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    • Bryan Bosch

      JUST IN!   04/24/2018

      HOW TO: 4-STROKE PISTON REPLACEMENT DONE RIGHT!

51 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

I did my homework before buying these. There were some nice CNC ones made in USA for around $45-70 and cheap Chinese knockoffs for $17-30. I only found one review that said to stay away from the Chinese knockoffs but it didn't say why. Looking at the design, I assumed that maybe they would loosen on the pivot point before they would break, so decided to try the Chinese knockoffs from eBay, and mounted them on my CRF230. Yesterday I finally had a chance to try them out. Performance-wise they worked great. Having the handlebars moved 1" forward and 1" up really made a huge difference in riding this bike, as did a new rear tire, 1" fork spring preload spacers, repairing a leaky fork seal and replacing the fork oil with 15W. 

About 2-1/2 hours into my ride, I was going pretty fast on a straight smooth stretch, and all of a sudden I crashed very hard, my helmet slamming to the ground (with my head in it) and sliding for about 10-15 feet and banged my upper left rib cage, forearms, right knee and shoulder in spite of wearing all the protective gear. It really knocked the wind out of me and knocked the goggles off my helmet. I laid there dazed for a few moments wondering what happened before slowly moving around and feeling my body to see if I was injured. Other than a few cuts and scrapes I was okay. I looked over at my bike and noticed the handlebars had somehow turned and were parallel to the bike. In my confused state I was thinking of how bicycle handlebars can rotate on the stem, wondering how that happened on a motorcycle and how I hit hard enough to bend them. I finally got up and looked around to see what I had hit and was surprised to see it was relatively smooth and there were absolutely no obstacles. I noticed the handlebars were not rotated but had snapped cleanly off at the bar risers, right where they clamp into the triple clamp. That's when it dawned on me that I had not hit anything, the handlebars just snapped off at the risers; that's what caused the crash, and was not the result of it. Fortunately I had my tools and was able to remove the risers and replace the bars in the original clamps and ride out the 25 miles back to the trail head. 

Lesson learned. So here are some photos. I wish to warn anyone else before buying these, stay with the US made CNC ones like Rox (sold on here) and other brands. Some Chinese stuff is okay (like the amazing CNC milled ASV-type levers sold on eBay that you see on my bike, they worked great), but don't risk your life with these. I feel very lucky not to be in the hospital today. I should add that I sent a request to the Chinese eBay vendor that sold me these for $17 and asked if he would like to not only refund my money, but pay for a new helmet since mine is damaged pretty badly. This morning he offered me a $5 refund which I rejected. Ha! We'll see where that goes. I've already ponied up the extra money and ordered the Made in USA risers. 

IMG_20180415_171531.thumb.jpg.f5b6e610c79a8daef4b51344491a10a3.jpgIMG_20180415_171538.thumb.jpg.b80ae7e52a65e23535ae335262a4f943.jpg

This is the worst I've ever banged up a helmet. Can you imagine if I wasn't wearing one?

IMG_20180415_173227.thumb.jpg.c32035ed972869cee9c03c60009a3327.jpg

You can see from the separation this is very cheap aluminum casting, with low quality alloy. 

IMG_20180415_212727.thumb.jpg.4530870b43fa24f8d23ac0dd2010da87.jpg

Here is where I crashed and you can see I've already replaced the bars with the original clamps

IMG_20180415_173200.thumb.jpg.4401af4d931ae7a4b83d5b91dee45a75.jpg

Here is the actual picture from the eBay ad where I purchased these killer bar risers.

handlebar-risers.jpg.540d0a4f63a458524c354accfc5f5214.jpg

Edited by kcomst
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9 minutes ago, kcomst said:

This morning he offered me a $5 refund which I rejected. Ha! We'll see where that goes. I've already ponied up the extra money and ordered the Made in USA risers.

$5 refund - what an insult - you could have been seriously hurt.

 

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Pretty sure that if a US company made something like this, it would be criminal.

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Outward appearance, those risers don’t look strong.  A lot of potential stress on them the way they are designed.  The only ones I would trust off road are the solid ones that are like a machined block that extends your original mounting points straight up.

