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Clearing a small log in 3rd or 4th gear (open section)

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I have been trying to go over a log at a decent speed in a flat section on a trail.

Sometimes it goes great and sometimes its real scary.  I can't figure out what is working and what is not.  I haven't measured the log but its maybe 12" - 18"  around.  Maybe about top of boot high.

I have tried leaning back and letting the front wheel hit it with some success. 

I have tried lifting the front wheel and only the back wheel hits the log.  This works GREAT sometimes.  The other times it shoots the rear end up real hard.

What am I not figuring out?

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If you can hit an 18” log in 4th gear without dying, you should be racing endurocross

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Just now, gabe_k said:

If you can hit an 18” log in 4th gear without dying, you should be racing endurocross

LOL... In 4th gear.  Not the Top of 4th gear.  I have no idea how many MPH I am talking about,  but it's pretty quick.  would probably be near rev limiter in 2nd?

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Maybe I should just drag the log off the trail.

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3 hours ago, gabe_k said:

If you can hit an 18” log in 4th gear without dying, you should be racing endurocross

Or even 3rd. 18" can be tricky for anyone and 12s aren't always piece of cake.

Edited by ring ding ding

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13 hours ago, joemc04 said:

I have been trying to go over a log at a decent speed in a flat section on a trail.

Sometimes it goes great and sometimes its real scary.  I can't figure out what is working and what is not.  I haven't measured the log but its maybe 12" - 18"  around.  Maybe about top of boot high.

I have tried leaning back and letting the front wheel hit it with some success. 

I have tried lifting the front wheel and only the back wheel hits the log.  This works GREAT sometimes.  The other times it shoots the rear end up real hard.

What am I not figuring out?

That's a big log for 4th gear... Not so sure the size of the log or the speed. Either way..

If you are trying to hit a log, at any speed, or bigger logs, you are going to weight the rear, and hop the log. Keep your weight back until your rear tire climbs the log, and start to transfer your weight. 

are you sure it was in 4th gear?

What is your gearing?

 

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15 hours ago, joemc04 said:

LOL... In 4th gear.  Not the Top of 4th gear.  I have no idea how many MPH I am talking about,  but it's pretty quick.  would probably be near rev limiter in 2nd?

Why? Why would you be trying to hit a log of that size with that much speed? Racing you certainly wouldn't as the risk of losing control on exit is too great. Entrance speed is almost always dictated by how fast you can exit, meaning that those that learn how to exit turns, obstacles, etc. the fastest will usually be faster than riders who come in to these too hot. Controlled exits are one of the things that make pro's fast. Goes hand in hand with the ole cliche "wow, they make that look easy". They don't take unnecessary risks and hitting a log that big at the kind of speeds you are talking about is most likely an unnecessary risk although I am speculating as we have not seen it.

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57 minutes ago, crankee said:

Why? Why would you be trying to hit a log of that size with that much speed? Racing you certainly wouldn't as the risk of losing control on exit is too great. Entrance speed is almost always dictated by how fast you can exit, meaning that those that learn how to exit turns, obstacles, etc. the fastest will usually be faster than riders who come in to these too hot. Controlled exits are one of the things that make pro's fast. Goes hand in hand with the ole cliche "wow, they make that look easy". They don't take unnecessary risks and hitting a log that big at the kind of speeds you are talking about is most likely an unnecessary risk although I am speculating as we have not seen it.

No one is hitting a 18in log in 4th...Maybe mid range in 2nd, but far from 4th...

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You guys are getting distracted by my really poorly worded question.

I am not doing some amazing log crossing, it is nothing worth watching and I am not going that fast.  

I am riding a gear or two high (3rd or 4th). I am on a 250fx with stock gearing.  2nd would have pretty high rpms if I were in second. 

The log is around boot height.  I estimated it would be around 12 to 18 inches around.  Not atleast 18" tall.  

I wish I asked the question like this:  "I am finally able to go over a log really slow,  I am trying to go faster now because this log is in an open section.  When I go fast sometimes the rear end kicked up very hard and throws me around violently.  What can I do?"

Your answers have been helpful though.  I haven't watched a lot of endurocross.   I watched some videos of the pros, and they are WAY father back on the seat after hitting the logs.  I am going to give this a try.  I also rewatched the cross training enduro video on log crossing.  He says the higher the wheelie the more the rear suspension is going to work. I was worried too high would make this worse.  

Any other suggestions or comments would be helpful.

Sorry my question made it sound like I was doing something cool or worth seeing. 

Edited by joemc04
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3 hours ago, crankee said:

Why? Why would you be trying to hit a log of that size with that much speed? Racing you certainly wouldn't as the risk of losing control on exit is too great. Entrance speed is almost always dictated by how fast you can exit, meaning that those that learn how to exit turns, obstacles, etc. the fastest will usually be faster than riders who come in to these too hot. Controlled exits are one of the things that make pro's fast. Goes hand in hand with the ole cliche "wow, they make that look easy". They don't take unnecessary risks and hitting a log that big at the kind of speeds you are talking about is most likely an unnecessary risk although I am speculating as we have not seen it.

Your right. The fastest way through this section probably is to work on my braking and accelerating before and after the log. 

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29 minutes ago, joemc04 said:

You guys are getting distracted by my really poorly worded question.

I am not doing some amazing log crossing, it is nothing worth watching and I am not going that fast.  

I am riding a gear or two high (3rd or 4th). I am on a 250fx with stock gearing.  2nd would have pretty high rpms if I were in second. 

