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Does someone have some experience with powder coating. Is there any difference in quality between one company and another. Also I assume it won’t ruin any heat treat in a aluminum rim? 

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Took may chain guide stuff and BRP reinforcement brackets to my local powder coating place and they had some wheels they did as well as pictures of everything else they had done. They have done a lot of wheels. Turned out sweet. No harm, no foul. Be forewarned, the surface must be pristine or whatever flaw will show through. Black maybe not. But the candy colors and the ones that resemble metallic on cars, will show everything. Man, the wheels they had there looked sweet. Too good to use!

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The powder coating doesn’t get hot enough to hurt the aluminum, but it will melt plastic and make grease run and drip. If you’re doing the wheel in the pic, make sure you remove the bearings and clean out any grease that might be left behind.
The biggest factors for a successful job are surface prep and curing at the proper temp. Make sure the shop you use is experienced.

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Quality does vary.

You're fine. People get rims done all the time. They look awesome once done.

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356-T6 is a very common alloy used for wheels. The T6 schedule calls for an aging temp around 310F. Bake it in an oven at 400F and it will anneal. How much strength is lost depends on the process, but it's a good reason why lots of shops won't touch structural aluminum, and why low temp powders exist.

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5 hours ago, Studhaeuser said:

356-T6 is a very common alloy used for wheels. The T6 schedule calls for an aging temp around 310F. Bake it in an oven at 400F and it will anneal. How much strength is lost depends on the process, but it's a good reason why lots of shops won't touch structural aluminum, and why low temp powders exist.

So the low temp powder coat is the answer?

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Also, some powdercoats are more UV resistant than others. UV can cause not only changes in color, but cracking as well. Just make sure they use something that has good UV resistance. Piwdercoating is just plastic dust that gets melted together in an oven.

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