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Can You Go Pro Without a Moto Trainer

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First off, I know I'm never going pro, but do you think it is possible to be winning moto/super cross championships with only self taught talent, without the aid of a professional trainer. Just curious.

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Even back in 'olden tymes' everyone had trainers and spotters. Looking for mistakes. Identifying areas they can improve on. Pushing during exercises and also knowing when to tell you to take a break or do something different.

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Every fast rider is doing similar things...its a whole lot quicker to be shown those techniques than to figure them out on your own. Its true in every sport.

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35 minutes ago, Sofiedog said:

Every fast rider is doing similar things...its a whole lot quicker to be shown those techniques than to figure them out on your own. Its true in every sport.

Expanding on this,

As a new rider wouldn't it make sense to learn from a pro/coach as soon as possible to eliminate repeating others mistakes? Everyone says seat time, but I keep considering trying to find a instructor to accelerate my learning.

Edited by NEGbrap

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Expanding on this,

As a new rider wouldn't it make sense to learn from a pro/coach as soon as possible to eliminate repeating others mistakes? Everyone says seat time, but I keep considering trying to find a instructor to accelerate my learning.

I'm there...been riding MX...actually VMX for only one year.
Its seat time with proper technique that counts.
I've been practicing with a few of Gary Semics videos...I love it. Techniques obviously make you faster...but I have to slow down to 80% in practice 'thinking' about executing techniques...then, over time, they happen without thinking.
A private lesson from an instructor would do me wonders, I'm sure.
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Befriend a vet A racer and learn from him . Just do the best you can not as easy as looks 

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8 minutes ago, Sofiedog said:


I'm there...been riding MX...actually VMX for only one year.
Its seat time with proper technique that counts.
I've been practicing with a few of Gary Semics videos...I love it. Techniques obviously make you faster...but I have to slow down to 80% in practice 'thinking' about executing techniques...then, over time, they happen without thinking.
A private lesson from an instructor would do me wonders, I'm sure.

This is a critical point most guys refuse to 'get'. You have to go slow to learn to go fast. Ride slow enough to nail every maneuver. Then ever so slowly, increase speed while nailing the marks. If you miss, either you are tired or going to fast.

Having a 'spotter' who knows what to look for will make a big difference too.

Also previous mentioned is the learning curve. Having someone teach you the right way from the beginning is easier to master than to undo bad habits.

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35 minutes ago, William1 said:

This is a critical point most guys refuse to 'get'. You have to go slow to learn to go fast. Ride slow enough to nail every maneuver. Then ever so slowly, increase speed while nailing the marks. If you miss, either you are tired or going to fast.

Having a 'spotter' who knows what to look for will make a big difference too.

Also previous mentioned is the learning curve. Having someone teach you the right way from the beginning is easier to master than to undo bad habits.

I agree wholeheartedly. Ive been riding for 3 years, but next year is my first race year. I assume it will be a rude awakening, I'd love a coach or vet A rider but honestly I don't know where to start in New England. I don't mind putting in the work, not trying to go pro, but I would like to accelerate the skillset.

I am a collector of hobbies and have always sought out instruction, from fly fishing, to climbing, to building PC's, even in PC games like CS 1.6 and League of Legends! I just find it harder in the dirt bike world. Sure I can buy Gary Seimacs stuff, but I would rather spend money on a full day of instruction. I don't want to race motocross, so is it worth it getting motocross instruction? I don't know.

But for now, I am just going to continue to chase my A rider buddies and focus on the kernels I pick up.

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1 hour ago, NEGbrap said:

Expanding on this,

As a new rider wouldn't it make sense to learn from a pro/coach as soon as possible to eliminate repeating others mistakes? Everyone says seat time, but I keep considering trying to find a instructor to accelerate my learning.

There is a difference between a good rider and a good coach. Unfortunately those 2 don't always go hand in hand... 

Want to accelerate your program, work on conditioning and technical skills...speed comes over time... 

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Befriend a vet A racer and learn from him . Just do the best you can not as easy as looks 

You know what I noticed the good vet racers want to talk about after practice or a race? Faster lines they found and good places to shift! lots of little details!
Most are always willing to help...Guy was giving me pointers couple weekends ago...I asked him his story...how did he get so fast?...he wins everything!...he said he was a former Yamaha factory support rider in the Phoenix region in the mid '80s!
I think you are right...if I'm excited and having fun bench racing after practice or a race and I just state out front that I am a Novice wanting to learn to go faster...the faster vet guys open up...most seem to enjoy sharing and teaching what they have learned.
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28 minutes ago, Sofiedog said:


You know what I noticed the good vet racers want to talk about after practice or a race? Faster lines they found and good places to shift! lots of little details!
Most are always willing to help...Guy was giving me pointers couple weekends ago...I asked him his story...how did he get so fast?...he wins everything!...he said he was a former Yamaha factory support rider in the Phoenix region in the mid '80s!
I think you are right...if I'm excited and having fun bench racing after practice or a race and I just state out front that I am a Novice wanting to learn to go faster...the faster vet guys open up...most seem to enjoy sharing and teaching what they have learned.

Ya is the little things you'll learn makes you faster. One of the fastest vet A racers in this state and well in the country without pro license took me under his wing was i was young. Just started talking became great friends I went racing every weekend for many years with him been like my big bro for over 20 years.  He's made LL every year since' 02 no b.s. has 30+ years in and still is amazingly smooth . But ya take whatever advice and try to use it 👍👍 you've come long way and started very late my hats off to ya 🏁 what's cool is 10 years ago I went to the +30A class and raced him but only beat him couple motos then broke myself ,time off not racing as much im not as fast. But this year im racing him again in the 40 class so excited bout that. But I will just be eating roost for while till get back racing shape

Edited by Motox367
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On 1/29/2018 at 1:26 PM, Hunter-13 said:

 

First off, I know I'm never going pro, but do you think it is possible to be winning moto/super cross championships with only self taught talent, without the aid of a professional trainer. Just curious.

 

I think that's a stretch. The wealth of information I've gathered from different trainers over the years such as Matt Walker and Timmy Ferry (to name a few) have helped me not only as someone who races, but how the motocross industry works... which is definitely not the prettiest. I've mainly worked by myself for the past 3-4 years, with minimal help from a professional trainer. Once you have the correct form and such, it becomes a thing of learning how to read a track and how to read other racers. A foot or even six inches one way or the other on a track can make a huge difference! At that point, having someone pointing out small mistakes or giving their suggestion of how to approach certain situations. At the level of racing now it is almost a requirement to have been trained at some point to know the right way to ride.

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On 1/30/2018 at 3:19 PM, Sofiedog said:

Every fast rider is doing similar things...its a whole lot quicker to be shown those techniques than to figure them out on your own. Its true in every sport.

Very true. The main body positions of all riders is very similar, however everyone has their own personal style. While there isn't anything wrong with that, we all have our bad habits. Having someone identifying and hammering out those bad habits is both a speed advantage and to be quite honest, it helps keep you safe.

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