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Hi all, 

Back after a hiatus from supermotos after I sold my KTM 625SMC. Now I've got a 701SM (2016) and ... of course, fuel injection, no more carbs! :jawdrop:

 

Couple of questions I hope someone can help with - the bike already had a few mods: 

Akrapovic slip on, with EVO Airbox mod. 

power commander V 

ABS dongle mod

Those are all that's really relevant for this post. 

Essentially the previous owner told me that 0 was the bad quality fuel map, 1 was sport map and 2 onwards were standard maps. Doing a little digging, it turned out this wasn't quite correct. 

1 is the soft map, 2 is the sport map and 3 onwards are standard as far as I've found. 0 is of course the bad fuel map only for dire situations on low octane. 

My question is, will the PCV change these maps at all? 

I don't know where to control the PCV maps 'on the fly' - seems this requires a separate module? 

Other than this I think I have it right that the PCV control injection, whereas the underseat switch controls ignition timing. This would make sense given that on low octane, preventing detonation is usually Achieved by regarding ignition. 

 

Can anyone correct me or give any of their findings? 

 

Thanks 

Wilbert

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First you have to understand the 690/701 has 2 maps - one for the FI (fuel Injection) and one for the ride-by-wire throttle called the EP map. The "soft" and "sport" switch setting only change the throttle response EP map. The "bad fuel" setting does change the ignition curve... The switch does not change the FI map at all.

I have no experience with the Power Pomander on a 690. I know the principals of how it work but way too much to type...  Should be able to google it. 

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4 minutes ago, DrKayak said:

First you have to understand the 690/701 has 2 maps - one for the FI (fuel Injection) and one for the ride-by-wire throttle called the EP map. The "soft" and "sport" switch setting only change the throttle response EP map. The "bad fuel" setting does change the ignition curve... The switch does not change the FI map at all.

I have no experience with the Power Pomander on a 690. I know the principals of how it work but way too much to type...  Should be able to google it. 

That's slightly confusing, you say there are two maps, one of which is for fuel injection, but then state that the switch doesn't change the FI at all? 

 

I'm asking whether the switch under the seat operates completely independently of the power commander - and is one really that much softer that two? Some have said that it reduces the overall power too, as though it's a rain map. 

I'm asking on the forum at this stage as I've spend over an hour searching at this point already. Dynojet website doesn't say much. 

Thanks 

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8 hours ago, WilbertSM4L said:

That's slightly confusing, you say there are two maps, one of which is for fuel injection, but then state that the switch doesn't change the FI at all? 

 

I'm asking whether the switch under the seat operates completely independently of the power commander - and is one really that much softer that two? Some have said that it reduces the overall power too, as though it's a rain map

I'm asking on the forum at this stage as I've spend over an hour searching at this point already. Dynojet website doesn't say much. 

Thanks 

I have a built 2016, here's how the system works...

There is a round module near the fuse box which has a rubber cap on it. Remove that cap and you'll see a dial with an arrow on it. That arrow will point to one of about 10 different numbers. My understanding is that this manages the ignition and ride-by-wire maps (although ride-by-wire only makes sense as well). Set it to the advanced/sport setting and leave it alone - I've ridden my bike like this in the rain, snow, dirt, and asphalt without issue. Just make sure to have a steady throttle hand!

The PCV, depending on where you bought it from, may come preloaded with a custom map for your bike or one of the DynoJet base maps. This will put you in a decent AFR range, but will generally still be off until you're able to take the bike to a tuner who can adjust everything on the dyno. With the PCV, you're able to modify the fuel and ignition maps, and it will make a huge difference in how the bike performs especially at low throttle openings. My bike became infinitely smoother once I got it dyno tuned. 

The map switch for the PCV does come as a separate purchase (about $50), it'll allow you to switch between two PCV fuel/ignition maps on the fly. My bike is currently loaded with a street 92 pump map, and a track u4.4 map.

 

Hope that helps!

