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CRF230F National Enduro Race Machine?

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Yes, I have probably lost my mind but I am campaigning my CRF230F in the National Enduro Series this year.  Man, do I get some funny looks when I roll up to the line on my 70’s technology race machine!  But, so far I am actually doing quite well. The first race was in South Carolina and the biggest race of the series with over 750 bikes.  I got pretty nerved out at this big event, and I was on row 1 so that added to my stress.  I rode really tight the first few test sections and finally found my groove on the last test and ended up finishing 2nd in class (50C). The 2nd race was scheduled in my home state (Louisiana) but unfortunately got canceled, so I really got screwed on that deal since I am very familiar with the course and it is 2 hours from my house.  The 3rd race was this weekend in Indiana. I arrived with a good attitude and confidence even though it was a MUD fest  This was the most difficult test I have ever endured on a dirt bike. I had a great 1st test section, (150 out of 500), but I got stuck several times in the 2nd test section and quickly got exhausted, completely exhausted!  There was so much carnage and overheating bikes and stuck bikes and exhausted riders, it was a fight for survival.  I ended up finishing 3rd in class. I broke my shifter and my seat bolt came out and the seat kept falling off every time I stood up, and I didn’t put the film in my new roll-off goggles that I bought the day before the race so I had no goggles!  So, despite all the funny looks my little 230 is exceeding expectations. Next race is Virginia in a few weeks, wish me luck. 

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Most excellent! 

Seat fix: page 201 of the shop manual.

Clevis pin and cotter, couple bucks at hardware store.  One of the first things I did. Simply brilliant.

 

 

Edited by On2Whls
?sp, I can't type so good
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Thanks for the update on the seat bolt part. I had been using a lynch pin in place of the seat bolt without issue, that is until the massive amount of mud that I endured disabled the Lynch pin. My ass was stuck/glued to the seat from the mud, so every time I stood up the seat came with me and then fell off. I will update to this system, thanks.

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Edited by jeffrow68

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They make these hitch pins in different diameters, but a shame they don't make em in short lengths. Of course, if they were too small they'd probably be hard to clip/unclip.

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Jeffrow, that's bad ass! Keep riding hard! Sorry to hear the Louisiana race was cancelled. Hope all the other races have the same good outcome. 

I can still see red through the mud, try harder next time :p

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Glad to see the lowly 230 can hold it's own.  Thanks for sharing and good luck next race Jeff!

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Great job!

Can we please get the list of modifications you have done to your bike to make it competitive.

Do you run both throttle cables or just one with that thick mud?

How did your air cooled bike do (overheating wise) when other bikes were overheating? 

Thanks, 

Ken

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Posted (edited)
22 minutes ago, Slowryder said:

 

 

Quote

How did your air cooled bike do (overheating wise) when other bikes were overheating? 

Thanks, 

Ken

That can be just as big a problem for air cooled bikes. Back in the days before liquid cooling when I raced MX your cylinder and head fins would pack up with mud. Bikes would overheat bad. I'd like to know how his bike did. That was 2 strokes, so we had pretty big fins on the head, too.

Edited by cjjeepercreeper
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When we ride in heavy mud the air cooled 230s and Xr never had a over heating problem. The water cooled Ktms first ones to over heat. It hardly ever rains here but when it does. The red clay sticks like glue

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Man that thing has it's own weight in mud attached! Lol at the mud cooling. As long as cool fresh mud gets constantly splattered on the engine you can keep from overheating right?

Epic!

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Thanks for the responses. It definitely feels weird racing on this vintage era bike, but I am riding faster and with more endurance than I ever have on a long list of modern race bikes.  It is hard to explain this transformation, even my riding friends are at a loss as to explain how I am kicking their asses on a trail bike.

Regarding overheating issues at the mud race, I don’t think I had any. I use always fresh Motul synthetic oil and change it frequently. My oil appeared used but not burnt or excessively fouled after the race. I was very hard on the clutch, and especially harder since I only had 2nd gear for the latter part of the race.  I will probably change the clutch over the summer just to be safe. The only real issue was the drum brake, it gave up pretty quickly.  Luckily the little girls bike doesn’t go fast enough to need brakes..HA.

