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2019 RR Race Edition Models - First Look

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2 hours ago, firffighter said:

Is it me or is everyone on this site seem to be collecting social security, on Medicare, and eating dinner at Shari's at 4 pm😁

 

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You'll be with us someday (Hawaii and I made it to the finish line in our fire careers) if you're lucky.

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This thread had devolved into recipe sharing and retirement! 

Pretty much all anyone needs to know about the in depth analysis on Beta's shared here in the TT Beta forum😁

And, yes, I'm looking forward to retiring from firefighting! Hopefully healthy and ready to ride and explore for many years to come! 

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3 minutes ago, firffighter said:

Ah, broth, makes sense. Nothing too hard for those dentures 😆

Still line up on race day though.. even with all the old injury aches and pains..:thumbsup::ride: It’s great to beat riders half your age. If they beat you it doesn’t matter anyway. Shit they are supposed to be faster!!!

 

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1 hour ago, dyrtmon said:

You'll be with us someday (Hawaii and I made it to the finish line in our fire careers) if you're lucky.

It’s a roll of the dice . Must enjoy where others haven’t. The attitude is gratitude. :ride:

Put a search on harvard cardiac studies for firefighters . Work on some prevention while you can.

Edited by hawaiidirtrider
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7 hours ago, motoxgiant said:

Curing the frequent stalling should be Job#1 on that Husky.

That's one of it's many strengths.  You just don't ride fast enough.

The failing clutch slave is another reason to just go faster.

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13 hours ago, firffighter said:

Agreed, thus my comments above. You AARP guys need to band together 😀

 

Heck KRAN and GP are in their 60's! Good on em! 

I'm 48, definitely not the rider I was at 38 and most certainly not the rider I was at 28! Hopefully make it to 58 and beyond! You guys are inspirational old farts 😉

 

 

I just turned 60 last month.  My bro is 58 and regular riding buddy is 51.  Most of the other hard core local riders are late 40s and up.  Overall of course I think we are going slower on the fast stuff, but faster in the slower stuff.  What has worked for me is putting in the gym time, and the older you get the more important it is if your going to still play rough and enjoy the sport without feeling like death afterward.  Also, evaluating and tuning your setup and suspension the BEST it can be, not just OK, plays a big part in feeling strong near the end of a tough day.  I focused on it this year and it has really paid off.

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1 hour ago, THE KRAN said:

The failing clutch slave is another reason to just go faster.

Lol. babyarmholdingapple should be very thankful. Luckily his '17 Husky has an electric starter that actually functions (only took 6 years for KTM to fix), no gas sloshing into his lap from leaking faulty gas cap (brilliantly designed by the Austrian brain trust), and a kick stand that won't crumble as soon as the bikes weight hits it (another 6 years to fix).

Hopefully, he's got the service bulletin for his '17 though and fixed his 12mm bolt on his idler gear, so he doesn't destroy his case. 

 

Man, it's tough living with these tier 1 bikes. 😁

Edited by firffighter
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1 hour ago, GP said:

I just turned 60 last month.  My bro is 58 and regular riding buddy is 51.  Most of the other hard core local riders are late 40s and up.  Overall of course I think we are going slower on the fast stuff, but faster in the slower stuff.  What has worked for me is putting in the gym time, and the older you get the more important it is if your going to still play rough and enjoy the sport without feeling like death afterward.  Also, evaluating and tuning your setup and suspension the BEST it can be, not just OK, plays a big part in feeling strong near the end of a tough day.  I focused on it this year and it has really paid off.

Haven't you heard most of us don't use all the stock suspension so why waste time and money evaluating?? Best is stock!

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4 minutes ago, weantright said:

Haven't you heard most of us don't use all the stock suspension so why waste time and money evaluating?? Best is stock!

Those $1000+ suspension set-ups for the elderly should probably be used to save up for a mobility scooter. You're going to break a hip out there riding at breakneck speeds on those death machines 😉

 

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On a serious note, it is cool that you guys are sharing about riding as you get a bit long in the tooth. I have an amazing group of guys I get to ride with, one a retired firefighter who's 67. He's as solid a rider as you'll ever come across, tackles the gnar without hesitation and is very good through the technical terrain. Might not be quite as fast, but never holds us up. Also keeps himself in top physical condition. 

