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Hey all. Anyone know if I can run cam 2 110 octane leaded racing fuel in my stock DRZ400? I run Sunoco gt100 octane and the throttle response plus hp gain is very noticeable. 

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3 minutes ago, Brettskii said:

Hey all. Anyone know if I can run cam 2 110 octane leaded racing fuel in my stock DRZ400? I run Sunoco gt100 octane and the throttle response plus hp gain is very noticeable. 

Interesting that you can feel the difference with a higher octane gasoline. Higher octane is just going to prevent predetination. I don't think it would give any more HP. Throttle response and fuel mileage sure, but not HP. I am by no means an expert on the subject but this is my understanding.

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 I'm no expert either, but from what I've read to understand is that using a higher octane than your bike requires is a waste. My DRZ calls for 91octane, I believe

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I had a drz400sm and it ran the best on 91-93 octane. Ethanol free of course. They're not really high output engines until you do work to them.

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Hey all. Anyone know if I can run cam 2 110 octane leaded racing fuel in my stock DRZ400? I run Sunoco gt100 octane and the throttle response plus hp gain is very noticeable. 

NO lol. Octane is a measure of the explosive potential of fuel, thats it. Lower octane fuel actually provides MORE energy because it is more explosive. You do not gain hp by using higher octane. People get confused about this because higher performance engines with higher compression need higher octane to prevent predetonation. That said, run all the leaded fuel you want, if you don't have a catalytic converter it won't hurt anything, but it is toxic and will absolutely not gain you any performance.
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10 minutes ago, HeavyRotation said:


NO lol. Octane is a measure of the explosive potential of fuel, thats it. Lower octane fuel actually provides MORE energy because it is more explosive. You do not gain hp by using higher octane. People get confused about this because higher performance engines with higher compression need higher octane to prevent predetonation. That said, run all the leaded fuel you want, if you don't have a catalytic converter it won't hurt anything, but it is toxic and will absolutely not gain you any performance.

well, sort of true,

the number is an average of the motor octane and research octane ratings which come from tests in a variable compression ratio engine comparing the onset of detonation to a mixture of iso-octane and n-heptane.  Its resistance to heat and pressure induced combustion (combustion without spark or pre ignition) is measured.

It does not speak for other properties of the fuel such as its energy content, oxygen content or vaporization characteristics which will have effects on power output and throttle response.

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2 hours ago, downonmonday said:

I had a drz400sm and it ran the best on 91-93 octane. Ethanol free of course. They're not really high output engines until you do work to them.

I agree, for what it's worth, with downonmonday.........Ethanol free gas was the only kind I every used. Even when traveling to distant places and needing gas, the boat launch at Paulina Lake always had that as an option.

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3 hours ago, EnglertRacing said:

well, sort of true,

the number is an average of the motor octane and research octane ratings which come from tests in a variable compression ratio engine comparing the onset of detonation to a mixture of iso-octane and n-heptane.  Its resistance to heat and pressure induced combustion (combustion without spark or pre ignition) is measured.

It does not speak for other properties of the fuel such as its energy content, oxygen content or vaporization characteristics which will have effects on power output and throttle response.

Exactly, the others here don't realize some of the higher octane racing fuels are highly oxygenated, giving them more power and throttle response. We used a lower octane racing fuel (around 95 I think) VP fuels MR12 which is highly oxygenated, great power and throttle response but has some properties you wouldn't want in a daily driver or casual dirt bike. plus about $150. for a 20 liter pail.:facepalm:

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Basically your pissing your money away. The bike was not designed for high octane race fuel. Your not going to gain anything by running it. If your bike was modified with high compression then you will need to run higher octane for it not to detonate. I always laugh when kids put it in there stock quads and dirt bikes and think it actually makes a difference. It does smell good though.

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13 hours ago, EnglertRacing said:

It does not speak for other properties of the fuel such as its energy content, oxygen content or vaporization characteristics which will have effects on power output and throttle response.

Not the first time I've heard that. :thumbsup:

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placebo effect on more hp ;)

 

I wouldn't mind running some root beer smell in my motorcycle though.....

 

rippin-root-beer.jpg

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On 1/31/2018 at 9:14 AM, Signman606 said:

I agree, for what it's worth, with downonmonday.........Ethanol free gas was the only kind I every used. Even when traveling to distant places and needing gas, the boat launch at Paulina Lake always had that as an option.

While this site isn't always 100% accurate, it does make for a good guide. Always look on the pump, if it has ethanol, they must indicate so.

https://www.pure-gas.org/

I wouldn't run ethanol fuel in any of my vehicles, especially  my lawnmower!!! :jawdrop:

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well, sort of true,
the number is an average of the motor octane and research octane ratings which come from tests in a variable compression ratio engine comparing the onset of detonation to a mixture of iso-octane and n-heptane.  Its resistance to heat and pressure induced combustion (combustion without spark or pre ignition) is measured.
It does not speak for other properties of the fuel such as its energy content, oxygen content or vaporization characteristics which will have effects on power output and throttle response.

The question was octane, I try to keep it dumbed down for newbs asking newb questions.
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Plus there are so many different versions , some are non oxygenated , leaded, unleaded ,ect... all will effect performance outcome .

 

 

.

Edited by jjktmrider

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2 hours ago, HeavyRotation said:


The question was octane, I try to keep it dumbed down for newbs asking newb questions.

My point I guess was that fuel can make a difference in power, but if your not having detonation issues it won't be because of octane

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Like the OP, I have had friends tank up on it at the track. They claim it's very noticeable. Never done it myself, but my friends are reliable. :thumbsup:

 

Hydrocarbon Octane Numbers

Hydrocarbon PON Octane Number

Heptane 0

2-Methylheptane 23

Hexane 25

2-Methylhexane 44

1-Heptene 60

Pentane 62

1-Pentene 84

Butane 91

Cyclohexane 97

2,2,4-Trimethylpentane (isooctane) 100

Benzene 101

Toluene 11

 

There is a lot in motor fuel, and like anything else, speed costs money.

Quote

In essence, what Burns explained to us is that his engineers “hand pick” the constituents that make up the different types of fuel that VP Racing Fuels manufacture. Each type of fuel has a specific purpose and predictability by design. The cost of making a premium racing fuel is higher than a pump gas that operates in a wider operating range of variables and less energy potential, but it’s no different than paying a slightly higher price for an aftermarket engine component that is tailor made for high performance.

Final Thought: Let’s Put This All In Perspective.

A gallon of race gas can cost between $8 to $12 a gallon. The process of manufacturing that gallon of race gas goes way beyond the typical process of manufacturing pump gas. There is still the exploration, recovery of crude, fractional distillation, and refining, all done under the regulatory oversight of big brother. Then the selection of additives, the chemicals that make race gas a high performance product are selectively added. To cap it all off, there’s packaging, marketing, handling wastes and all the other costs of doing business.

http://www.enginelabs.com/engine-tech/what-you-really-should-know-about-racing-fuel/

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