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GPR steering stabilizer used with raisers.

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I bought a bike that came with a steering stabilizer, but the pin and shaft were broken. I figured since the bike came with it I mind as well put it to use. So I ordered a new pin and shaft and installed it. I quickly found out why the original one broke. Whoever installed the stabilizer flipped the handle bar raisers inward so the stabilizer would have somewhere to mount, but what they failed to see was the pin and shaft would hit the raisers before full steering lock causing it to break. I decided the cheapest (free) route was to make a bracket. I turned the raisers the opposite direction and started to make a bracket. It's not show quality, but it will work for a 18 year old motorcycle I would think. The only thing I'm going to change is the blots that hold the bracket to the raisers. I'm new to offroad riding so I really don't think it will do me a lot of good, but I figure it can't hurt.

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Nice, I made a similar mount for $3 worth of cold rolled steel. Aluminum is the better choice though.

Just make sure the steering stops in the triple clamp hit before the damper lever comes to a stop.

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1 hour ago, g steezy said:

I bought a bike that came with a steering stabilizer, but the pin and shaft were broken. I figured since the bike came with it I mind as well put it to use. So I ordered a new pin and shaft and installed it. I quickly found out why the original one broke. Whoever installed the stabilizer flipped the handle bar raisers inward so the stabilizer would have somewhere to mount, but what they failed to see was the pin and shaft would hit the raisers before full steering lock causing it to break. I decided the cheapest (free) route was to make a bracket. I turned the raisers the opposite direction and started to make a bracket. It's not show quality, but it will work for a 18 year old motorcycle I would think. The only thing I'm going to change is the blots that hold the bracket to the raisers. I'm new to offroad riding so I really don't think it will do me a lot of good, but I figure it can't hurt.

Very nice Pictorial !

Looks like it'll work to me :thumbsup:

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1 hour ago, Oldmossyspokes said:

I like working with aluminum. One can whittle almost anything out of it.

Pretty much any tool that works for wood also works with aluminum :cool:

Agreed, but for some reason my hole saw sure didn’t like it. 

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47 minutes ago, g steezy said:

Agreed, but for some reason my hole saw sure didn’t like it. 

Hole saw tip:  use wax...wax the crap out of the hole saw before you start and go slow.

If it chatters its either too fast or to dry...needs more wax. (not cutting fluid)

Firm pressure, go slow, use wax. :cool:

I've sawed hundreds of holes in aluminum from 5/8" up to six inch...best to use a half inch pneumatic drill...they stop if the saw grabs...an electric will twist your arm off if you don't let go of the trigger fast enough. A drill press is the safest way as long as it has a suitable vise clamp.

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7 hours ago, Oldmossyspokes said:

Hole saw tip:  use wax...wax the crap out of the hole saw before you start and go slow.

If it chatters its either too fast or to dry...needs more wax. (not cutting fluid)

Firm pressure, go slow, use wax. :cool:

I've sawed hundreds of holes in aluminum from 5/8" up to six inch...best to use a half inch pneumatic drill...they stop if the saw grabs...an electric will twist your arm off if you don't let go of the trigger fast enough. A drill press is the safest way as long as it has a suitable vise clamp.

I had it in a drill press. I did use cutting oil, I don’t have any wax. I also had the drill press set as slow as possible, but I wish it could of gone slower. I got it done, I’m just glad I only had to drill one hole.

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2 hours ago, g steezy said:

I had it in a drill press. I did use cutting oil, I don’t have any wax. I also had the drill press set as slow as possible, but I wish it could of gone slower. I got it done, I’m just glad I only had to drill one hole.

Cutting oil tends to yield the opposite of the desired result when using hole saws with aluminum plate...wax is best.

There are perhaps three levels of hole saws, "wood", "bi-metal", and "machinists". When using the wood variety they need to be brand new and don't last long (dull quickly) if they are subjected to over speeding and chatter...smooth even cutting is the key. Bi-metal are the best of the affordable hole saws and hold up really well when waxed up prior to every cutting. Machinist hole saws are what I would call "state of the art"...very expensive with exceptional results.

Mark the top of the hole saw with three evenly spaced dots (sharpie). If they blur together when cutting the saw is going to fast...if you can watch them go around individually that's about right...slow, slow. If the hole saw becomes hot during the cut that's clear indication of over speeding and lack of wax. One actually can cut a smooth hole with square clean edges with a hole saw in aluminum but typically some buffing will be required. Its best to use a hole saw 1/8" smaller than one wants the finished hole to be if accuracy is a must. Unless a very slow speed can be maintained the hole saw will nearly always cut a bigger hole than the size its marked with, in aluminum. A "flapper wheel" chucked up in a variable speed die grinder makes quick work of the finish, however a flapper wheel in a drill will also work, it just takes longer.

Edited by Oldmossyspokes
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1 minute ago, Oldmossyspokes said:

Good luck on your future fabrication efforts where aluminum and hole saws are part of the equation :thumbsup:

haha, as you can see I'm no fabractor. I do bodywork for a living so I have just enough knowledge to get stuff done. Our shop has some pretty decent stuff, but some stuff isn't ideal for some jobs. I finished everything using a 3M gasket remover on a 3 inch disc and gasket remover on a 3M belt sander.

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17 minutes ago, g steezy said:

haha, as you can see I'm no fabractor. I do bodywork for a living so I have just enough knowledge to get stuff done. Our shop has some pretty decent stuff, but some stuff isn't ideal for some jobs. I finished everything using a 3M gasket remover on a 3 inch disc and gasket remover on a 3M belt sander.

