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Suspension settings for food delivery.

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I deliver food with my drz400sm(GrubHub, etc...), anyone have some advice for how to set the suspension to jostle the food the least, mainly I assume the rear.  The food sits out pretty far over the rear fender.  I don't really care about performance when I'm delivering.  Would rising while braking helpful or harmful?  I really can't tell... the food rarely looks messed up, despite questionable driving choices.  Oh yeah, it still needs to be able to go through a construction site now and then...  Any help appreciated. Will include pic.

P_20180710_182154_vHDR_On.jpg

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I bet mounting a camera where the food sits might give me an idea of what's going on.  Or mount a camera above some food and drive it.  Although it might be hard to remember what was happening on the road.

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You need to set the sag like an normal dirt bike to around 90mm. In your case this includes you in full riding gear with foie gras, fava beans and chianti strapped to the rear fender

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drop your tire pressure to 20-25psi, soften the high/low speed compression, and go easy on your braking/acceleration. 

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I work for GrubHub, Uber eats, door dash, Postmates, favor, caviar, eat24, lash and a few others, maybe order a pizza?  I don't work for any pizza places ;)

I image, for the most part, my food comes out better than a car making the same trip at the same speed (I don't slow down for potholes).  But I'm probably more aggressive than most drivers.  I haven't had any customer complaints yet on this bike, but I've only been working with it about a month.  If I could choose the vehicle when I order, I'd choose something like what I drive... With a different driver than me ;)

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6 hours ago, ohgood said:

drop your tire pressure to 20-25psi, soften the high/low speed compression, and go easy on your braking/acceleration. 

Sport tire pressure should be set so that the cold pressure is about four pounds less than the hot pressure. If it is more, you need to add air.

 

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That’s awesome, reminds me of being stationed in Bahrain those dudes ripped food around that island at warp speed, traffic laws and pedestrians be damned

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Mate if that's how you lock your bike, be careful.  Big wrench, back wheel out, slip out of chain, back wheel back on. bye bye.  At the very least go through the rim and swingarm. Frame is always best, if you have room.

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 Looks like the tailpipe keeps the food warm! I would think stiffening the rebound on the rear might help

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Put the food in a backpack and use your legs to soften the ride . Not much to gain as far as jolts on the bike , suspension only goes so far without sagging to the point of hitting the rear tire on the fender . Best would be 1970's balloon tires on 8" rims and 4-5 psi , think ATC70 .

 

 

.

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Posted (edited)
18 hours ago, markaz32 said:

Mate if that's how you lock your bike, be careful.  Big wrench, back wheel out, slip out of chain, back wheel back on. bye bye.  At the very least go through the rim and swingarm. Frame is always best, if you have room.

That's how I lock it when I'm working, just waiting in the living room a few feet away, the lock has an alarm.  But, it's also wrapped around the linkage in the lower suspension so you can't just take off a wheel, you have to disassemble the rear suspension, but easiest way would be cut that cheap chain.  I have a hardened steel 14mm heavy equipment chain, and a better kryptonite lock.  Then that little chain and alarm lock go on the cover, to sound an alarm first.  I've had a few bikes stolen, and it is still possible to steal it. But it's going to take you a minute.

Edited by Kirk K

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On ‎7‎/‎12‎/‎2018 at 4:24 PM, Bermudacat said:

Sport tire pressure should be set so that the cold pressure is about four pounds less than the hot pressure. If it is more, you need to add air.

 

10% rule , if the pressure goes up more than 10% , you're too soft , less than 10% , you're too hard.  I'd run about 22 psi at a DRZ's weight , front and rear.  Manufacturers recommendations are ALWAYS too high.  

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21 hours ago, JoeRC51 said:

10% rule , if the pressure goes up more than 10% , you're too soft , less than 10% , you're too hard.  I'd run about 22 psi at a DRZ's weight , front and rear.  Manufacturers recommendations are ALWAYS too high.  

Interesting, I like it.

Smaller bike, smaller percent change means less total pressure. :thumbsup:

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Posted (edited)
5 minutes ago, Bermudacat said:

Interesting, I like it.

Smaller bike, smaller percent change means less total pressure. :thumbsup:

Same percentage , any bike or tire.

Edited by JoeRC51

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14 minutes ago, JoeRC51 said:

Same percentage , any bike or tire.

Right, 10% would likely be less than 4psi.

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