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04crf250

First Time Toy Hauler Owner - Help an Idiot, Please

9 posts in this topic

Howdy all!

I've wanted a toy hauler since I started riding 20 years ago, and I finally made it happen! A few weeks ago I purchased a 2006 Weekend Warrior FS2300. (Yes, I knew about the Weekend Warrior problems ahead of time).  The trailer was a great deal, has been stored under a carport it's whole life, and was owned by a couple who used it twice a year (New Years and 4th of July) for family reunions...needless to say it was cleaner than most of the bajillion I looked at. I've gone through the WW and cleaned/prepped/done maintenance to everything I could think of, but I still have a few questions that I am fully aware are stupid...never having been around RVs or Toy Haulers, I just legitimately have no idea:

  1. Can you run the refrigerator when you are towing? Specifically, if I head out for a weekend should I pack my food and drink in a cooler and transfer it over when we get to our destination, or is it okay to put in the refrigerator before we head out?
  2. If we have 2 people using the toilet and shower for 2 nights, should I empty the black and grey-water tanks immediately? Or if we plan to head out again within a few weeks, is it okay to leave it until we have a few more days of use?
  3. Does the generator charge the batteries as well as powering the trailer? When do people usually run the generator?
  4. In general, is there anything I should know about toy haulers/travel trailers?
  5. Specific to the WW frame issue, what can I do to mitigate the problem? I checked the frame and while it has a VERY slight (few degree) upturn, the frame is, for all intents and purposes, straight. I haven't seen photos of the frame repair so I can't confirm, but I don't believe it's been done on this trailer.  

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Congrats on the new to you rig!

1. Yes, you can run the generator while towing. Just be sure to shut it off before driving into any gas stations. I usually prep our trailer the day prior to a trip. We turn on the fridge using propane and let it cool down overnight, loading it with food in the morning. We have a small battery powered fridge fan that helps cool it down a lot faster.

2. We always empty our tanks before putting the trailer away. If your toilet gasket fails while the trailer is in storage, who knows how long it will be before you realize the interior is being marinated by the black tank. Lots of ways to manage the gray and black tanks. We drop a dishwasher pod into each tank before each trip to keep the sensors clean.

3. The generator does charge the batteries as well as powering the trailer. Some people never use the generator but we use ours all the time. Just be sure to keep up on the maintenance and use Marine Stabil in the fuel to save the carb from getting varnished. We are currently looking into getting a power converter to help cut down on generator use for the small stuff in the trailer.

4. Lots of answers to this Q. For your trailer I would say make sure the trailer is level before opening the rear to load and unload. This should help in preventing twist with that WW frame. Replace tires if older than 4 years, adjust the brakes, and grease your wheel bearings annually.

5. I've never owned a WW so can't help you here.

 

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Just to clarify on #1. You can run fridge, don't run the generator. We always cool the fridge a day or so before, then leave it off until set up at camp. Fridge will stay cold for a while. We usually take a 3-4 hour jaunt before set up, then get the propane going for the fridge. 

Run generator at camp. I am putting so.ar on mine to help lessen gen you noise. 

How old are the batteries? I am switching over to a pair of 6 volts with my set up. Can elaborate more on solar option if interested..

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I'll add that you should have full fridge of pre chilled food and drinks. A frozen gallon or 1/2 gallon of water helps to. I know in the years since I started camping they improved refrigerators but old habits work.

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9 hours ago, 04crf250 said:

Howdy all!

I've wanted a toy hauler since I started riding 20 years ago, and I finally made it happen! A few weeks ago I purchased a 2006 Weekend Warrior FS2300. (Yes, I knew about the Weekend Warrior problems ahead of time).  The trailer was a great deal, has been stored under a carport it's whole life, and was owned by a couple who used it twice a year (New Years and 4th of July) for family reunions...needless to say it was cleaner than most of the bajillion I looked at. I've gone through the WW and cleaned/prepped/done maintenance to everything I could think of, but I still have a few questions that I am fully aware are stupid...never having been around RVs or Toy Haulers, I just legitimately have no idea:

  1. Can you run the refrigerator when you are towing? Specifically, if I head out for a weekend should I pack my food and drink in a cooler and transfer it over when we get to our destination, or is it okay to put in the refrigerator before we head out?
  2. If we have 2 people using the toilet and shower for 2 nights, should I empty the black and grey-water tanks immediately? Or if we plan to head out again within a few weeks, is it okay to leave it until we have a few more days of use?
  3. Does the generator charge the batteries as well as powering the trailer? When do people usually run the generator?
  4. In general, is there anything I should know about toy haulers/travel trailers?
  5. Specific to the WW frame issue, what can I do to mitigate the problem? I checked the frame and while it has a VERY slight (few degree) upturn, the frame is, for all intents and purposes, straight. I haven't seen photos of the frame repair so I can't confirm, but I don't believe it's been done on this trailer.  

