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Anyone know if four mile is open?


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8 minutes ago, mrgem said:

They usually close part of the trails on Dec 15 and re-open on Apr 15. Some trails remain open year 'round. That said,the best way to find out for sure is to call the Ranger district down in Salida.

I think you can download a current MVUM for the district here:

https://www.fs.usda.gov/recarea/psicc/recreation/ohv/recarea/?recid=21414&actid=93

Thank you sir!

One of the few places in Colorado I have yet to check out, already downloaded the MVUM.

-Doc

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It is certainly one of my favorites. Close enough to the front range for a day trip yet relatively uncrowded when compared to areas like Rampart and Westcreek. They have a good variety of terrain -- so everyone, including beginners and kids (and old men like me), can find plenty of fun riding.

One thing I should remind everyone of though, is that much of the Pike and San Isabel Forests are threatened with the closure to motorized users. Several years ago, a half-dozen environmental groups sued the FS because many of the trails from Rampart to Four Mile had been open to OHVs without going through environmental impact review (NEPA). Because they were grandfathered (many had existed since the early part of the 20th century), the greenies challenged the authority of the FS and  BLM to declare these roads and trails open to motorized use without putting them through the NEPA environmental impact evaluation.

The FS, rather then resist this and allow it to go to trial, settled -- agreeing to put more than 500 miles of trails that had been in use for decades -- through the NEPA process.

 

The fact is, that the FS and BLM do not have any budget for litigation. Even though several motorized advocacy groups offered to back up the FS in court, they chose not to fight it -- because they didn't have the legal resources. Groups like TPA and COHVCO are doing what they can to protect motorized access -- but it will be tough -- as the environmental lobby has some very deep pockets. 

 

Forgive me for the rant...

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12 hours ago, mrgem said:

It is certainly one of my favorites. Close enough to the front range for a day trip yet relatively uncrowded when compared to areas like Rampart and Westcreek. They have a good variety of terrain -- so everyone, including beginners and kids (and old men like me), can find plenty of fun riding.

One thing I should remind everyone of though, is that much of the Pike and San Isabel Forests are threatened with the closure to motorized users. Several years ago, a half-dozen environmental groups sued the FS because many of the trails from Rampart to Four Mile had been open to OHVs without going through environmental impact review (NEPA). Because they were grandfathered (many had existed since the early part of the 20th century), the greenies challenged the authority of the FS and  BLM to declare these roads and trails open to motorized use without putting them through the NEPA environmental impact evaluation.

The FS, rather then resist this and allow it to go to trial, settled -- agreeing to put more than 500 miles of trails that had been in use for decades -- through the NEPA process.

 

The fact is, that the FS and BLM do not have any budget for litigation. Even though several motorized advocacy groups offered to back up the FS in court, they chose not to fight it -- because they didn't have the legal resources. Groups like TPA and COHVCO are doing what they can to protect motorized access -- but it will be tough -- as the environmental lobby has some very deep pockets. 

 

Forgive me for the rant...

Rant forgiven, I appreciate your concern for our sport! As for me I am teaching my kids to ride/respect the trails that we are so fortunate to have. It is my sincere hope that they may have the opportunities to ride anything other than a track or private land. The way things are going, I'm not too sure!

I grew up riding in Utah. First bike was a '74 Honda MR50. My Dad raced desert on an Ossa 250 Phantom. We used to go ride Southern Utah in what is now Canyon Lands NP. Slick rock trail was cut in by motorcycles. Every time I have been back over the last 40 years, access keeps shrinking. I understand part of the problem is the increase in use of our public lands...there is an increasingly smaller slice of the pie for all to enjoy. The immediate solvable problem for OHV right now it seems to me is irresponsible operators. I just can't believe some of the !#$% I see people doing out there these days.( I caught some knucklehead trying to get his quad up the first part of overlook trail two weeks ago)The more difficult part is the political problem of vast western lands subject to various federal jurisdictions.

Thanks for the info MG,

and I strongly urge anyone who loves this sport to get involved...

-Doc

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I think just about everyone has seen - and been concerned about-- other motorized trail users that give us all a bad name. Education, education, education...

We also must learn to share what you describe as an "Increasingly Smaller slice of the pie." Like it or not EVERYONE has a right to lawfully use public land. And we are all going to have to accommodate the others.

The equestrians, hikers, bicyclists and motorized folks all have to share not only a smaller "slice" but a pie that itself is shrinking as huge pieces of federal land are made off limits to all but a handful of the eco-elite.

Utah is a prime example of government land reservations that have to be shared by all kinds of recreationists. 

http://www.coloradotpa.org/2017/05/05/2016-ride-with-respect/

Groups like TPA, BRC, COHVCO, Ride with Respect (a Utah group doing great work) need your support. Otherwise the pie and the slices are going to shrink even more.

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