Spartan077

Yz125 for woods

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First new topic! 

Any one ride a 125 or 200 for woods/trails and want to discuss pros and cons?

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I’ve ridden a ‘00 YZ 125 in the mountains.  It does ok if you don’t have to climb any steep technical trails.

They just don’t have the bottom end grunt to get up some things, without being in the power band.

If you want a decent small woods bike, I’d go with a CRF230 or a TTR230 or XR200 or 250.  If you like jumping and such I’d go with a 2 stroke 250 then throw a gnarly pipe on it with a flywheel weight and then gear it for trails.

Choosing a bike really depends on what you want to do with it.  

In my opinion a 125 2stroke is only good for a track, or flat land woods style riding.

Good luck in whatever you do.

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13 hours ago, Spartan077 said:

Thanks !

Welcome, when it comes to woods riding with a 125 he probably is the most seasoned. Don’t listen to 4 stroke overweight underpowered talk. That is pure nonsense...

Any bike can be ridden in any condition with the right rider and set up. 

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I live in the mountains of East TN, I ride a yz125 in the woods, love it. It has gotten me up some steep crappy stuff. That said you do have to commit and work it on the nasty stuff and it can be a little tiring but it's so rewarding. I often wonder if the people who act as though a 125 is incapable of anything have ever rode one... There is some merit to the no bottom end. But they've got decent midrange and plenty on the top side. A few little mods like playing with the rear gearing and she'll go alright. The pro's are it being light weight, cheap to buy, just all around fun as can be to ride, cheap maintenance.

The cons are no bottom end so more clutch work, more frequent maintenance such as topends as compared to bigger 2t's. That's about it for me. But someone like rpt50 and many others here are VASTLY more skilled and knowledgeable than me.

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2 minutes ago, Renegade90 said:

I live in the mountains of East TN, I ride a yz125 in the woods, love it. It has gotten me up some steep crappy stuff. That said you do have to commit and work it on the nasty stuff and it can be a little tiring but it's so rewarding. I often wonder if the people who act as though a 125 is incapable of anything have ever rode one... There is some merit to the no bottom end. But they've got decent midrange and plenty on the top side. A few little mods like playing with the rear gearing and she'll go alright. The pro's are it being light weight, cheap to buy, just all around fun as can be to ride, cheap maintenance.

The cons are no bottom end so more clutch work, more frequent maintenance such as topends as compared to bigger 2t's. That's about it for me. But someone like rpt50 and many others here are VASTLY more skilled and knowledgeable than me.

It all comes down to what you most typically ride and what you're willing to accept, input wise, to your motorcycle to get you there. Yes, I owned a 125 two years ago - rode it a few times and decided it wasn't for me.

Rpt50 likes his but that doesn't make it universally appealing to everyone else. 125 threads are like oil threads. Pretty much haters and lovers and nothing in between. :busted:

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1 minute ago, shrubitup said:

It all comes down to what you most typically ride and what you're willing to accept, input wise, to your motorcycle to get you there. Yes, I owned a 125 two years ago - rode it a few times and decided it wasn't for me.

Rpt50 likes his but that doesn't make it universally appealing to everyone else. 125 threads are like oil threads. Pretty much haters and lovers and nothing in between. :busted:

Oh no I'm not saying a 125 is undeserving of critique, there is no perfect bike. I'm more or less talking about people who seriously undermine the capability of the bikes. The small bore 2t's are definitely for the aggressive riding style (at least for technical climbs), far from perfect. 

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Posted (edited)

pros: light and nimble, and very quick turning, fun factor of infinity, very aggressive feel without all the risks of a larger bore 2 stroke.

cons: no low end, needs to be wrung out to move quick, not great in sand, muddy, or slick surfaces where traction can be an issue, harder to cover up mistakes, gearing choice is very important, need good clutch skills, they do best in trails that flow well, technical terrain and hill climbs can be more challenging.

there really are no cons to the 125 or 150 in the woods when fun is the goal, the only cons are really if you are trying to race it.  they are an absolute blast to ride.