I have the same trailer. It is not good in real cold weather being a Superlite. If it doesn't have an electric tongue jack, get one. They make life a lot easier.

#4 Toyhaulers are generally tongue heavy without anything in them so you if you tow empty your settings will different than when you are loaded.

#5 The factory fix by Weekend Warrior was a 2" x 2" x 4' piece of steel tubing welded to the bottom of the tongue with half of it under the box of the trailer. Mine had added box support added to the frame. They stick out from the frame to support the body and are twice as thick as the stock brackets. I think 4 were added. There was a big difference in how it towed after my frame was braced. Before the brace work there was almost 2" of tongue flex before the frame would start lifting with the tongue jack. That made the trailer porpoise over bumps in the road which caused flex, which caused the caulking to crack and caused leaks. I had to pay out of pocket since WW went tits up before I could get them to warranty it. If yours is braced and is a low hour trailer you should be OK.

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14 hours ago, SMarquez said:

 

#5 The factory fix by Weekend Warrior was a 2" x 2" x 4' piece of steel tubing welded to the bottom of the tongue with half of it under the box of the trailer. Mine had added box support added to the frame. They stick out from the frame to support the body and are twice as thick as the stock brackets. I think 4 were added. There was a big difference in how it towed after my frame was braced. Before the brace work there was almost 2" of tongue flex before the frame would start lifting with the tongue jack. That made the trailer porpoise over bumps in the road which caused flex, which caused the caulking to crack and caused leaks. I had to pay out of pocket since WW went tits up before I could get them to warranty it. If yours is braced and is a low hour trailer you should be OK.

Is there any way I could impose on you to post a photo of your frame fix? The guy I bought the trailer from does industrial welding and offered to do the fix for free if I could find the way it's supposed to be done.

Thank you all so much for the insights. Super helpful for sure! Can't freakin' wait for Friday morning!

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12 hours ago, 04crf250 said:

Is there any way I could impose on you to post a photo of your frame fix? The guy I bought the trailer from does industrial welding and offered to do the fix for free if I could find the way it's supposed to be done.

Thank you all so much for the insights. Super helpful for sure! Can't freakin' wait for Friday morning!

Mine was dome differently but since I will be under there tomorrow I will take some pictures. As long as your cabinets are not pulling away from the walls you should be okay. Also look at the wheel wells inside, they should be snug against the walls and floor.

Ha, I just saw you over on RV.net asking there too. I should have told you to go there for the tongue fix.

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Congrats on the purchase. My buddy has a WW 28FB (notorious for this frame issue), and he recommended a helpful tip to help preserve your frame. When using your weight distributing hitch, keep it on until you get close to Your destination. Remove it when you know you are getting ready to go on any uneven ground. The angles/deflection encountered when doing any moderate "off-roading" put a ton of stress on the tongue with the distribution hitch, and can cause damage; Removing it can help preserve your frame. 

 

Also, for problem areas to look out for on your new trailer; make sure to check your batteries and your tires. If your tires DOT date is five years or older, ditch 'em. Either get new "e-rated" ST tires or look into converting to LT tires with new 16" wheels. I did just a higher rated tire, balanced, and keep the cold psi topped off; never had an issue. Your choice on whether you go with Chinese (cheaper, but can be questionable) tires or USA made ones. Goodyear finally started making them in the states again, and while expensive do provide peace of mind. While you are down there you should grease or at least inspect your bearings.

Make sure your batteries are good, and to check the date and water levels. 5-8 years is the average life of batteries. A good charger or even utilizing a better power converter will make a big difference in the life of your batteries. I upgraded to a Progressive Dynamics 60W unit and have been very happy. 

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