 

On the opposite end, we have a few guys in their 20's, built like super heroes and have no fear. Fun to ride with those guys! They don't mind banging off of trees. 

Edited by firffighter
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1 hour ago, GP said:

I just turned 60 last month.  My bro is 58 and regular riding buddy is 51.  Most of the other hard core local riders are late 40s and up.  Overall of course I think we are going slower on the fast stuff, but faster in the slower stuff.  What has worked for me is putting in the gym time, and the older you get the more important it is if your going to still play rough and enjoy the sport without feeling like death afterward.  Also, evaluating and tuning your setup and suspension the BEST it can be, not just OK, plays a big part in feeling strong near the end of a tough day.  I focused on it this year and it has really paid off.

61 here.  I have had to drop my speed and agreession while riding in order to complete a 5 hour ride without needing the ambulance..... still figuring out a mid-week work out routine that does not leave me worse off.  Getting quality sleep is my biggest problem........but it's all good.   There is a never ending supply of riders slower than I am.......but they eventually speed up, and move on, so I have to keep the paddock full as possible with riders that won't kill me.....

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54 and still racing. I can go demonstrably faster on CC stuff. Primarily due to being able to take big front end impacts at speed and still having a wider ranger of tunability. I did however win a 2017 50+B Championship on the 2013 250 stock OC forks and ended up 18th overall, so they are not junk by any means. It will be interesting to see how the new Sachs ZFs respond on the 200. By the way, I am having a terrible season this year on the CC forks even though I am faster with them, perhaps because I am faster with them, lol, tied for 3rd with 2 races to go and another guy 2 points back. I plan on racing the 200 next year. One thing that has to be said is the BETA is an incredibly durable and tough machine. It is rock solid and reliable and can take a pounding. It is a great choice and at the edge of the weight durability maximum.

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13 hours ago, firffighter said:

This ^^^^^ 

Juha Salminen considered to be the greatest enduro rider of all time ran his 300 completely flat, a gear high, with spooge dripping everywhere, engulfed in smoke from running so rich. He always commented to set your bike up for Traction

Juha after 6 world enduro titles, came over to the U.S. and absolutely dominated our best enduro riders in the GNCC, winning back to back championships. Then, went back to Europe and won 2 more titles! 

I taught Juha that. Learned it on my 350 Alpina equipped Amal. He still sends me Christmas cards. I'm awesome!

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3 hours ago, THE KRAN said:

61 here.  I have had to drop my speed and agreession while riding in order to complete a 5 hour ride without needing the ambulance..... still figuring out a mid-week work out routine that does not leave me worse off.  Getting quality sleep is my biggest problem........but it's all good.   There is a never ending supply of riders slower than I am.......but they eventually speed up, and move on, so I have to keep the paddock full as possible with riders that won't kill me.....

I knocked myself out briefly back in June.  Brother came around corner behind me and saw me cartwheeling through the air on a short, tight but smooth and fast straight section.  Scary part is I have ridden and lightly maintained this trail for a few years and have no idea what happened or what I hit to this day.  I back it down a notch in situations like that now.  My 51 year old buddy likes to really pin it on the smoother sections but with outlaw trail you never know whats next as it changes constantly, not like a race course that's been prepped.  I say go ahead I'll pass you when it gets bad again!

KRAN, TRX works for me better than anything I have done.  Start easy and work up, you can do it almost anywhere. 

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7 hours ago, firffighter said:

Lol. babyarmholdingapple should be very thankful. Luckily his '17 Husky has an electric starter that actually functions (only took 6 years for KTM to fix), no gas sloshing into his lap from leaking faulty gas cap (brilliantly designed by the Austrian brain trust), and a kick stand that won't crumble as soon as the bikes weight hits it (another 6 years to fix).

Hopefully, he's got the service bulletin for his '17 though and fixed his 12mm bolt on his idler gear, so he doesn't destroy his case. 