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4 minutes ago, Gflo said:

Outward appearance, those risers don’t look strong.  A lot of potential stress on them the way they are designed.  The only ones I would trust off road are the solid ones that are like a machined block that extends your original mounting points straight up.

The original is by Rox Speed FX and they are quite tough. But like anything innovative and popular, they've been knocked off. I ran some Rox on a 500lb ADV bike that I rode off-road and they held up well, but I didn't cartwheel the bike either. For their intended purpose, they do a good job. Not sure how long they've been around, but it's been a while.

 

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1 hour ago, Bryan Bosch said:

The original is by Rox Speed FX and they are quite tough. But like anything innovative and popular, they've been knocked off. I ran some Rox on a 500lb ADV bike that I rode off-road and they held up well, but I didn't cartwheel the bike either. For their intended purpose, they do a good job. Not sure how long they've been around, but it's been a while.

 

Thanks Bryan! We've been building our pivoting risers since 2000, in business since 1999. Most all of us here ride or have ridden and crashed and have yet to bend up or break a set of our risers. We're not saying it won't happen, after all, they said the titanic wouldn't sink right. We just build them out of true 6061 T6 Billet and they're tough. Not the cheap cast junk shown above. Even on those knock off listing that say they are CNC billet, we've seen them just like this. They are dangerous to use. Plus when anyone buys ours, you can actually call and get us on the phone or get an email back quickly from us. We still answer the phones here and reply quickly to emails. Anyone is free to give us a call or send an email. 218-326-1794 or email sales@roxspeedfx.com 

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We need a new race promoting knock-offs; The 23 Minutes of Glen Helen.

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20 minutes ago, crypto666 said:

We need a new race promoting knock-offs; The 23 Minutes of Glen Helen.

Hell yeah. On some sweet chinese CRFs and every part made of pot metal!

Helmets included!

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If you haven't learned what casting lines look like yet, shake off a few more cobwebs and check out the pictures from the ad you bit on. OEM castings, usually ok. Aftermarket castings, especially for a high force application...pass.

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3 hours ago, RoxSpeedFX said:

We just build them out of true 6061 T6 Billet and they're tough. Not the cheap cast junk shown above. Even on those knock off listing that say they are CNC billet, we've seen them just like this. 

You're absolutely right. The eBay vendor where I bought the Chinese junk says they're made of T6 6061 alloy that is CNC milled, which is an obvious outright lie. As for the real 6061 T6, I'm pretty sure that's what the original triple clamps are made of, which the factory bar clamp bolts to. So the Rox risers should be as durable as the factory setup. 

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Posted (edited)

As with most things in life, you get what you pay for. You are lucky you were not seriously injured.

Buy the good stuff first next time?

BTW - I can tell by looking at the listing photo they were not billet. That is just one clue among many indicators of the low quality.

Edited by mbrick
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A suggestion here-Google RSW. He makes complete replacement upper triple clamps, with adjustable bar mounts. Different heights are available. You can also choose 7/8" or oversize bar mounts. I have bought them for two different bikes, and they're the shizz. Around $150, totally worth it IMO.

crf.jpg

teeter.jpg

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Posted (edited)

Glad you made it out alive!

If you're trying to save a few bucks, try ATV bend bars. I use them on my wife's TW and my "backup/buddy bike" Wr250f.

 

Edited by manotickmike
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46 minutes ago, Imposing Will said:

 teeter.jpg

Those poor forks! 

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1 minute ago, Doc_d said:

Those poor forks! 

70's technology. They're fine. :D

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I did look and saw that before I bought. Even though the ad said CNC and T6 6061, it looked cast to me. So I spent some time researching the difference between cast and CNC. I only found one article that explained that even CNC milled comes from something that started out cast. What it really comes down to is the quality of the alloy, and is it forged. 

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8 minutes ago, kcomst said:

I did look and saw that before I bought. Even though the ad said CNC and T6 6061, it looked cast to me. So I spent some time researching the difference between cast and CNC. I only found one article that explained that even CNC milled comes from something that started out cast. What it really comes down to is the quality of the alloy, and is it forged. 

Even with identical alloy's... cast parts are usually weaker than billet made parts. The billet material is made in uniform blanks that keep the molecular structure more consistent, while cast parts have varying sizes and thicknesses which cause weak spots during the casting process.  

 

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