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Let's see some course marking gear and tricks. 

I have seen people use satchel/quivers/wtf to carry lath and flagging, flagging on clothes pins, and that's about it. 

 

I carry rolls flagging on my the front straps of my pack, but that's about the only trick I have at the moment.  I am just getting ready to go gather up some course and I am going to be trying to rig up an old back pack for lathe and flagging.  If it works I will take a picture. 

I have been trying to discourage the use of quads for courses marking to avoid the temptation to widen single track. 

I want to see some of you alls stuff for doing the task.

 

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Just where do you plan to do this course marking????! First I hope it's on your land? Second if not I hope you have written notarized permission document? If you got all that then get you a hammer stapler plus a box of staples and a bunch of arrows. You need 4 pouches strapped to the handle bars One pouch for red arrows. one for white, one for stapler and box of staples, forth for small hatchet.  Always mark a back azimuth! Like when you start put a red arrow on the front side of tree and the a white arrow on back side. Naturally put the arrows where their visible!! This will come in handy for riding a loop in reverse or at least finding your way back out on the same trail. Duck between tree's a handle bar width in hopes to keep out the 4 wheeler's!!!! 30 inches! 

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4 hours ago, OLHILLBILLY said:

They just nail red arrows to trees here.. 

Trees can be rare places, besides are trees are usually more like large bushes.  We run a lot of dry washes that don't have trees, but do have some hidden hazards that you pretty much have to mark with lathe.

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3 hours ago, piltoyougram said:

Just where do you plan to do this course marking????! First I hope it's on your land? Second if not I hope you have written notarized permission document? If you got all that then get you a hammer stapler plus a box of staples and a bunch of arrows. You need 4 pouches strapped to the handle bars One pouch for red arrows. one for white, one for stapler and box of staples, forth for small hatchet.  Always mark a back azimuth! Like when you start put a red arrow on the front side of tree and the a white arrow on back side. Naturally put the arrows where their visible!! This will come in handy for riding a loop in reverse or at least finding your way back out on the same trail. Duck between tree's a handle bar width in hopes to keep out the 4 wheeler's!!!! 30 inches! 

They are AMA compliant NH&H, GP, HS, P2P, and now sprint enduros. 

I like the pouch idea, got any pics?

We use reversible arrows that are B&W wrong way on one side, and orange arrow on the other.   Yellow caution tape is used to block side routes, and amazingly people will ride through it and keep going.

We never ride course backwards, even when marking and cleaning. 

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Staple arrows to trees and orange paint for danger spots with x. I walk my loop and use a back pack to carry it all.

 

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Mostly stakes with flagging on it.  Usually allowed 10-20ft to either side of the stakes, if there's some feature you want to go around.  Staff will add time if you shortcut off-course; may not even see them watching.

One race, there was a single-track on an elevated trail with a small valley/drainage that parallels the trail just below.  Trail was whooped out, hard to ride/control.  Lap 1 I took the trail, rest of the laps I dropped down into the drainage and was able to ride much faster through that section.  Still within the ±distance of the stakes in there, but if I were to go around the trees on teh bottom of the hillside where it was clear I've have gotten time added.

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Occasional spray-painted or snow marker ink indicating which direction to go.

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More consequential areas get flagged heavier - caution tape, signs/arrows.  Blowing through(or around) this corner would have put you into oncoming race traffic.

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The longer courses where the direction you go at the intersection changes based on how many laps you've done (come in, hang a right, run that loop, back on the main trail again, back to the intersection again, then instead of hanging a left you go straight sort of things) usually station a few volunteers there as a checkpoint/rider assist.  They'll check off your number on their score sheet and point you which direction to go. 

Since these course layouts are longer, if there's a safety issue (mechanical, injury) it's nice to have that support at locations through the course.  Passed one rider with a blown engine on the side of the trail, helmet-tap to make sure he was okay, then let the staff at the next checkpoint a few miles ahead know there's a rider stopped back there.

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"Hidden" hazards (stuff you may not see riding at race pace) are marked with crossed stakes....

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...or simply highlighted orange.  Both of those also serve as course markers.

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For east coast trees, brush, and soft dirt, I have a whole array of pouches, implements, arrows, ribbon, etc. for course workdays. I'm afraid I have little to offer in a rock and desert type environment. FWIW, a deep pocket tool belt , and a canvas bag with a shoulder strap can handle most trail marking needs on a bike. I'm not a fan of backpacks for items because they're awkward for quick accessibility on the trail, plus I usually have a hydration pack in its place.

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On 5/20/2018 at 0:56 PM, crypto666 said:

Trees can be rare places, besides are trees are usually more like large bushes.  We run a lot of dry washes that don't have trees, but do have some hidden hazards that you pretty much have to mark with lathe.

Lathe's can get quite heavy after a few hours in the saddle.

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1 hour ago, ring ding ding said:

Lathe's can get quite heavy after a few hours in the saddle.

It is, but what better way to take a 24" log and turn it in to a 1.5" x 1/4" x 36" piece of wood?

I guess it would be better to just take some laths.  I guess.    

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3 hours ago, ring ding ding said:

Lathe's can get quite heavy after a few hours in the saddle.

This one will bungee right onto the front fender. :rolleyes:

9768552c764dd727b0386fef8c0f4b4b.jpg.f894aa1abf9565a77b78cbead126fbba.jpg

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