KeithDRZ400

Suspension setup

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I’m sure this has been covered 1000+ times but I’m planning on getting my suspension setup for my weight and riding style. I am currently looking at race tech springs, valves, etc. and am wondering what you guys are using. I read good reviews about their stuff but want to hear some of your opinions. I’m not all that knowledgeable when it comes to suspension and on previous bikes (RM250 and CRF450) I have just had a local suspension shop handle everything, but that’s expensive and I want to give it a try myself to learn something. This bike seems like it’s sprung for a 9 year old and will bottom out easily if I ride at even a moderate pace through the trails. I have the preload set as good as it can get and I’m already out of compression adjustment on the rear so it’s time to modify. Are the online calculators on Racetech’s website fairly reliable? I admit I’ve put on quite a few pounds over the years but this thing is sprung way too light!

 

What are you guys using?

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The 1st step is to put fresh fluids in and see how you like it. Dirt bike suspension is a maintenance item and probably the most often neglected. What year and sub model of DRZ? The 2000-2002 S models have a old style dampening rod fork that really benefits from Racetech Emulators.

Bermudacat has a good bit of knowledge about building better shims stacks for these bikes. He'll be around I'm sure. I. The mean time, what's your height , weight and riding terrain?

 

 

 

 

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Its a 2017 s model. Only 1400 miles on it and about 2 months old. I’m 6’ 260lbs (my fat butt needs a diet). I ride a mix of rock, dirt and mud as well as pavement. I’m a fairly aggressive rider for the most part. I do a bit of single track as well. Basically every terrain there is except sand lol. I would like it setup more like an rmz basically.

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Had to buy 2 rear springs for my drz at 195lbls, go with the bigger springs  if your close. 5.7 was recommended but not enough

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I’m sure this has been covered 1000+ times but I’m planning on getting my suspension setup for my weight and riding style. I am currently looking at race tech springs, valves, etc. and am wondering what you guys are using. I read good reviews about their stuff but want to hear some of your opinions. I’m not all that knowledgeable when it comes to suspension and on previous bikes (RM250 and CRF450) I have just had a local suspension shop handle everything, but that’s expensive and I want to give it a try myself to learn something. This bike seems like it’s sprung for a 9 year old and will bottom out easily if I ride at even a moderate pace through the trails. I have the preload set as good as it can get and I’m already out of compression adjustment on the rear so it’s time to modify. Are the online calculators on Racetech’s website fairly reliable? I admit I’ve put on quite a few pounds over the years but this thing is sprung way too light!

 

What are you guys using?

 

Using RaceTech springs & gold valves. Worth every penny.

 

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The front forks are pretty good, just need springs and tuning for your weight and riding terrain.  I sent mine to Eddie who changed springs and played with the shim stack.  Night and day difference.  Not sure the gold valves are needed (certainly can't hurt) with the newer forks if you know somebody that can tune it properly. 

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The front forks are pretty good, just need springs and tuning for your weight and riding terrain.  I sent mine to Eddie who changed springs and played with the shim stack.  Night and day difference.  Not sure the gold valves are needed (certainly can't hurt) with the newer forks if you know somebody that can tune it properly. 


I will agree that the rear is definitely worse but I bottom the front out pretty frequently. 1 good rock hit or small jump and it’s at the bottom.

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Are you figuring that for trail riding, enduro, motocross, etc.? I don’t want to do it twice lol.
Hardcore trail
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With the golgvalves, you get a valve shim chart. These guys know the "science of suspension", spot on. Can't tell you how much I like the DRZ-S now, can pound woops now in 4th-5th gear !...

...And feel safe doing it! Lol

 

 

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2 hours ago, Diverdown said:

Get the .54 fork springs. And at least a 6. shock spring.

 

I'm pretty sure this is my set-up. Larger tank, a bit of luggage and 200 lbs

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Lucky for us, the DRZ has really good quality forks and rear shocks. Unlucky for us, they are way under-damped on compression. It is easy to throw stiffer springs at them to mask the lack of compression damping, but you will only create problems doing this. You may get the bike to not bottom in the big stuff, to only have it too harsh for slow trails.

The DRZS is shimmed for logging roads and street, so if your heading to tight singletrack, you're in trouble.

Suspension technology deals with a lot of complex physics and there is more than one way to solve the same problem, which means no one suspension tuner or suspension philosophy will necessarily be the gospel or give you the results your looking for. Most anything will initially feel better than what you have, however, as your skills increase due to better suspension, you will also be able to more easily find other characteristics you'd like to improve.

One common myth is that a faster rider needs stiffer springs and another is that once the bike is properly set up for a rider it will never need any additional modification. Personal preference is HUGE, so two riders of the same weight on the same bike on the same terrain are going to have different setups, period. Suspension tuning isn't a box store solution, however, the box stores can sell you something you don't have at this moment, and that is a linear damping coefficient.

It doesn't sound to me like you want to hand over a stack of cash and your suspension to a third party. Regardless of your path, I'd read up on how suspensions work right here; http://www.shimrestackor.com/index.htm

Great DIY guide right here;

I am running the stock rear shock at the LEAST preload (10.17") with one more click on rebound and one less click on compression.

In my forks I'm running .46 springs with Kyle Tarry's  triple shim stack with an extra 24x01 shim on the first and second stage. I need to take out those two extra shims so I can choke down on my clickers and possibly go to .45 springs. (I will pull out one of the .46 and put in one of the stock .44's). Fork shims are not that difficult for DIY.

Besides tearing my shock apart and adding some low speed compression shims and the RS valve with a 5.3kg spring rather than the stock 5.5kg.

I weigh 180lbs without gear and spend a lot of time in 1st gear with my finger on the clutch.

 

 

IMG_20160604_145225.jpg

Edited by Bermudacat

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