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Hi, I have just bought a kx250f, 2013 with a freshly rebuilt 2016 motor in it, this is my first time on these forums, anyways, I have also bought a lowering link to drop it 4 inches on the arse, I was wondering if anyone knows how much I should drop the forks? 

I havent put the lowering link on yet. 

Thanks.  

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Well you could look up a rake angle and measure. Test. Readjust.
Or just do it inch by inch and see what's comfortable to you.
It'll steer differently and you'll notice.
We don't know cause we don't know your weight and sag settings when I think that plays in.
Raise forks inch by inch and test. It'll take an hour.

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Well you could look up a rake angle and measure. Test. Readjust.
Or just do it inch by inch and see what's comfortable to you.
It'll steer differently and you'll notice.
We don't know cause we don't know your weight and sag settings when I think that plays in.
Raise forks inch by inch and test. It'll take an hour.


Thanks for the reply, I guess there is no better way than just trial and error.

I am not sure of how they set up the shock, I only just bought the bike so previous owner could have done anything with it for his weight and purpose, I dont know if he raced it or used it for trail riding or was just riding it around his property.

He traded it to the bike shop and didnt tell them anything bout it.

I dont know much about how to do sag settings but I bet I can find a lot of youtube vids on it (I hope) I am around 96kgs, after lowering it, would I need to adjust the preload? Or is it just one of those things where, like with the forks, if it feels right then leave it, and if it doesnt just keep adjusting and trying it out?

I will give it a shot anyway and see how I go, thanks again!

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Read about setting static sag and race sag.
EVerything with suspension creates a different bike. And it is to be created for you.
I might be negative saying this, but it was designed/made by a 40 kg dude! And 96kg...thats over 200lbs?
I'm just not familiar with conversion. Please don't take offense.
But dude, even just changing the fork oil viscosity makes a change. Then spring rate. Then valving.
At least you have on board external clickers.
But that's not for everything.
If the shock was just rebuilt. Im sure it's to stock specs if a 200lb dude that rides woods didn't say make this shock for me.
Sag is basically all preload. If you can't get to where you need to be, spring rate needs to be looked into.
Don't let me overtalk it like you can't do without it.
But trust me. It becomes YOUR bike once suspension is dialed in.
A largely overlooked thing to do.
Ya I bet there's some good you tube sag videos. You tube is awesome. My sister even works on her own civic! And she's an oceanographer!

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Read about setting static sag and race sag.
EVerything with suspension creates a different bike. And it is to be created for you.
I might be negative saying this, but it was designed/made by a 40 kg dude! And 96kg...thats over 200lbs?
I'm just not familiar with conversion. Please don't take offense.
But dude, even just changing the fork oil viscosity makes a change. Then spring rate. Then valving.
At least you have on board external clickers.
But that's not for everything.
If the shock was just rebuilt. Im sure it's to stock specs if a 200lb dude that rides woods didn't say make this shock for me.
Sag is basically all preload. If you can't get to where you need to be, spring rate needs to be looked into.
Don't let me overtalk it like you can't do without it.
But trust me. It becomes YOUR bike once suspension is dialed in.
A largely overlooked thing to do.
Ya I bet there's some good you tube sag videos. You tube is awesome. My sister even works on her own civic! And she's an oceanographer!


That’d be awesome to have a sister who knows even how to change her own oil.. or even just where the dipstick is at least to check it, let alone do her own repairs etc!

I wouldnt worry too much about weight ratings, I mean yeah, obviously you’d wear a shock and forks out a lot faster, its common sense, and it’d matter even more if youre racing or jumping it, I’m just trail riding through my 300acre property, tbh I have been riding a little honda crf100 for the past year and a half and it takes the weight without issue. (I can imagine a lot of peoples reactions after reading that haha)

Standard in the specs the kx250f can take 75-85kg, not sure if australian bikes are made for heavier weights as most aussies are tall and naturally heavier I guess? (I happen to be short (172cm) but heavy on muscle haha)

Thanks for the info man, I appreciate it a lot.

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On 9/1/2018 at 12:16 PM, _Cloudy_ said:

drop it 4 inches on the arse

That wont work. Too much. Will destroy the handling. No amount of fork height adjustment can compensate.

Search for a used link (pull rod) off a KX450F. They fit the 250F, cost about $50, and are a few mm shorter than the stock link.  The length varies by year model, but any will be better than your mega long linkage.  I have a 2010 450F link in my 2010 250F and really like it.  I didn't swap it to lower the bike though. The KX250F feels pretty low to me.  I did it to change the linkage ratio a little.

The stock rear spring should be good for riders down to 72kg. As notorious said, measure your rider and static sag to check your rear spring rate is correct for you.  I'm 75kg and like my stock springs for the ride height and travel. But your 2013 bike has the (ordinary) SFF fork and I dunno about the spring rate in it.

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