Whopharded

High Speed Compression Damping

8 posts in this topic

I'm about par for coming up short doubles until I get committed to clear them... and it hurts like hell.  I thought last weekend I had broken my ankle, I'd hit so hard.

I light of, I'm considering adjusting my damping to soak the hit up a little better.  Question:  On a jump landing, does that type of impact reflect on High Speed Compression Damping?

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Certainly is a high speed event but you can only expect much from your suspension if you're shorting big jumps.  Part of the hit is the deceleration from the impact, no getting around that. 

Better suspension will help alleviate the penalty of over jumping much more effectively than it can absorb your wheels coming down on the wrong side of the landing ramp.  Then you can err on the long side rather than short until you get it dialed in.

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On 5/2/2018 at 2:59 PM, Whopharded said:

I'm about par for coming up short doubles until I get committed to clear them... and it hurts like hell.  I thought last weekend I had broken my ankle, I'd hit so hard.

I light of, I'm considering adjusting my damping to soak the hit up a little better.  Question:  On a jump landing, does that type of impact reflect on High Speed Compression Damping?

I have always been told that is a low speed comp event.

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17 minutes ago, ring ding ding said:

I have always been told that is a low speed comp event.

A properly executed jump should be low speed - sink into the ramp, fly, gently sink back into the landing.

When you over or under jump, there is a huge step change in wheel velocity - you're flying through the air at full droop, then all of a sudden your wheel hits the lip or you are going into the ground at a less than tangent angle and you use up all the stroke in a fraction of a second.  Very much high speed.  

Lots of energy there though, can only absorb so much before your suspension is too stiff everywhere else.

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From Factory Connection:
"Examples of High Shaft Speed obstacles: square edged bumps, slap down landings, lipped out jump faces, logs. Examples of Low Shaft Speed obstacles:rolling bumps/whoops, steep jump faces."

I'd consider coming up short on a jump to be similar to a slap-down. In essence, I wouldn't suggest tuning your suspension (via clickers) to absorb these type of impacts with ease as it will adversely affect your suspension for all other situations. In order to focus on bottoming control, you'll need to actually dive into your shim stacks and optionally upgrade your bottoming cones. If you're completely blowing through your stroke even on successful jumps, then I'd stiffen up your clickers a bit.

Edited by rusky
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16 minutes ago, rusky said:

From Factory Connection:
"Examples of High Shaft Speed obstacles: square edged bumps, slap down landings, lipped out jump faces, logs. Examples of Low Shaft Speed obstacles:rolling bumps/whoops, steep jump faces."

I'd consider coming up short on a jump to be similar to a slap-down. In essence, I wouldn't suggest tuning your suspension (via clickers) to absorb these type of impacts with ease as it will adversely affect your suspension for all other situations. In order to focus on bottoming control, you'll need to actually dive into your shim stacks and optionally upgrade your bottoming cones. If you're completely blowing through your stroke even on successful jumps, then I'd stiffen up your clickers a bit.

That's where I ended up on the topic.  The bike does way too well everywhere else on the track to compromise for just landings.   I did up the tire pressure and it made a noticeable difference.   Since posted, I am jumping farther.  Maybe not clearing everything but far enough to make it less painful.

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