Fabrication, like Carpentry, is the art of fixing ones mistakes before anyone notices. :cool:

It's also the art of doing what you need with what you have to work with, I have decades of experience learning what not to do...this is all there is to it.

You are a great Fabricator...you see it in your mind and make it happen, you are also smart enough to ask question and seek knowledge...good on you! You could build anything you have the tools, materials and vision to create.

:ride:

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Hey Mossy - what kind of wax are you talking about? Paste wax (car)? or harder like a candle? Thanks for the tips on making holes in aluminum. I use a drill press but I've never thought to slow it down and use wax.

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21 hours ago, fkfw said:

Hey Mossy - what kind of wax are you talking about? Paste wax (car)? or harder like a candle? Thanks for the tips on making holes in aluminum. I use a drill press but I've never thought to slow it down and use wax.

Like this product:

https://www.amazon.com/BruteLube-XLUB-STICK-16-16-Ounce-Cutting-Stick 

I haven't used this brand exactly but most of it is the same, pretty much. I like the white variety the best. One can also greatly benefit from coating abrasive disc's, drill bits, die grinder bits and the like. Anywhere where "chip welding" becomes an issue. I usually take the tube of wax and saw it into three equal sections on the band saw, cover one end of the center section with duct tape. This way I have one for plunging drill bits into and two for coating saws and discs. You can feed it out of a short section of tube like a "push up pop" .:cool:.

"Chip welding"? If one has ever used a die grinder on aluminum they know what chip welding is...it's all that aluminum stuck to the bit afterwards. It's also what causes whole saws to chatter and saw ugly holes. Too much heat...just for fun search "friction stir welding", same physics going on there but with the chip welding being the desired outcome.

Thanks for asking and let me know if you are wondering about anything else with aluminum working, I may have done it.

:ride:

Edited by Oldmossyspokes
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Like this product:
https://www.amazon.com/BruteLube-XLUB-STICK-16-16-Ounce-Cutting-Stick 
I haven't used this brand exactly but most of it is the same, pretty much. I like the white variety the best. One can also greatly benefit from coating abrasive disc's, drill bits, die grinder bits and the like. Anywhere where "chip welding" becomes an issue. I usually take the tube of wax and saw it into three equal sections on the band saw, cover one end of the center section with duct tape. This way I have one for plunging drill bits into and two for coating saws and discs. You can feed it out of a short section of tube like a "push up pop" .:cool:.
"Chip welding"? If one has ever used a die grinder on aluminum they know what chip welding is...it's all that aluminum stuck to the bit afterwards. It's also what causes whole saws to chatter and saw ugly holes. Too much heat...just for fun search "friction stir welding", same physics going on there but with the chip welding being the desired outcome.
Thanks for asking and let me know if you are wondering about anything else with aluminum working, I may have done it.
:ride:

I use brute lube wax on a regular basis. It's always on my service truck and is a very versatile product. It's good stuff for what you are describing. It also works well for lubing lag screws in hardwood.
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Let me throw a bit more at you while discussing Fab tools for aluminum cutting and shaping.

  • If you use die grinder bits for shaping and clean up there are course bits made for aluminum, don't use the fine ones made for steel as they will clog quickly, use wax and a steady strong grip, cut so the rotation is pulling away from you, don't let the chuck get loose or bad things happen. Remove small amounts of material to avoid the heat.
  • When using hole saws the cuttings coming off the saw should be filings or ribbon like (small ribbons). If you're getting little turd balls your saw is dull and the material is over heating...that's why it sounds like somebody is killing the neighbor's goose.
  • Cordless 1/2" chuck drill motor is best for hole saws if you must use an electric drill, set it in "screw mode" at about 95% of the break away clutch setting. If it keeps clutching out you're pushing to hard.
  • A router can be used to round off edges to perfection...use wax and very little pressure. Remove a slight amount of material in a pass. Yes, the same router used for wood.
  • Flat, half round, and full round, quality, double cut bastard files work great for shaping...don't wax them.
  • Your skill saw is a precision aluminum cutting tool...use wax on the blade and the table or foot or plate or what ever its called where the blade sticks out. Feed slowly and don't let it kick back and saw your leg off. Keep both hands on the saw at all times...if you can't, you're doing it wrong and are going to the hospital soon :naughty:
  • Table saws work also but the blades cost far more...not for beginners, very dangerous kickback results, if it happens. Think flying razor sharp aluminum shrapnel, not good.
  • Cover your new plate with contact paper or masking tape to keep from scratching the surface when working it. Remove the paper immediately after working, never let it get exposed to weather for any length of time or you will play hell getting it off.

USE PROPER PPE: Safety glasses, hearing protection, face shields, and long sleeves. Also, cut resistant gloves when handling the sharp edges that will be created. A simple deburring tool goes a long way towards quickly dulling those sharp edges.       https://www.amazon.com/Noga-Heavy-Duty-Deburr-blades   The debur tool is the most basic of "must have" items in the tool kit, they are awesome for chamfering the edges of the bolt holes drilled, fast and efficient, simple and cheap.

Be smart...stupid hurts. :cool:

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Thanks! Just ordered some. Curious to see how it does cutting 1/4" AL plate with my jigsaw, which I just did recently without the wax.

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13 hours ago, Oldmossyspokes said:

 

  • Flat, half round, and full round, quality, double cut bastard files work great for shaping...don't wax them.

I was taught to use a little chalk on files - back in the day

 

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