 

Man, it's tough living with these tier 1 bikes. 😁

Starters are a pain to change when they do go aswell. My buddy had a hard time changing his out. I’m sure after doing it once it will be easier the next time. Still all things being equal I don’t want a ktm or husky if I can get a Beta 300. Why get a taller bike too. I got a tall seat for my Beta only to go back to a stock lower height  seat later. There’s no choice there for ktm/ husky unless spending bigger to lower the whole bike.  Sunday rides lowered his new 6 days KTM. I could do that too but ktm Husky doesn’t work better for my needs and they are more expensive. I don’t give a shit about the counterbalancer. Betas have little vibration anyway. I mean if anyone wants a husky or any brand bike go get it. But I’d never work so hard to go out of my way to go to other brand threads to try to sell Beta to them. :bonk: :smirk:  Guys come to Beta threads asking? Sure I’ll tell em my experience.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KJOQ3Io3NrY&feature=share

Edited by hawaiidirtrider

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17 hours ago, firffighter said:

This thread had devolved into recipe sharing and retirement! 

Pretty much all anyone needs to know about the in depth analysis on Beta's shared here in the TT Beta forum😁

And, yes, I'm looking forward to retiring from firefighting! Hopefully healthy and ready to ride and explore for many years to come! 

:smirk: Isn’t that the dream? Somehow get to the point to where one has time and means to ride? The other part is health though.. gotta be healthy enough to ride. It’s also management of health too. Ive had a couple of heart attacks and have diabetes and high blood pressure and have some onld and new injuries to manage. At 40 I was still good to go for mx and racing and good enough to keep racing A class and mx. I had no clue things would change. At 58 I’m taking chances riding on blood thinners that I have to be on for my 4 stents in my heart. Still I can ride. I just feel I have to ride and race more controlled. I can crash and bleed out internally on blood thinners. Choosing to do less high speed riding and not push the edge is my chosen happy medium. I ride as fast as I can and not falling and improve technique and not ride over my head. I’m not riding as fast as I used to but I’m still riding and racing and surprisingly still winning sometimes. I don’t even have to place though . Just being on the starting line is awesome. .. and riding.. Betas are great in technical too. It’s where I have the best chance of doing well in a race. I blitz a little in open sometimes. It’s hard to hold back the old race inclinations but then I settle down into a controlled fast clip that is steady to catch those that fade toward the end of the hard races.

Some say that it’s too much of a risk to ride on blood thinners. I’m just adapting so I still can race and ride. Betas are great in technical. It fits me fine. If I still was racing mx aswell Id still go Beta given what’s out there.

Edited by hawaiidirtrider
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16 hours ago, hawaiidirtrider said:

Put a search on harvard cardiac studies for firefighters . Work on some prevention while you can

I'm lucky to work for a department that is very proactive concerning firefighter health. We've adopted several policies in the past decade in order to protect personnel as much as is feasible from risks related to cancer, heart disease, back/shoulder injury, etc. I guess that's one advantage to working for a major metropolitan city with nearly 1000 firefighters. 

In fact, we have adopted NFPA full physical standards each year which includes full heart monitor stress test, bloodwork, UA, colonoscopy, etc, all free for firefighters. 

We have done 2 sleep studies recently and are considering a possible work schedule change as research indication points to significant increase in cancer, heart disease, diabetes, and early dementia related to shift work and sleep deprivation. That's one huge drawback of the career and working in a very busy downtown company going on multiple calls all night. 

I  am lucky, in that I have been able to maintain a very balanced approach to life, a wonderful marriage of 25 years, 5 amazing kids, great friends, healthy eating and lots of exercise, etc and have not had any negatives from the career, knock on wood! But, it's always in the back of your mind and a month ago on of our Lt's,  who I worked with on shift together for 2 years was diagnosed with stage 4 mesothelioma, he's 51, on the job! A sobering reminder of the massive dangers involved with this job! 