The log is around boot height.  I estimated it would be around 12 to 18 inches around.  Not atleast 18" tall.  

I wish I asked the question like this:  "I am finally able to go over a log really slow,  I am trying to go faster now because this log is in an open section.  When I go fast sometimes the rear end kicked up very hard and throws me around violently.  What can I do?"

Your answers have been helpful though.  I haven't watched a lot of endurocross.   I watched some videos of the pros, and they are WAY father back on the seat after hitting the logs.  I am going to give this a try.  I also rewatched the cross training enduro video on log crossing.  He says the higher the wheelie the more the rear suspension is going to work. I was worried too high would make this worse.  

Any other suggestions or comments would be helpful.

Sorry my question made it sound like I was doing something cool or worth seeing. 

I don't think anyone was getting at you, more or less so poking fun. Yes, like I said above, getting over that rear wheel is important. Get back on it, ride the right gear. Don't ride the gear just for the log, but what is after the log. The difference between fast guys and slow guys are the exits like Crankee said.

 

Stay over the rear wheel, get the bike up a bit, doesnt have to be extremely high, then transition for the exit.

 

ANOTHER BIG THING, your suspension settings. Are you set up correctly? weight, etc? if not, fix it. set your sag etc.. it is one of the most important set ups to have.

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Just now, joey330 said:

I don't think anyone was getting at you, more or less so poking fun. Yes, like I said above, getting over that rear wheel is important. Get back on it, ride the right gear. Don't ride the gear just for the log, but what is after the log. The difference between fast guys and slow guys are the exits like Crankee said.

 

Stay over the rear wheel, get the bike up a bit, doesnt have to be extremely high, then transition for the exit.

 

ANOTHER BIG THING, your suspension settings. Are you set up correctly? weight, etc? if not, fix it. set your sag etc.. it is one of the most important set ups to have.

Thank you.  I keep saying I am going to set up sag because everyone on line makes it sound really important,  but no,   bought the bike and haven't changed sag or clicked a clicker.  I thought I should learn how to ride first.  I was worried I would compensate for really poor riding by making my bike match my bad habits. I probably have gotten good enough I should try to make adjustments now. 

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You start talking about height(boot) and then switch to circumference(round). Make up your mind, words matter.

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Just now, joemc04 said:

Thank you.  I keep saying I am going to set up sag because everyone on line makes it sound really important,  but no,   bought the bike and haven't changed sag or clicked a clicker.  I thought I should learn how to ride first.  I was worried I would compensate for really poor riding by making my bike match my bad habits. I probably have gotten good enough I should try to make adjustments now. 

The reason it is pounded in peoples heads is because it doesnt matter if you are new, or a 20 Yr vet.

Suspension is set to the riders weight and such for a reason. Honestly, not setting your suspension up properly, means you may be gaining bad habits to compensate for shitty bike suspension. It WILL help you achieve better results, faster hops, better leaps, and overall ride ability as you get better. Not to mention.. The best way to get better on any given bike, is to tailor it to yourself. After you get things set up, you will overtime tweak and find the settings you like, tires you like, bars, pegs, shifters, levers, etc.. 

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I don't think it helps that this particular log is on a trail where it is frowned upon for turning around and rehitting a section.  The owner really likes everyone on the trail and going the right direction. After I go over this log I won't see this log for another 20-30 minutes.  After 3 or 4 laps I am pretty exhausted.

I think I going to try to recreate this log somewhere else where I can do whatever I want. 

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Just now, joemc04 said:

I don't think it helps that this particular log is on a trail where it is frowned upon for turning around and rehitting a section.  The owner really likes everyone on the trail and going the right direction. After I go over this log I won't see this log for another 20-30 minutes.  After 3 or 4 laps I am pretty exhausted.

I think I going to try to recreate this log somewhere else where I can do whatever I want. 

If you have a place to do that, good idea. Also don't get so caught up on one log. There are many logs that you should be practicing on. Mix it up, don't be a 1 trick pony. In races, I have been 1 lap, came back around, and OHH F** there is a log that came down, time to adjust!

Or go at a time/day where no one else is out there, and you will be fine. On dead days most owners wouldn't have a problem with it.

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1 minute ago, joey330 said:

If you have a place to do that, good idea. Also don't get so caught up on one log. There are many logs that you should be practicing on. Mix it up, don't be a 1 trick pony. In races, I have been 1 lap, came back around, and OHH F** there is a log that came down, time to adjust!

Or go at a time/day where no one else is out there, and you will be fine. On dead days most owners wouldn't have a problem with it.

Thank you for the advice.  I think I am hung up on this one log because it throws me around real violently.  After that my confidence takes a dive for 10 minutes or so.  My confidence being low ruins the next section and I start over running turns and hitting trees or washing out my front end.  Maybe I will just take it easy on this log for awhile. 

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Thank you for the advice.  I think I am hung up on this one log because it throws me around real violently.  After that my confidence takes a dive for 10 minutes or so.  My confidence being low ruins the next section and I start over running turns and hitting trees or washing out my front end.  Maybe I will just take it easy on this log for awhile. 
Dont let it get to you. Keep your head up and eyes forward. Keep at it and others and you will get better.

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The FX has a high rear end that likes to kick. Most people either get a lowering link or have the shock lowered when having their suspension done. For now set high speed compression on the shock at 2 turns out from full in. The blue nut on the shock is the high speed adjuster.

Aggressive riders and racers are liking a 104-105 sag and the forks up 4-5mm.  More casual riders seem to prefer their sag in the 108-110 range. 

 

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