Jump to content
99grandtouring

400S front end bouncing off rocks, fat guy suspension settings...

Recommended Posts

Hey guys, I've had the DRZ400S for a few months now and have been playing around with the suspension settings trying to get it to work better for me.

With that being said, I know it needs at a minimum re-sprung, and that'll come this winter.

But in the mean time from the stock setting I stiffened up the compression 4 clicks on the front only because of nose dive under braking on pavement, well when I went offload I noticed the front end seemed to stiff and was bouncing around / off of rocks, especially on rocky hill climbs.

 

So should I soften it back up or is there a way to adjust it so it doesn't do this? Like stiffen the rear up more? adjust rebound some ? whats the secrets to tuning a suspension?

I'm looking at getting new springs but am worried that going stiffer springs (although correct for my weight) will make the bike as it feels now, really stiff off road.

My son and I do mainly trail riding / no jumps, with a lot of rocky terrain so having the suspension a little compliant is better in my opinion vs stiff.

Thanks!

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hey guys, I've had the DRZ400S for a few months now and have been playing around with the suspension settings trying to get it to work better for me.
With that being said, I know it needs at a minimum re-sprung, and that'll come this winter.
But in the mean time from the stock setting I stiffened up the compression 4 clicks on the front only because of nose dive under braking on pavement, well when I went offload I noticed the front end seemed to stiff and was bouncing around / off of rocks, especially on rocky hill climbs.
 
So should I soften it back up or is there a way to adjust it so it doesn't do this? Like stiffen the rear up more? adjust rebound some ? whats the secrets to tuning a suspension?

I'm looking at getting new springs but am worried that going stiffer springs (although correct for my weight) will make the bike as it feels now, really stiff off road.
My son and I do mainly trail riding / no jumps, with a lot of rocky terrain so having the suspension a little compliant is better in my opinion vs stiff.
Thanks!
 
Get the right springs and you'll be able to tune it easier for your needs. Instead of trying to adjust it at the far end of the available adjustment, you'll be more in middle and start with a better baseline.

I weigh 240 lbs and will need springs soon too. Currently have mine adjusted stiffer but it still sucks. Springs are the only answer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can't give you a number but the best thing to do is go find a nice gravel forest road and start clicking on the adjusters. My bike has stiffer springs now but I can say the rebound was too stiff and wouldn't let the compression work correctly.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess what I'm trying to figure out is if compression gets stiffer should rebound get softer or harder? if its less likely to compress wouldn't you want it rebounding / expanding faster to stay on the ground? Or should it be slower?

I'm worried stiffer springs would raise seat height on me too which would be bad for me.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, 99grandtouring said:

I guess what I'm trying to figure out is if compression gets stiffer should rebound get softer or harder? if its less likely to compress wouldn't you want it rebounding / expanding faster to stay on the ground? Or should it be slower?

I'm worried stiffer springs would raise seat height on me too which would be bad for me.

 

Start with proper springs and learn to ride with the bike at the recommended ride height..  You will never have a well handling bike until you do.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 I'd go in a couple clicks on the rebound (hard), also bleeding the air out of the forks regularly is a good thing to do

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, 99grandtouring said:

if you make rebound hard does that mean it rebounds (expands) faster or slower?

Slower

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Think in terms of speed, not force.  Close the clickers to slow things down, open them to speed things up.  Save the "force" talk for the springs.

Edited by ptgarcia

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 If you were to turn your rebound clickers all the way in, then sit on the bike with your finger applying the front brake, then push up and down on the handlebar and get a feel for it. Then back your clickers out 10clicks and try it again, you'll feel a difference, it'll be much 'springier' then

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree starting with the right spring rate and sag setting is the first step. If your riding down the trail with the suspension already half compressed , it will feel harsh matter where you put the clickers. If your worried about the bike being too tall, it's not the right bike for you.
Rebound i like to set it as soft (quick) as possible without feeling wallowy, springy.
Compression set for feel, soft(quick) for plushness, but may feel dippy, wallowy. Firm(slow) for more control, but may feel more harsh. Tire pressure goes hand in hand with compression damping, too much and it will feel harsh, bounce off rocks rather than absorb them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This can get confusing...

Springs come in a rate. The rate reflects the additive force required to compress the spring by a defined distance. For example 5Nm per cm. 

Compression and rebound adjustments adjust the SPEED at which the suspension compress and rebound. You can turn the clickers all you want, you will not effect an undersprung fork or shock. 

The compression stack itself defines where in the stroke the speed will change. The clickers allow minor changes to the speed defined by the stack. 

With an undersprung suspension you’re chasing yourself in circles trying to fix a problem through the clickers. You need to adjust the rate, not the speed, that the suspension moves. 

  • Like 1
  • Helpful 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The right springs are night and day better, incredible even. Anyone saying otherwise doesn't weight over 220. My stock valving is workable in slow rocky stuff with the right springs. Bike needs a revalve and springs if you're gonna pound whoops on it.

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What tire pressure are you running?    a few less PSI will soften up the hits just don't go down too far and get bent rims.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/7/2018 at 8:46 AM, Gary in NJ said:

This can get confusing...

Springs come in a rate. The rate reflects the additive force required to compress the spring by a defined distance. For example 5Nm per cm. 

Compression and rebound adjustments adjust the SPEED at which the suspension compress and rebound. You can turn the clickers all you want, you will not effect an undersprung fork or shock. 

The compression stack itself defines where in the stroke the speed will change. The clickers allow minor changes to the speed defined by the stack. 

With an undersprung suspension you’re chasing yourself in circles trying to fix a problem through the clickers. You need to adjust the rate, not the speed, that the suspension moves. 

Sure can.....................

Springs + valving = force.

Damping coefficient  is damping force divided by velocity.

So force of damping is dependent on velocity.

Spring force is a constant as defined by Hooke's Law and not velocity dependent. https://phys.org/news/2015-02-law.html

The equation describing the  motion is a second order partial differential equation with constant coefficients. The fact the equation has a name is a clue that it is difficult to solve.

https://www.shimrestackor.com/Physics/Spring_Mass_Damper/spring-mass-damper.htm

Until you get both the damping and the spring rate correct, you will have a suspension that misbehaves in certain situations.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:


×