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I'm open to correction on this issue and i've only had my 2016 SMC R  for about 2 weeks but have had lots of experience fuel mapping previous fuel injected bikes R1, Daytona 675.
I did lots of reading prior to getting my bike and its my understanding that under a set rpm or throttle positions the EFI runs in closed loop mode, hence the O2 sensor in the header pipe.
While it's in this mode no matter what a piggyback controller like the PCV5 is trying to fool the ECU into delivering the bike will always try and maintain a 14.7:1 fuel mixture and override any effect the PCV is trying to achieve.

When the RPM or throttle position gets beyond this point the ECU will switch to open loop mode and inject whatever fuel qty, A/F ratio is set in its map (moderated by air, coolant temp and barometric pressure readings)
this is when a PCV5 will be able to fool the ECU into injecting more or less fuel than the stock map dictates.

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8 hours ago, rusky said:

I have a built 2016, here's how the system works...

There is a round module near the fuse box which has a rubber cap on it. Remove that cap and you'll see a dial with an arrow on it. That arrow will point to one of about 10 different numbers. My understanding is that this manages the ignition and ride-by-wire maps (although ride-by-wire only makes sense as well). Set it to the advanced/sport setting and leave it alone - I've ridden my bike like this in the rain, snow, dirt, and asphalt without issue. Just make sure to have a steady throttle hand!

The PCV, depending on where you bought it from, may come preloaded with a custom map for your bike or one of the DynoJet base maps. This will put you in a decent AFR range, but will generally still be off until you're able to take the bike to a tuner who can adjust everything on the dyno. With the PCV, you're able to modify the fuel and ignition maps, and it will make a huge difference in how the bike performs especially at low throttle openings. My bike became infinitely smoother once I got it dyno tuned. 

The map switch for the PCV does come as a separate purchase (about $50), it'll allow you to switch between two PCV fuel/ignition maps on the fly. My bike is currently loaded with a street 92 pump map, and a track u4.4 map.

 

Hope that helps!

Thanks! Was the difference between 1 (soft) and 2 (sport) massively noticeable? 

I think the PCV has the slip on and Evo Airbox map loaded. I could check this, but to be honest am more likely to take it to be dyno ran and set up independently so it's spot on. 

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4 hours ago, FredC said:

I'm open to correction on this issue and i've only had my 2016 SMC R  for about 2 weeks but have had lots of experience fuel mapping previous fuel injected bikes R1, Daytona 675.
I did lots of reading prior to getting my bike and its my understanding that under a set rpm or throttle positions the EFI runs in closed loop mode, hence the O2 sensor in the header pipe.
While it's in this mode no matter what a piggyback controller like the PCV5 is trying to fool the ECU into delivering the bike will always try and maintain a 14.7:1 fuel mixture and override any effect the PCV is trying to achieve.

When the RPM or throttle position gets beyond this point the ECU will switch to open loop mode and inject whatever fuel qty, A/F ratio is set in its map (moderated by air, coolant temp and barometric pressure readings)
this is when a PCV5 will be able to fool the ECU into injecting more or less fuel than the stock map dictates.

I can't see any evidence of an 02 sensor connected anywhere, especially on the header and I'm sure it's a stock header pipe. Where should I be looking? 

 

Thanks 

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  • 5 weeks later...



I have a built 2016, here's how the system works...
There is a round module near the fuse box which has a rubber cap on it. Remove that cap and you'll see a dial with an arrow on it. That arrow will point to one of about 10 different numbers. My understanding is that this manages the ignition and ride-by-wire maps (although ride-by-wire only makes sense as well). Set it to the advanced/sport setting and leave it alone - I've ridden my bike like this in the rain, snow, dirt, and asphalt without issue. Just make sure to have a steady throttle hand!

The PCV, depending on where you bought it from, may come preloaded with a custom map for your bike or one of the DynoJet base maps. This will put you in a decent AFR range, but will generally still be off until you're able to take the bike to a tuner who can adjust everything on the dyno. With the PCV, you're able to modify the fuel and ignition maps, and it will make a huge difference in how the bike performs especially at low throttle openings. My bike became infinitely smoother once I got it dyno tuned. 
The map switch for the PCV does come as a separate purchase (about $50), it'll allow you to switch between two PCV fuel/ignition maps on the fly. My bike is currently loaded with a street 92 pump map, and a track u4.4 map.
 
