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On 7/10/2018 at 7:24 PM, MarantzManiac said:

The super light Echo is simply put a game changer... much to the dismay of the Stihl faithful.... it's perfect for light to medium trail work.... and easily fits in the backpack   

Dismay of the Stihl faithful? Dismay? Echo? :facepalm::lol:  :lol:  :lol:

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Thankfully, here in the coastal South the downfalls are usually so rotten that you can just lift them off the trail. Rarely need a saw. If too big to move it's almost always easy to go around. Buy you folks who have lots of deep woods have much better scenery. I'd trade in a heartbeat and carry a chainsaw if necessary. Here I carry a Sportsman Pocket Saw.

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8 hours ago, motumatai said:

Wow, I envy you guys, being able to head out to clear trails with those sized saws.

Chainsaw1.jpg.01fceeccf9f0ca3227e312130b70123d.jpg

Here in NZ the trees are a wee bit bigger, requiring slightly bigger gear. They don't seem to make chainsaw carriers our size, so we have to improvise:

The 36" bar on the saw  manages most of the small to medium sized trees we encounter on trail, but  for the big stuff we have to use the 48" bar, which actually bungies onto the handlebars OK, you just can't forget that its there when riding in the tight stuff!

chainsaw4.thumb.jpg.bbfed2fc40d3d469e35121bafaa593a3.jpg

We ride in pairs normally, as you can see the chainsaw bar requires a power head at both ends to chew through the big stuff. Otherwise you spend too much time sawing and not enough time riding:ride:

 

 

We would get about 5ft (1.5 metres) with the bar strapped to the handlebars like that before hitting trees. 

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Yeah, OK:lame: you've seen through my attempt at humour. I've only once needed to carry the big saw in. As others have said its much easier to go around than through. On this occasion though the 4x4 needed to follow us with all the spare gas and camping gear, so we went ahead to cut through a couple of monsters across the trail. requires quite a bit of thought to ride with something that heavy onboard as you can imagine:)

Like most of you the most useful bit of trail clearing gear I carry is one of those little folding hand saws, and possibly a folding shovel for benching slopes that you can't afford to fall down.....

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On 7/11/2018 at 11:36 AM, wwguy said:

Front mount handles better, the saw is better protected, and the saw is easier and faster to deploy and stow between cuts.  

Agree on front mounting. I found rear mounting was very unbalanced in steep terrain with the gas and oil back there too.

On 7/10/2018 at 6:25 PM, MarantzManiac said:

sure and the Stihl 170 is nearly double the weight too.... apples and oranges.... think what it costs to knock 5 pounds off our bikes.... now put that weight on your back or forks and add gas, oil, wrench, water etc....

Simply put that''s why you pay more for the Echo.... bar size is insignificant as most folks go smaller anyway.... buy the Stihl if it's what you like.  

Stihl and Echo both make great saws. Having owned both, if you are going to cut at high altitude be sure to get a new electronic ignition system not CDI.

My Stihl MS201TCM with M-Tronic adapts to any altitude up to just below timberline around 11000 feet or so.

It is a little heavier but the extra power really comes in handy with large trees at altitude. It can be run wide open under load without overheating.

On 7/11/2018 at 10:00 AM, redhurricane said:

I like the convenience of the front mount like Bill Dart makes or even Trail tech, but like the headlight more. 

I run LED lights on the bars, see pix at link below. Hi/Lo beam would need some more work.

Info on my new 3rd generation rack is here with details and pix:

http://bit.ly/2yeTjBn

Not mounted on a Beta but I have owned an Xtrainer and am always a Beta fan! ;)

Edited by RedMesa
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On a related topic, I have decided it is way past time to start wearing chainsaw chaps. Too much disaster potential cutting solo in the backcountry. 

First ride I discovered a mod is needed if I am going to wear them while riding -- which I am going to do a lot. 

Pix and info here http://bit.ly/2OY0QPj

Edited by RedMesa

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2 hours ago, RedMesa said:

On a related topic, I have decided it is way past time to start wearing chainsaw chaps. Too much disaster potential cutting solo in the backcountry. 

First ride I discovered a mod is required if you are going to wear them while riding -- which I am going to do a lot. 

Pix and info here http://bit.ly/2OY0QPj

Chaps work by the fibers getting pulled out and into the saw, binding the chain up. Stitching them may not allow the fibers to pull out if the chaps do receive a cut.

