Jump to content

Alta Motors Announces the 2019 Redshift EXR

Recommended Posts

Offering more power and capability than ever before, the Redshift EXR empowers riders with the control and confidence to ride faster, safer and smoother

2019-Alta-Motors-Redshift-EXR-678.jpg

BRISBANE, CA – June 13, 2018  – (Motor Sports Newswire) –  Alta Motors, the leader in high-performance electric motorcycles, today announced the release of its highly-anticipated Redshift EXR. The 2019 Redshift EXR is the ideal multi-terrain motorcycle for the performance enthusiast, but equally intuitive and easy to ride for beginners. It recently made a clandestine global debut at the notorious Erzberg Rodeo and made history as the first electric bike to ever qualify for the main event. Ty Tremaine positioned his EXR on the front row in 43rd position, ahead of 457 other bikes, proving the EXR’s performance in the most extreme race conditions.

2019-Alta-Motors-Redshift-EXR-LEFTSIDE.jpg

Quote

“The Redshift EXR climbs ridiculously well,” said Ty Tremaine. “Even on the most treacherous trails, like the Iron Mountain, its really intuitive and easy to control. Hands down, this is the best enduro bike on the market, and a lot of fun to ride.”

Alta created a bike that can be ridden to local trails and unleashed to flow through off-road obstacles and effortlessly conquer even the most daunting hill climbs. Impossible to stall and incredibly sure-footed, the EXR is a purebred, single-track slayer with street legal capabilities. As a zero-emission, street legal dirt bike, the Redshift EXR has full access to all areas that permit off-highway vehicles, regardless of the season. With minimal engine noise, the riding experience heightens the rider’s senses to the terrain around them while promoting responsible land usage.

2019-Alta-Motors-Redshift-EXR-2.jpg

The 2019 Redshift EXR will be available at over 60 dealerships nationwide midyear.

Key Features and Benefits

R-Pack
Building off of Alta’s industry-leading A-pack technology, the highest-energy density battery ever put in a motorcycle, the new R-Pack represents the next evolution in battery performance. Alta’s new R-Pack utilizes state-of-the-art cell chemistry that delivers extended full-power range at cooler operating temperatures. The Redshift platform’s firmware and software upgrades result in more range, increased power and faster charge times, making the 2019 EXR one of the most capable multi-terrain motorcycles available.

Electronics
Alta’s proprietary software is developed to be lean and elegant. The company’s development cycles are extremely fast and have enabled Alta to create the most refined throttle feel in the industry as well as swiftly release new controls and capabilities. Four unique performance maps allow the rider to change the power delivery character, engine braking freewheel, and flywheel effects. The Open loop “rate of change” torque control has a response rate of 5,000Hz, yielding the closest thing to “theoretically perfect” torque control yet achieved in the motorcycle industry. The seamless drive technology lets you focus on the terrain and the obstacles rather than what the engine clutch and transmission need from you. This means more of your attention is on the ride.

Full Specs: 2019 Alta Redshift EXR

  • Top Speed 71 MPH
  • Power 50hp, 42 ft-lbs
  • Charge Time 1.5 Hrs (240v) 3 Hrs (120v)
  • Front Tire Metzeler 6 Days 80/100-21
  • Rear Tire Metzeler 6 Days 120/90-18
  • Forks WP Xplor 48
  • Shock WP Alta Custom Spec
  • Front Brake Brembo 260mm rotor, Brembo dual piston caliper
  • Rear Brake Brembo 220mm rotor, Brembo single piston caliper
  • Curb Weight (wet) 273 pounds
  • Wheelbase 58.75 in
  • Seat Height 36.5 in
  • Rake 26.3º
  • Trail 113 mm
  • Triple Clamp 18/22 mm adj
  • Handguards Cycra Stealth
  • MSRP $12,495

 

About Alta Motors

Alta Motors is a global leader in lightweight electric vehicles with a proprietary mobility platform that offers new levels of power density and economics. It leads the industry with a complete portfolio of battery and drivetrain components, an existing fleet of lightweight vehicles manufactured at its world-class Brisbane, California, facility and a full customer backlog. Alta’s award-winning Redshift platform is now available to riders at over 60 U.S. dealerships across the United States. Please visit us at: altamotors.co
alta-motors-banner.jpg

2019-Alta-Motors-Redshift-EXR-LEFTSIDE.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Extended range? How far can it go? Can it be charged at one of the EV charging stations that are popping up all over?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, Benny Mac said:

Extended range? How far can it go? Can it be charged at one of the EV charging stations that are popping up all over?

Alta quotes:

  • 50 commuting miles
  • 4+ hours of trail riding
  • 3+ 25 minute heats
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alta quotes:
  • 50 commuting miles
  • 4+ hours of trail riding
  • 3+ 25 minute heats
Not bad.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, Benny Mac said:
40 minutes ago, Bryan Bosch said:
Alta quotes:
  • 50 commuting miles
  • 4+ hours of trail riding
  • 3+ 25 minute heats

Not bad.

I certainly think so too. If you live in a good weather climate, I'd commute on one. Average car is what, over 35k these days? If I lived in a more urban environment, I think one of these could pencil out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I certainly think so too. If you live in a good weather climate, I'd commute on one. Average car is what, over 35k these days? If I lived in a more urban environment, I think one of these could pencil out.
I commute 25 miles one way but my company has EV chargers all over the property. The question I don't know the answer to , is the charging cable huge or will it fit in a backpack? Or is it integrated into the bike somehow like the cars are? I think they're pretty trick and would love to try one out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very cool I had not paid much attention to off road ebikes before.  I would consider one down the road.  