Hope that helps!


Where is dial switch/ round module? 20180817_205419.jpeg Not seeing it.
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11 hours ago, HankChinaski said:
12 hours ago, Flagstaff said:
On the 690 it would be to right of the battery, up top in your photo. It's shown and explained in the owners manual under "Tuning the engine" :excuseme:
Perhaps the newer engine doesn't have one?
 

Nope, not in the manual, not on the 2017 701.

I would think it would be easy to see and get to.

Perhaps you lose? :D

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Can we please get some knowledgable people on these dial settings? do they add fuel? Is a PCV needed?
Dial settings only available up to MY2016. Changes affect ignition mapping and ride by wire response. There is no change in fuel mapping at all.

A PCV is not needed if you're staying stock, but is an absolute must even if you're swapping the exhaust. The bike runs very lean on bottom and mid range in stock form. As a result, you'll get surging throttle, hotter motor, and eventually faster wear. Ideally you want to keep A/F somewhere around 12.5-13.1.
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On 8/23/2018 at 9:26 PM, rusky said:

Dial settings only available up to MY2016. Changes affect ignition mapping and ride by wire response. There is no change in fuel mapping at all.

A PCV is not needed if you're staying stock, but is an absolute must even if you're swapping the exhaust. The bike runs very lean on bottom and mid range in stock form. As a result, you'll get surging throttle, hotter motor, and eventually faster wear. Ideally you want to keep A/F somewhere around 12.5-13.1.

I’m still in the break in on my 2018 701SM. I just installed the Akropovic slip on, it’s the factory pipe from the dealer. My ‘back of the pants dyno’ tells me it’s a little more responsive, it sounds way better too. I thinking now though that I might go the PCV route. In order to maximize the effect I think I’ll have to do something with the air Box? Rottweiler perhaps? What are your thoughts. 

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I’m still in the break in on my 2018 701SM. I just installed the Akropovic slip on, it’s the factory pipe from the dealer. My ‘back of the pants dyno’ tells me it’s a little more responsive, it sounds way better too. I thinking now though that I might go the PCV route. In order to maximize the effect I think I’ll have to do something with the air Box? Rottweiler perhaps? What are your thoughts. 
I wouldn't put anything other than a Rottweiler intake on this bike. Make sure to do a dyno tune after the base rottweiler map is loaded.
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2 hours ago, rusky said:

I wouldn't put anything other than a Rottweiler intake on this bike. Make sure to do a dyno tune after the base rottweiler map is loaded.

I was hoping to avoid a session on the dyno. I know deep down it’s the ultimate. How good are the Rottweiler base maps for the PCV? Can I get away with only an hour on the dyno? 

How much of a difference did you feel with your setup, PCV pipe, intake and dyno tune?

cheers.

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I was hoping to avoid a session on the dyno. I know deep down it’s the ultimate. How good are the Rottweiler base maps for the PCV? Can I get away with only an hour on the dyno? 
How much of a difference did you feel with your setup, PCV pipe, intake and dyno tune?
cheers.
You can get away with the base map but a dyno tune will make the bike much smoother and produce more power. After everything was said and done, I was making 55lbs of torque and 70whp. Gonna be 80whp pretty soon with the new cam I got.

Timewise, I'm not sure. My tuner doesn't charge by the hour.
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4 minutes ago, rusky said:

You can get away with the base map but a dyno tune will make the bike much smoother and produce more power. After everything was said and done, I was making 55lbs of torque and 70whp. Gonna be 80whp pretty soon with the new cam I got.

Timewise, I'm not sure. My tuner doesn't charge by the hour.

Wow, that’s significant. I think that’s the route I’ll go. Might as well eh! I have a top notch tuner a few hours away. I am sure he can get it done in an hour if the base map is fairly accurate. 

Gotta finish the break in on this beast! Ugh such a pain. First world problems. 

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