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COMMANDER RENFROW

SCARED of crashing and jumping

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Hello Ive been riding for five years and I have a problem. I am still scared of crashing and doing jumps. I want this to be fixed. Im about to get an upgrade and this is big for me. but with this Im going to be doing more jumps going faster ect. Is there a way to help get over this I will exept help from any one. Thankyou for your time.

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Do you do any of the jumps at the moment, or is it that you do them but feel very inhibited?  I think it is normal to have some fear.  I think the top riders even have some fear but are very good at putting it aside and working through it after a bad crash.  They are able to ride fast despite the fear.....channel it if you will.   If the fear makes it nearly impossible to ride then that’s a problem and can actually be a safety issue. 

 

Big jumps are bloody scary, that’s a fact.   There would be something wrong and maybe cause for concern if there was no fear at all....lol.   I think it is part of what makes it feel so satisfying when you conquer a jump you thought you could never do or were previously afraid of.

 

If you get the opportunity ride with a more seasoned rider that you can follow over the jumps to match his/her speed.  But before going big, log hundreds even thousands of smaller jumps until jumping and controlling the bike in the air becomes comfortable and your reactions become second nature.  I think it’s like a lot of other things you have to develop it and through enough successful jumps plant the seed in your mind that you can do it.....through positive reinforcement each time you complete a jump successfully.

 

I’m far from a pro so take my advice with a grain of salt, but it’s how I see it and how my riding experiences have been. 

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Take smalls steps. We are all afraid to crash but crashing it just part of riding. You have to make jumps your feeling good with, and step it up. You can't get on the bike and expect to ride an MX track like the pros without putting a lot of effort into your riding skills. You want to vanquish you fear? You need more airtime. And then you will realise that it's actualy pretty easy to jump a bike. And fun as hell. 

I've just changed to a bigger bike too and at first I wasnt to happy with my performance. I was having arm pump after short rides and trouble handling the bigger bike. I spent hours on the forum here reading tips and watching videos of riding technique. It helped built my confidence up and better my technique. I suggest you try and do that to. Learn as much as you can then go out and practice! 

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Practice on a small single jump, or tabletop. Focus on technique and try to flow as much as possible. I used to fear jumps badly, and was stiff while jumping. I put a lot of pressure on myself to do jumps on mx tracks during races which gave me a nervous feeling. Just accept that you may not be ready to hit big jumps that seem easy for other riders. If you focus on jumping safer things with good form, you will be able to try bigger jumps when you feel ready. Keep it fun, relax and your fear’s will subside.

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Best thing to do is follow someone thats doing the jump. You'll be suprised how easy they are

Screenshot_20180901-230710.png

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Try drinking a few beers and a shot or two of whiskey. Throw in a bit of weed. You'll be fine.

All kidding aside, if you're that scared of hitting the deck you should drop the sport. 

Edited by gatorfan

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On 9/3/2018 at 10:46 AM, Motox367 said:

Best thing to do is follow someone thats doing the jump. You'll be suprised how easy they are

Screenshot_20180901-230710.png

I hear this all the time at the track and strongly disagree. 1) Bikes don't weigh the same 2) Suspension set-ups and rider technique will alter distances 3) small differences on the throttle at launch can translate into large differences in the air 4) Body position is a huge variable in air travel.

Just because you are side by side with another rider who is going to show you the speed needed to clear a double doesn't mean you will.

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I'm scared of jumps also! I thinks it's because every time I try to jump I almost crash and scare myself. I only ride at the desert and so I try to jump over small washes but sometimes it's a last second decision and I don't know what I'm landing on and I under jump and lane on big rocks or just almost loop out.

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On 7/27/2018 at 2:20 PM, COMMANDER RENFROW said:

Hello Ive been riding for five years and I have a problem. I am still scared of crashing and doing jumps. I want this to be fixed. Im about to get an upgrade and this is big for me. but with this Im going to be doing more jumps going faster ect. Is there a way to help get over this I will exept help from any one. Thankyou for your time.

Im making the assumption that you havent started jumping anything yet but want to,  whether thats correct or not I dont know.

But just a few pointers to ponder.

Start learning at your own pace and start small.

Try to get comfortable on the bike and know what it can and cant do.

Dont try to jump something that you either dont have the power for, or the suspension for.

Expect to make some mistakes because theyre going to happen, but try to stay calm.

One of the key points about progressing is learning to not just hold on, but to be able to control the bike.

Controlling the bike means where you position yourself such as more toward the rear or more toward the front.

Controlling the bike means throttle control which along with body position is really important.

Dont start off learning on too steep of a take off.

Those are just a few tips to help you get started.

 

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Almost all of the jumps at my local MX tracks are step jumps where there is a gap (cavity) you must clear or you’re in for a serious problem.

(Why the track owners cannot make some table top jumps so people can progress is a mystery to me. If you’re too big to ride the pee wee track you basically have to learn to do step jumps from the get go, so I comprehend your anxiety.)

