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oil drain plug wrong choice?

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Erik/anyone,

I drained the oil from the lower plug that is connected to the hose rather than the one you point the arrow to in this photo. Is that a problem? I assume that may be why I'm not getting oil to show up on the dipstick? I had a crappy picture I was using and took a guess - wrong guess I see.

post-18851-13264036744023.jpg

Edited by dogeddie

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The one with the arrow is the oil tank drain,,,, the one you used is the oil hose to case, no big deal, just drained an ounce more that way..
You still need to drain the motor anyway, so no matter what all that oil was going to get drained.

Careful on replacing both the oil hose banjo bolt and the case drain, just snug... and use a new crush washer on the case drain plug.

Both those are going in to aluminum so go easy

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Thanks AGAIN Erik! Initially I removed the regular drain bolt on the bottom. Not nearly enough oil came out and I said "oh hell". Then I did some checking and found their is the second oil drain for the frame and Voila!! Oil!! Glad it didn't matter that I used the banjo bolt instead.

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Order a few crush washers while you're at it, always good practice to use new ones.
09168-12002

 

Edited by HansLanda

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that doesn't explain why you aren't getting oil on the dipstick. You should add 2 quarts after draining it and be at the full mark on the dipstick. Make sure not to run it without enough oil.

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I have read that there is some variance on the best way to check oil, and that some say check immediately after shutting off engine, and some say wait 3 minutes like the manual says.  Some said they don't get accurate readings by just idling the bike - they have to drive it a bit first. I haven't dug into that yet as it got cold here again - so not sure where to go with this yet.

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 Driving the bike first to get it good and warm is correct for oil checking, and waiting 2or3 minutes after shut-off to check is also correct

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4 hours ago, dogeddie said:

I have read that there is some variance on the best way to check oil, and that some say check immediately after shutting off engine, and some say wait 3 minutes like the manual says.  Some said they don't get accurate readings by just idling the bike - they have to drive it a bit first. I haven't dug into that yet as it got cold here again - so not sure where to go with this yet.

The best way is the way the Suzuki repair manual says to do it.  With the engine cold start and let idle for three minutes, shut it off and wait three minutes, making sure the bike is on level ground and standing straight up remove the oil dipstick wipe it off with a clean cloth and reinsert it.  You don't screw it in, just insert it and remove it.  That will give you an accurate reading. 

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23 minutes ago, drzmadness said:

The best way is the way the Suzuki repair manual says to do it.  With the engine cold start and let idle for three minutes, shut it off and wait three minutes, making sure the bike is on level ground and standing straight up remove the oil dipstick wipe it off with a clean cloth and reinsert it.  You don't screw it in, just insert it and remove it.  That will give you an accurate reading. 

 That way may work if it's 90degrees out, and the bike is sitting in the sun. From my experience, 3minutes of idle time on a cold motor is not enough time to get an accurate reading, chances are, no oil will show on the stick

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3 minutes ago, Dmouse said:

 That way may work if it's 90degrees out, and the bike is sitting in the sun. From my experience, 3minutes of idle time on a cold motor is not enough time to get an accurate reading, chances are, no oil will show on the stick

unless the bike has sat for a long time all of the oil should be in the frame anyway.  If you cant get oil to show after three minutes I think you have a problem.  You can always check with the experts here on the site, or Suzuki themselves.  

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I searched quite a bit online and there is a crap ton of internet posts with other DRZ owners with the same oil reading irregularities.

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11 minutes ago, drzmadness said:

unless the bike has sat for a long time all of the oil should be in the frame anyway.  If you cant get oil to show after three minutes I think you have a problem.  You can always check with the experts here on the site, or Suzuki themselves.  

 I've had my bike since almost new for close to 10years and it has always checked that way... I still may have a problem, but I doubt it

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Well I have personaly put 70,000 miles on my drz and after a rebuild and several top ends the method has never failed me.  I don't recall a time that oil didn't show on the dipstick after sitting for a week or two, and the Suzuki manual gets everything else right.  I would stick with it rather than  go off of what other people are saying unless it is someone like Noble, Erik Marquez, etc

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The idea of using the owners manual method is to get a predictable and consistent reading.
the procedure does not need oil at full operating temp, so those claiming it wont be in 3 min are correct, they are also not understanding the intent of the procedure


All we are trying to do is move oil to a location it can be measured at, 3 min run time is about 2:45 longer than that will take.

Thermal coefficient expansion of engine oil is minimal in this application.
For common petroleum density=.8467 coefficient of expansion roughly = .0006/C 
Assuming volume is 2 L, that 2 L will "expand" .0006 for every deg C it heats up 
Starting to get the idea Hot, Medium, Kind a Warm don't really make a huge difference 

Follow the procedure outlined, from oil in, to oil out, to warm up, cool down and check with the bike at the same angles front to rear, side to side each time and oil at 20 deg C or 35 deg C is not going to matter for our needs.
A variable some may not get is, the anti drain back valve..a simple rubber plug, spring and check ball... that often seems to not work well in some used bikes..(finding your oil all in the motor, little to none in the tank? The valve shoe fits)
IMG_0334.thumb.JPG.dfa06511b4825935a4ab6eac67c8dbac.JPG
So its less important that the oil mark on your dipstick matches your buddys DRZ after following the same procedure and more about it matching a known mark point that is "normal" for yours.

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We (my son and I) did some tests tonight. Two nights ago I changed the oil, let it run for 5 minutes or so (did not drive it, just idle) and checked the oil after waiting 3 minutes with the bike upright. It did not register on the dipstick. Oh shit.

So today after reading the forums we fired it up and rode around for 10 minutes or so (and froze our asses off) We checked the oil at intervals:

1) immediately after shut down - 3/4 up on dipstick

2) after 1 minute - 5/8 up on dipstick

3) after 2 minutes - 5/8 up on stick

4) after 3 minutes - 5/8 up on stick

So at least for me, it looks like the bike did have significantly different readings after actually driving the bike, rather than checking oil after an oil change but before driving it. FWIW

 

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You must always ride the bike before checking the oil level, this is in the level check procedure.

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 The transmission fluid check on my 2000 Chevy van is a difficult thing to read, the owners manual actually states it in so many words. Maybe Suzuki should add to their instructions that 'results may vary'. This has all come up a few times before in the last 2years since I've been on TT, and if I remember correctly, most people were warming up their bikes much more than 3minutes to get an accurate reading

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