As far as upgrades to my 230, I have followed this forum religiously and all the awesome fanatics that share their knowledge and experiences to convert my little girls bike in a very reliable and competitive Enduro bike. I am a trial and error/test and tune type guy and always searching for mods and improvements ideas to make my 230 great for me and where I ride. Here is a short list of mods to my 230:

Suspension/chassis

Fox Podium RC2 shock, CRF150R USD forks, twisted engineering 3X bars, tall and soft gripper seat, IRC rear and Washougal DC front tires both with Tubliss and low air pressure, Scott’s damper, oversized foot pegs relocated for better ergos, light side stand, aluminum shifter (currently broker).

Engine

67mm BBR Piston, 4mm stroked crank, ST1.0 cam, very thin head/base gaskets, Head porting, PD03A pumper Carb, pro circuit full exhaust, 150F flywheel, delete judder spring, procom ignition, lithium battery.

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Every dog has his day you had yours Jeff well done love it. When the under dog wins its a great day.

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On ‎4‎/‎18‎/‎2018 at 10:27 PM, jeffrow68 said:

 I arrived with a good attitude and confidence even though it was a MUD fest.....

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AYE CARAMBA!!  Mud is unavoidable where I ride so I just go thru it.  I've never gotten that much build up though, even before the new fender and mods.  Good to know she won't overheat even with the entire front of the head covered.  

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Chris, I love the tubliss setup and have been using it on all of my bikes for a while. I am using a dual compound front tire at 6psi as recommended by BTR and I love it. Vulcanduro ve35 on rear at 8psi. No issues at all, but only positives such as much better control and noticeably softer ride. The power delivery of the 230 coupled with enhanced traction make me feel like I can do anything on this bike!

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17 hours ago, jeffrow68 said:

Thanks for the responses. It definitely feels weird racing on this vintage era bike, but I am riding faster and with more endurance than I ever have on a long list of modern race bikes.  It is hard to explain this transformation, even my riding friends are at a loss as to explain how I am kicking their asses on a trail bike.

Regarding overheating issues at the mud race, I don’t think I had any. I use always fresh Motul synthetic oil and change it frequently. My oil appeared used but not burnt or excessively fouled after the race. I was very hard on the clutch, and especially harder since I only had 2nd gear for the latter part of the race.  I will probably change the clutch over the summer just to be safe. The only real issue was the drum brake, it gave up pretty quickly.  Luckily the little girls bike doesn’t go fast enough to need brakes..HA.

As far as upgrades to my 230, I have followed this forum religiously and all the awesome fanatics that share their knowledge and experiences to convert my little girls bike in a very reliable and competitive Enduro bike. I am a trial and error/test and tune type guy and always searching for mods and improvements ideas to make my 230 great for me and where I ride. Here is a short list of mods to my 230:

Suspension/chassis

Fox Podium RC2 shock, CRF150R USD forks, twisted engineering 3X bars, tall and soft gripper seat, IRC rear and Washougal DC front tires both with Tubliss and low air pressure, Scott’s damper, oversized foot pegs relocated for better ergos, light side stand, aluminum shifter (currently broker).

Engine

67mm BBR Piston, 4mm stroked crank, ST1.0 cam, very thin head/base gaskets, Head porting, PD03A pumper Carb, pro circuit full exhaust, 150F flywheel, delete judder spring, procom ignition, lithium battery.

I have been looking at the twisted engineering bars.  Can you give a report on how they are to ride with, and if possible how much they weigh?

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Chad, for me the twisted engineering bars are very high on my list of recommended upgrades, if not the top.  I was struggling with arm pump and numb hands from CT when riding 2T bikes which was aggravated by the vibration. I initially used the Flexx bars but they were very heavy and only flexed in one plane. The twisted bars are very light and the flex in all directions. I have had the same pair for several years and I keep switching them over when I get a new bike.  You don’t notice the flex when riding, but man they work great for absorbing sharp hits and hard landings and even with vibration reduction. I am so used to these bars that I don’t like riding bikes without them, it is really a huge difference.  They are also very durable as I have tested this repeatedly.  The only downside is the price, pretty darn expensive but a mandatory upgrade for me to keep me in the saddle and somewhat safer.  I have the 3X flex version, just discovered they now have a 4X version which I may purchase for my DR650.

Please note that I did not get paid for this review, but if this somehow gets back to Twisted Engineering I will accept sponsorship to help advance my racing career!

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