep up a good rate of speed and stand up with ones center of mass behind of the bikes center of mass...it keeps the front end light and improves control.

Not necessarily "lean back"...

This is where the line gets fuzzy between not using the bars to hold oneself on the bike and using the bars to help move ones weight back. When you get into a series of whoops you must keep the clutch covered and be ready for "Whiskey Throttle" events. I try to bring my weight more forward as I leave the ground off a whoop then reposition when landing to get the best traction and keep the front tire from sinking in to the inevitably loose sand after the whoop.

The best thing you can do for a bike rode in loose sand is add a steering stabilizer like a GPR or a Scott's...it improves steering control ten fold and reduces the incidence of unexpected "get offs" caused by unseen objects under the sand. 

The key to a powerful, responsive machine is throttle control...master the throttle and you master the bike. It can't go faster than allowed to by the human :cool:.

:ride: BRAAP!

That makes sense. I just need to get on the bike and try all this out. Ill never truly understand all this until I put it in practice. I will look into that steering stabilizer. Thanks! 

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1 hour ago, BabyGroot69 said:

Yeah unfortunately we have to deal with winter. I want to ride so bad. I will look up this product and those trails. My friend has a cabin I believe close to oscoda area and that is the only place I ever rode the trails when I was little. That little 70 in the sand trails sucked :rolleyes:. Thanks!

Here's something to pass the time while the snow melts.  This isn't my video but it's a nice video of a little bit of the Tomahawk trail which I really enjoyed.  I wouldn't recommend it as your first trail, but it's definitely a must-do trail in the Lower Peninsula.  The whole trail is 116 miles.  I did about 50 miles of it last fall and was so sore I could barely move, but it was awesome.  As always the camera doesn't catch the elevation changes very well.

 

 

 

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That’s a serious bike. Much great advice has been given here. I’d simply like to add that some basic riding videos can really help you adapt to this (or any) machine and help you develop proper rider technique. This not only makes things safer, but really enhances your fun factor. Gary Semics and Shane Watts videos are excellent.

 

Congratulations! That’s a great bike.

 

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Congrats on the new cr👍👍 That's a pretty mellow 250 should be bout perfect for ya. 

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