Edited by talkingrain
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Posted (edited)

3 minutes ago, Renegade90 said:

Oh no I'm not saying a 125 is undeserving of critique, there is no perfect bike. I'm more or less talking about people who seriously undermine the capability of the bikes. The small bore 2t's are definitely for the aggressive riding style (at least for technical climbs), far from perfect. 

Many riders are at the point of capability wise where they CAN take a KLR650 or a YZ125 anywhere and get somewhere and have fun doing it. Both bikes will go anywhere it's just which one (or others) you most prefer to utilize.

Edited by shrubitup
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I’m curious what a 167 kit would be like compared to a 250 riding single track/harescrambles. 

Anyone ride a yz 167?

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Here is some more food for thought, and everyone has their own tastes so here it is.

The 125 and 250 are only slightly different in weight.

Contrary to most opinions the 250 actually sits about 1/2” lower than a 125 (at least that goes for the CR line)

Clutch maintenance is going to be much higher if you ride it trying to get over steeper more technical stuff; you’ll be slipping it much more to keep the revs up where the 125 makes power.  Doing so produces much more heat and wear.

If that’s how you like to ride then go for it.

Now for the 250.  They can recover from mishaps much better.  They can more easily lift the front tire when you need it.  That is a must when you ride more technical stuff.  The better low end power makes it possible to get back on the power without slipping the clutch; you’re clutch will thank you.

There are a lot of people who say that there is no perfect bike.  They are right to an extent.  However I think a 250 is a great bike for all around fun.

They are light enough to flip around, powerful enough to push through steep, muddy, rocky, sand, and track environments.

Yeah they can’t hold top speeds like the bigger bikes, but since there can’t be a perfect bike; I think this is a good runner up.

 

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Ha ha this is a great thread--so many conflicting opinions!  

Regarding the 125 vs. 250 debate, the solution is easy, just have both!  As a guy that has both however, I find the 125 a lot more fun to ride, so much so that my 250 collects dust, and I need to have TWO 125s as I am riding them so much (at least that's what I told the wife). 

I will make a couple of observations based on what others have said.  Regarding maintenance, I kind of feel like the 125 might be a little cheaper to operate than a 250, but it is certainly not more expensive.  A woods-ridden 125 does not need top-end work as much as you might think (I have detailed my routine on this forum), and 125s seem to be much easier on the consumables (tires, brakes, rotors, drive parts, etc.).  I am pleasantly surprised at how little I end up spending hammering my 125s every chance I get!

As far as speed, I don't think a 125 is at a general disadvantage in woods riding and even woods racing here in the east.  Sure there are situations where a 125 is not ideal (like a long climb with momentum sapping obstacles), but they can whip through the trees like nothing else.  I find that people beat me in races or get away from me on the trail because they are better riders, not because they have more cc.  Now if we are talking MX it is a different story.  

Anyway, to the OP, just pin the throttle and keep the revs up, and you will have a blast on a 125 in the woods.  And if you don't like it, sell it and get something else!

 

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Planning on a 250 for my next winter build. 

I do own a kdx250 in nice shape. Little heavy but lots of grunt! 

 

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I raced enduro's a 08 YZ144  for two years lots of fun. It was a 144 because the cylinder and head were junk when I bought it, never rode it as a 125.

I did NOT run a FWW but did add 2 teeth to the rear. You need to be a active rider on the small bores.

I was 50 yrs old and over 200 lbs.

The smile will never leave your face!! 

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I own a ktm 200 xcw. Its very good in the wood. It got good low end power, strong mid-range and explosive top end. The power is very flexible. It very nimble and effortless to turn. It eat up single track all day. It flow very fast in the wood. Its a great bike for sure.

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I’ve always wanted to try out a ktm 200

my first bike at 13 was a RMX250. I should have never sold it!!

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20 minutes ago, Spartan077 said:

I’ve always wanted to try out a ktm 200

my first bike at 13 was a RMX250. I should have never sold it!!

Sorry. First bike was a KD80

i bought the RMX250 myself at 13 😎

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The only issue riding a 125 in technical terrain is the diesels litterin the trail killing your momentum.

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