Try searching for how to jump videos on YouTube. I found some fairly professionally made ones that seem pretty helpful. Both the “how to” and “things to avoid” type. Before you invest time in watching any, scroll down to the comments section and make sure there are not a bunch of “this is really bad advice” remarks from what appear to be seasoned riders—there tends to be when the vids are not good.

Enduro Cross Training is a good place to start and YouTube will serve up suggestions from there.

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During normal spirited riding, you will be doing jumps. You will not notice it. When I first started in MX, I was terrified of the idea of big air. I tried to keep the bike low. I'd watch guys practicing going way up there. Not me! I had friends who did not race but came to hang out. They told me I was going higher and longer than the guys I was commenting about! See, on the track, you are looking where you are going, not down where you are. So because the jumps were so smooth, I had no idea I was 'doing it'. Since then, I ignore jumps and all that. I am careful on trials with dips that can induce a jump as some could shoot you straight up if taken wrong.

Ride at your own pace, what makes you comfortable. Master your skills. Do not try and progress far beyond your ability. Work more on being a great rider than one of the goons that 'Man, I barely saved it' ones. Those goons more often loose it and are the ones with pointless injuries.

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I too suffer from this fear. The f#@k that I gotta work Monday syndrome. I still hit jumps but not anything big. Start small and stay loose on the bike but still in control. If your all tense and stiff, you'll transfer that to the bike and not have control. Find something small that you can roll over to get a feel and then gradually pickup your speed until you feel the bike starts lift off the jump. Get afeel for that and then pickup your speed until youre in the air. Remember stay loose and look ahead to where your going. Keep hitting this jump until you're comfortable hitting it as many different ways as you can. Then go to a step up and table top. Once you got all that then hit the double and triple jumps...well not me cause f#@k that I gotta work Monday.:busted:

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I hear this all the time at the track and strongly disagree. 1) Bikes don't weigh the same 2) Suspension set-ups and rider technique will alter distances 3) small differences on the throttle at launch can translate into large differences in the air 4) Body position is a huge variable in air travel.
Just because you are side by side with another rider who is going to show you the speed needed to clear a double doesn't mean you will.


Dude. He didn’t say to jump side by side next to someone. Just follow about 20 feet back or so and you will get a feel for the run up speed needed. It’s more of a way to feel like someone is guiding you in making the jump as a comfort thing for you. If you are going to over analyze/over complicate it like what you are doing, your probably in no position to mess with this idea. Stick to practicing turns if you are going to be thinking that much while coming up to a big jump you’ve never done. It’s all about feel, it can’t really be explained. You need to be relaxed and going with the flow when following a better rider over a jump.
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1 hour ago, JGlaze said:

 


Dude. He didn’t say to jump side by side next to someone. Just follow about 20 feet back or so and you will get a feel for the run up speed needed. It’s more of a way to feel like someone is guiding you in making the jump as a comfort thing for you. If you are going to over analyze/over complicate it like what you are doing, your probably in no position to mess with this idea. Stick to practicing turns if you are going to be thinking that much while coming up to a big jump you’ve never done. It’s all about feel, it can’t really be explained. You need to be relaxed and going with the flow when following a better rider over a jump.

 

Exactly 👍👍 

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On 7/27/2018 at 5:20 PM, COMMANDER RENFROW said:

Hello Ive been riding for five years and I have a problem. I am still scared of crashing and doing jumps. I want this to be fixed. Im about to get an upgrade and this is big for me. but with this Im going to be doing more jumps going faster ect. Is there a way to help get over this I will exept help from any one. Thankyou for your time.

Check out one of my recent tutorials on jumping! I actually just made one regarding the most common jumping mistake I see from beginner and novice/VET riders. Riding in a defensive position will give the bike an unpredictable launch through the air, and give YOU the least amount of control over the bike. I also covered what position you SHOULD be in.. I hope it helps!

Here's the link! - The most common jumping mistake and HOW to fix it

- Randall Everett, Ivyhill MX

 

Edited by Ivyhill MX
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Quantify the number of times you launch and find yourself in a pitch you did not expect. If this is still common you are not ready to get real air. Keep practicing until you can tell before you launch that there will be no surprises. When surprises are rare, go for more air.

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I say repetition is the key. I'm still scared of a crash but I go do my thing because the love of riding overshadows any fear I have but I'm no idiot when I ride either. When I encounter something new at a track I usually watch several riders complete the obstacle then go roll it a few times then follow a rider that is making it look very smooth without any kind of whip. This is strictly for speed matching. 

You just have to go do it several times until you are confident in your abilities. 

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I’m not the greatest jumper, but once you understand the fact your bike is comprised of many pivot points, leverage points and gyros you can begin utilizing this knowledge for increased control. There’s way too much important detail to explain in a quick post. There’s a point when you’re riding loosely and correctly where it comes together intuitively. Your body will find it’s correctly positioned place over the bike to make subtle corrections, along with peg weighting, handlebar manipulation (gyroscopic precession) and such. When that starts “clicking” over smaller jumps/obstacles you’ll have the type of control/confidence to go bigger. Gary Semics videos offer excellent advice on all this, as well as practice drills.

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get a lighter bike or start on a mtb and doing jumps.  Same concept but lighter weight

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