Things I would be interested in seeing:

-get rid of the chain and central motor, put motors on the rear and front axle/hubs.

-regenerative braking

-option for an auxiliary battery for occasions where range is desired over performance.

 

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, Benny Mac said:
30 minutes ago, Bryan Bosch said:
I certainly think so too. If you live in a good weather climate, I'd commute on one. Average car is what, over 35k these days? If I lived in a more urban environment, I think one of these could pencil out.

I commute 25 miles one way but my company has EV chargers all over the property. The question I don't know the answer to , is the charging cable huge or will it fit in a backpack? Or is it integrated into the bike somehow like the cars are? I think they're pretty trick and would love to try one out.

https://issuu.com/altamotors1/docs/redshiftmx_ownersmanual_final

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll consider one that will last all day, so long as it's no heavier than my WR.  Until then electric bikes are simply pointless for trail riding.  Looks tidy though and obviously will suit part timers or those with vans and trailers.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The claims of range...

I hear the previous gen only had a 20 mile range when ridden on hard enduro?

 

That bike looks just like a 501... I've heard they are super awesome to ride. But I want reliable 50 mile range for hard enduro.  

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

2 hours ago, Benny Mac said:
2 hours ago, Bryan Bosch said:
I certainly think so too. If you live in a good weather climate, I'd commute on one. Average car is what, over 35k these days? If I lived in a more urban environment, I think one of these could pencil out.

I commute 25 miles one way but my company has EV chargers all over the property. The question I don't know the answer to , is the charging cable huge or will it fit in a backpack? Or is it integrated into the bike somehow like the cars are? I think they're pretty trick and would love to try one out.

Per Alta:

Quote

Alta CS Agent:

Unfortunately our bikes are not J-1772 compatible, even with an adapter.  There are two chargers that will work with EXR.  Our Standard charger for $499 and our Rapid charger for $799.  The Rapid charger charges the bike about 30 minutes faster at 240VAC than the Standard charger.  The Rapid charger also has a superior, easy to carry case with improved weather resistance and cable management.

I asked them if they had the ability to use public charging stations, so I assume those are generally J-1772 spec? I own no electric bikes or cars, so greek to me. 

I believe this is a J-1772 charging cord and socket:

sae-j1772c.jpg

I'm sure they are smart enough to have considered why this compatibility would be good, but maybe there is some technical issue I'm not aware of?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I asked them if they had the ability to use public charging stations, so I assume those are generally J-1772 spec? I own no electric bikes or cars, so greek to me. 
Greek to me as well. I just see these charging stations going in all over the place up here in CT. I just assumed the charging was the same. Well that sucks! These are very chic and cool but if it can't be charged anywhere but home it's a no go for me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just reached out to a local dealer and talked to the owner, who happens to be a TT member! I'm going to get some time on an EXR when he gets them, maybe 30-45 days. Nice gentleman and he said prepare to be seriously impressed. I'll report back if/when that happens. I"m interested in the experience for sure.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The specs give charge ratings for 120 and 240, so I would hope it comes with your choice of (or user configurable) common household plug.  My air compressor was like that, came as 120v, but I had the option to change a wire in the motor and rewire it with a 240 plug.

 

Edited by john170950

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unfortunately you wouldn't want to go any farther offroad than you'd be willing to push it back when the batteries ran down.    :lol:  Wait until you hear the price of a replacement battery , when the time comes.    :foul:   

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Unfortunately you wouldn't want to go any farther offroad than you'd be willing to push it back when the batteries ran down.    :lol:  Wait until you hear the price of a replacement battery , when the time comes.    :foul:   

This!

I rode the previous model at a demo for a few minutes at Hollister. Very impressive. Plenty of torque, accelerates smoothly, front end comes up in a predictable manor.

Seems decent for a closed track but I wouldn't ride it too far from the truck.

Pushing this bike more than a few hundred feet would definitely suck.

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, djl2014 said:

 

Pushing this bike more than a few hundred feet would definitely suck.

 

 

 

Pushing any bike sucks.:excuseme:

Just read up on how it’s got more drag while pushing. I stand corrected!!!:thumbsup:

Edited by MANIAC998
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

4+ hours of I assume casual trail riding isn't bad at all. I still think in a couple of years some engineers will make batteries the size of a pack of cigarettes that can go for 5+ hours that will be able to be recharged in minutes. And you'll be able to carry a couple of spares to swap out when they discharge. I have a feeling the Big Four Japanese companies have technology they are working on and waiting to unleash in a couple of years. Yamaha's trials bike is just a start. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, JoeRC51 said:

Unfortunately you wouldn't want to go any farther offroad than you'd be willing to push it back when the batteries ran down.    :lol:  Wait until you hear the price of a replacement battery , when the time comes.    :foul:   

Not sure it's any different that knowing how much fuel you have, your average mpg, and the distance of the loop you want to ride. You still have to push your gasser back if you exceed its fuel range. So, I see this as 6 of one, 1/2 a dozen of another. Yes, repl. batteries are 'spensive. But, we have to add up the off-seting costs of maintenance that an ebike lacks. So, the "actual" cost of the battery, not just the price. Obviously, cost of gas vs. cost of electric to charge, no air filters & filter maintenance products, no motor oil, no top-end rebuilds, etc... The delta is easily calculated, but it varies so much from bike to bike. If you ride an XR400R example, breathing air costs more. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:


×