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Shock shaft stuck

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I ran into trouble trying to remove the shaft on my Showa rear shock. From the picture you can see that's as far as it will go. It seems to be catching on the circlip groove (or something). Yes, the clip is out and the body is clean. Is the bushing out of sorts and holding the whole shaft hostage? Can anyone I.D. the spring, I don't believe it's original (because it's red). Thanks.

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It is just hard to get apart sometimes. Clamp the bottom part in a vise upside down and smack the top part down with a rubber mallet.

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Also push the seal head down into the shock and put some grease around around clip groove, the Piston oring gets stuck there I think 

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1 hour ago, tom02cr250 said:

Also push the seal head down into the shock and put some grease around around clip groove, the Piston oring gets stuck there I think 

That's what the red stuff is on the shock top (Lucas #2 Red and Tacky). I hope this is just a matter of re-cleaning and greasing. I'll go at it again right now.

 

UPDATE:  I got it. I just kept twisting and pulling and it finally came out. Oil everywhere and it stinks like it hasn't been changed in ages.

Edited by Fred29

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  This is somewhat common, also very messy and aggravating. 

 But there is a reason for it , if the gas pressure gets low they sealhead will hammer up and down ,  this can and will cause the circlip groove to become slightly mushroomed. 

 

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6 minutes ago, E-TECH said:

  This is somewhat common, also very messy and aggravating. 

 But there is a reason for it , if the gas pressure gets low they sealhead will hammer up and down ,  this can and will cause the circlip groove to become slightly mushroomed. 

 

There was more pressure in a can of Coke than there was in the chamber when I released it. I did get them separated with a lot of force. And yes, I got covered in the worst smelling oil you can imagine. Thanks for the response.

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You need to turn your rebound all the way in before you release the nitrogen.  This allows oil to bypass the piston and prevent the vacuum (and mess) when you try to pull it out.

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12 minutes ago, bg10459 said:

You need to turn your rebound all the way in before you release the nitrogen.  This allows oil to bypass the piston and prevent the vacuum (and mess) when you try to pull it out.

There was no nitrogen to release. The rebound was full in. I tipped it side to side until I couldn't get any more out. I didn't get soaked, it was just the remaining oil on the head and inner body.

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Um do you mean turn rebound clicker all the way out? That controls the bleed bypass past the Piston and if it's all the way in no oil can bypass the Piston? I've always read turn the clicker all the way out.. but also I know sometimes there is vacuum holding it together.

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Sorry, my mistake, all the way out (full bypass, fast rebound).  So, if you had the compression adjuster out, then of course, none of this applies.   But if not, and you release or just lose all the nitrogen before you open the rebound, the bypass can stay closed because there's no pressure on it.  Then you get vacuum behind the piston and difficulty pulling it out.

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21 hours ago, bg10459 said:

You need to turn your rebound all the way in before you release the nitrogen.  This allows oil to bypass the piston and prevent the vacuum (and mess) when you try to pull it out.

You sure?

 No you need there in the rebound all the way out before releasing nitrogen ....

Edited by E-TECH

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I've got it together and ready for nitrogen. The manual calls for 142 psi. I'm an inexperienced rider who's never been more than a foot or two off the ground. I weigh 195 lbs. and will most likely ride trails and open fields. Should the psi be increased due to my weight? I thought I read the specs are for a 150 lb. rider. I'll be getting into setting the sag and tuning the clickers, but the nitrogen has to come first because the shop has no 9-5 mechanics in the winter and someone will be there tomorrow. Thanks and please tell me if I've missed something or "X must come before Y, no matter what" kind of thing. 

Edited by Fred29

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No you'll be fine with 140, especially since you're not riding mx.

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This is a common problem, though it seems like Showa makes it worse with the particular type of machining they do for the snap ring groove.  The KYB's I've taken apart use a plain semicircular snap ring groove.  The one Showa I got into had a machined lip that caused a pretty good struggle when it came time to pull the seal head all the way out.  The oring pops into that groove and snags the lip.

Seems like you could put some kind of filler into the groove before attempting to pull the seal head.  A plastic ring or something to keep the seal head oring from expanding into the groove.  If I ever take another Showa apart I'm going to stick something in there.

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