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On the subject of saws, I carry a Stihl 192t climbing saw in a backpack if I anticipate needing a saw. The stock saw was horrendous for anything but small branches...ditched the crappy stock 1/4 pitch safety chain and 12" bar with the goofy pointy safety tip and replaced it with non-safety 3/8" picco chisel chain. Also upgraded to a 16" pro bar. To power it, I opened up the muffler and defeated the fuel screw limiters to get it more fuel. Runs pretty good now and can run the 16" buried in a log if you are patient. That being said, I couldn't imagine running a even smaller saw than the 192t. I'm sure the Echo is light and does fine on small stuff, but I'll sacrifice a couple pounds for a faster cutting saw.

I might have to go back to a fork mount. I recently picked up a Husky 550xp and it's too long to fit in a back pack. I actually bought it because I had a few big pines that I needed to climb and wanted a bigger saw than my climbing saw to chunk the logs down. It also fit into a hole in my saw line-up (had 30,70,90cc saws but not a 50cc.) Never intended on riding with it, but now it's tempting if I know I'm going to be doing a lot of cutting.

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2 hours ago, Sierra_rider said:

On the subject of saws, I carry a Stihl 192t climbing saw in a backpack if I anticipate needing a saw. The stock saw was horrendous for anything but small branches...ditched the crappy stock 1/4 pitch safety chain 

I might have to go back to a fork mount. I recently picked up a Husky 550xp and it's too long to fit in a back pack. I actually bought it because I had a few big pines that I needed to climb and wanted a bigger saw than my climbing saw to chunk the logs down. It also fit into a hole in my saw line-up (had 30,70,90cc saws but not a 50cc.) Never intended on riding with it, but now it's tempting if I know I'm going to be doing a lot of cutting.

The MS201TCM comes with green safety chain. I bought two spare chains, the more aggressive yellow: 63PM 50. Last longer but 30% higher risk of kickback. After a few hours on the safety chain I was so impressed by the total lack of wear and steady shower of huge chips that I took the yellow chains back to the dealer unopened and swapped for safety. 

The saw just howls wide open, trigger pinned, for 2-3 minutes in 30 inch green or seasoned logs at 9000 feet with never a hint of overheating or bogging. So I leaned a little to safety.

Tried the backpack thing in steep terrain and it did not work for me. My standard hydration pack is 20 lbs and adding another 12 lbs (in a larger pack) made my center of gravity too high. I actually went off the trail on a very steep descent. Learned a lot on those first few outings. ;)

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3 hours ago, Sierra_rider said:

Chaps work by the fibers getting pulled out and into the saw, binding the chain up. Stitching them may not allow the fibers to pull out if the chaps do receive a cut.

My bet is that a chain moving at 70 MPH is going to cut through my thread, leather, and ceramic blanket material rather quickly and pull out the Avertic fibers underneath.

It's a tradeoff between protecting the Avertic fibers from getting burned and possibly restricting their mobilization to jam the saw. I look on it as a personal balancing of two risks. 

Thanks for the feedback. It got me thinking and I came up with an alternative design that does not touch the Avertic fiber: see http://bit.ly/2OY0QPj

Edited by RedMesa

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1 hour ago, RedMesa said:

The MS201TCM comes with green safety chain. I bought two spare chains, the more aggressive yellow: 63PM 50. Last longer but 30% higher risk of kickback. After a few hours on the safety chain I was so impressed by the total lack of wear and steady shower of huge chips that I took the yellow chains back to the dealer unopened and swapped for safety. 

The saw just howls wide open, trigger pinned, for 2-3 minutes in 30 inch green or seasoned logs at 9000 feet with never a hint of overheating or bogging. So I leaned a little to safety.

Tried the backpack thing in steep terrain and it did not work for me. My standard hydration pack is 20 lbs and adding another 12 lbs (in a larger pack) made my center of gravity too high. I actually went off the trail on a very steep descent. Learned a lot on those first few outings. ;)

Safety chain has come a long way...the old stuff with the extra raker on the tie-straps sucked. It took up the void space between the cutters that is supposed to be used to carry the chips out during a cut. The new ones with the raker next to the depth gauge are a lot better and not appreciably slower in the cut. However, in my experience in the wildland fire world, they tend to throw chains easy if brushing. Mainly for that reason, I run the yellow chain...also they seem to be easier to bore into wood with the tip. Not a technique I recommend for the average saw user, but a technique I like to use in certain situations.

As far as the saws with the electronic carbs(M-tronic, Autotune,) the 550xp I just picked up is my first e-carb. So far the impressions have been good, I think they are pretty good for most users. I know we've had issues with them before at work, but that is under pretty extreme situations that the saws were probably never designed for.

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