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Best spin bikes?

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I’m interested in getting a spin bike, does anyone have any recommendations of what brand or type or even price I should be looking at? 

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Great question!  I would strongly recommend that you look at a unit known as a stationary trainer that you can put your road or mountain bike on.  This way you can train outdoors during the week and the use it at the track as a warm up tool.  A couple of simple units are made by Kinetic or Cycle-Ops (there are more than these two).  This provides you more options.  

If you are looking for something only from home, look at systems like Zwift and the Wahoo system integration.  The reason why I recommend these is because you can dial the bicycle in to fit you optimally and get more out of your workouts without risking pulling or straining a tendon, muscle or tendon.  

Once you get your set up please hit me up via email at Contact@CoachRobb.com and I will send you some bike workouts that you can implement to improve your speed, strength and endurance using the bicycle. 

Yours in sport and health,

-Coach Robb 

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Thanks for the input Rob, I really don’t have a good road bike now, so that’s why I was looking for a spin bike. Just something else to mix it up with my concept 2 rower.

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6 minutes ago, pete11 said:

Thanks for the input Rob, I really don’t have a good road bike now, so that’s why I was looking for a spin bike. Just something else to mix it up with my concept 2 rower.

Definitely look for some used bikes.  You can pick up a mac daddy bike for a really good price.  Go to your local bike shop where they sell high end bikes, they usually take in bikes that are in great shape but someone wants the latest color or gadget.  The bike shop can make sure that the bike fits your correctly.   I have had clients pick up $5000 bike for less than $1000 (not that you have to go this price point).  Please keep me posted.

-Coach Robb 

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I bought a Wahoo KickR wheel off trainer that connects online so I can "virtually" ride with others, friends or not on Zwift. As close to the real ride as you can get, with a screen to follow and interaction too.

Otherwise, get the Peloton bike, which also links up to online classes and group rides, which is very motivating. You can fined them used on Ebay for around $1500 plus membership (about $20/mo)

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I bought a Wahoo KickR wheel off trainer that connects online so I can "virtually" ride with others, friends or not on Zwift. As close to the real ride as you can get, with a screen to follow and interaction too.
Otherwise, get the Peloton bike, which also links up to online classes and group rides, which is very motivating. You can fined them used on Ebay for around $1500 plus membership (about $20/mo)

Membership for Peloton is $39 a month.

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I have Keiser M3 spin bikes in my facility. They are a little more expensive, but not many moving parts to wear out. Find a used one.

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Another vote for a stationary trainer and pedal bike. I don't have a fancy trainer that connects to Zwift, but I still get by (there are ways to bypass that, by simply getting a speed meter).

The second benefit to this is that road bikes are awesome and during the summer time you can go explore with whatever one you choose. Something you can't do with a spin bike.

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5 hours ago, Sierra_rider said:

I also recommend an actual bike with the trainer, opens up a lot more opportunities. 

I completely agree.  I like to have a mountain bike to both warm up on the trainer with along with using it as a "pit bike".  This also gets you outside on the trails working on balance and eye hand coordination (two key components of going fast).  

One thing to think about, when you use your own bike set up on the trainer (MTB or Road Bike) is that the bike fit (which every one should have done) will keep you from becoming hurt associated with bad biomechanics (typical challenge of a stationary type bike).  

Bike - trainer - heart rate monitor and you have the ideal warm up tools.  

-Coach Robb 

 

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2 hours ago, Coach Robb said:

I completely agree.  I like to have a mountain bike to both warm up on the trainer with along with using it as a "pit bike".  This also gets you outside on the trails working on balance and eye hand coordination (two key components of going fast).  

One thing to think about, when you use your own bike set up on the trainer (MTB or Road Bike) is that the bike fit (which every one should have done) will keep you from becoming hurt associated with bad biomechanics (typical challenge of a stationary type bike).  

Bike - trainer - heart rate monitor and you have the ideal warm up tools.  

-Coach Robb 

 

Initially I didn't want to comment on the bike fit, as I don't have much experience with spin bikes, but the few I've seen didn't have the best fit. I couldn't get the seat high enough, bars in right position, etc. Most people probably don't give it a 2nd thought, but I'm pretty particular about bike fit. I've got my main road bike set up exactly how I want it...the right frame size, right stem length, bar height, saddle-stem length, right seat, all measured down to the 1/16 of an inch. The old bike that is on the fluid trainer, is set up almost exactly the same, just with different gearing.

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Hey guys WATIGE here, also a professional coach, I have a slightly different top recommendation. I do agree with Robb and others that are saying use your own Road or gravel grinder pedal bike, this way you can get your real bike fit to your ergonomic needs and not face the same potential overuse issues due to it not fitting your body. As for the trainer idea? Great idea, BUT you can take it too a new level with KREITLER ROLLERS! So what’s different about these? Well you end up with something that will push your training, with rollers what you have are like 3 rolling pins. 2 in back for the rear wheel and one up front, there is a large rubber band running from the front roller to the closest of the 2 rear rollers. So you’re actually riding in place with no support! The advantage of this is multifaceted but the 2 biggies are riding a line and when I doubt go faster!
You have to maintain a straight line or you’ll come off the rollers and tip over! Next our ingrained response to feeling unsteady is to SLOW down! If you do that on rollers you’ll tip over! The ONLY way to regain your stability, just like on our “REAL” bike (moto) is to go faster! This retrains year instinctual response while at the same time forcing a physiological response to make that happen!
Amazing tool! Now what if you wanna space out during the session? Well that’s where you have the option to use the front end triangle brace. This attachment anchors to the outsides of the front roller and your bars. Now you can’t fall over or off but you will still feel the rear squirm if your form gets sloppy or you’re sprinting. There is also a resistance “fan” attachment that runs off the front roller providing additional resistance and a cooling breeze for you!
All my athletes have rollers and a basic trainer such as the ones Robb mentioned.
Good training and keep it rubber side down!
Charlie Johnson Biomechanist

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