The riding is simply part of the balance of life for me. It's not the end game and riding more won't be Nirvana, it'll just be more fun to be able to go whenever I want with less planning and a bit more time to enjoy it, but I won't be riding non-stop as I enjoy far too many other aspects in life. I love backpacking, kayaking, camping, riding my sport touring bike, do a couple of running events each year, but mostly just being with my family! Riding is highly rewarding and it is something that can't be replicated and has brought a lot of joy over the years, but I don't live to ride. I think if I rode a ton more it'd take away from the joy. I get about 1000+ miles in the woods each year and that's plenty for me. 

Hope you continue to ride with as good as health as possible Hawaii and others who've shared as well! It's a wonderful experience and something I've found very rewarding. 

Now this thread is officially off the rails, sharing Oprah moments. We're starting to sound like a Lifetime channel movie 😂

Edited by firffighter
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1 hour ago, firffighter said:

I'm lucky to work for a department that is very proactive concerning firefighter health. We've adopted several policies in the past decade in order to protect personnel as much as is feasible from risks related to cancer, heart disease, back/shoulder injury, etc. I guess that's one advantage to working for a major metropolitan city with nearly 1000 firefighters. 

In fact, we have adopted NFPA full physical standards each year which includes full heart monitor stress test, bloodwork, UA, colonoscopy, etc, all free for firefighters. 

We have done 2 sleep studies recently and are considering a possible work schedule change as research indication points to significant increase in cancer, heart disease, diabetes, and early dementia related to shift work and sleep deprivation. That's one huge drawback of the career and working in a very busy downtown company going on multiple calls all night. 

I  am lucky, in that I have been able to maintain a very balanced approach to life, a wonderful marriage of 25 years, 5 amazing kids, great friends, healthy eating and lots of exercise, etc and have not had any negatives from the career, knock on wood! But, it's always in the back of your mind and a month ago on of our Lt's,  who I worked with on shift together for 2 years was diagnosed with stage 4 mesothelioma, he's 51, on the job! A sobering reminder of the massive dangers involved with this job! 

The riding is simply part of the balance of life for me. It's not the end game and riding more won't be Nirvana, it'll just be more fun to be able to go whenever I want with less planning and a bit more time to enjoy it, but I won't be riding non-stop as I enjoy far too many other aspects in life. I love backpacking, kayaking, camping, riding my sport touring bike, do a couple of running events each year, but mostly just being with my family! Riding is highly rewarding and it is something that can't be replicated and has brought a lot of joy over the years, but I don't live to ride. I think if I rode a ton more it'd take away from the joy. I get about 1000+ miles in the woods each year and that's plenty for me. 

Hope you continue to ride with as good as health as possible Hawaii and others who've shared as well! It's a wonderful experience and something I've found very rewarding. 

Now this thread is officially off the rails, sharing Oprah moments. We're starting to sound like a Lifetime channel movie 😂

Well there’s no more new 2019 info anyway. There’s nothing new to add. :excuseme:

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3 hours ago, firffighter said:

I'm lucky to work for a department that is very proactive concerning firefighter health. We've adopted several policies in the past decade in order to protect personnel as much as is feasible from risks related to cancer, heart disease, back/shoulder injury, etc. I guess that's one advantage to working for a major metropolitan city with nearly 1000 firefighters. 

In fact, we have adopted NFPA full physical standards each year which includes full heart monitor stress test, bloodwork, UA, colonoscopy, etc, all free for firefighters. 

We have done 2 sleep studies recently and are considering a possible work schedule change as research indication points to significant increase in cancer, heart disease, diabetes, and early dementia related to shift work and sleep deprivation. That's one huge drawback of the career and working in a very busy downtown company going on multiple calls all night. 

I  am lucky, in that I have been able to maintain a very balanced approach to life, a wonderful marriage of 25 years, 5 amazing kids, great friends, healthy eating and lots of exercise, etc and have not had any negatives from the career, knock on wood! But, it's always in the back of your mind and a month ago on of our Lt's,  who I worked with on shift together for 2 years was diagnosed with stage 4 mesothelioma, he's 51, on the job! A sobering reminder of the massive dangers involved with this job! 

The riding is simply part of the balance of life for me. It's not the end game and riding more won't be Nirvana, it'll just be more fun to be able to go whenever I want with less planning and a bit more time to enjoy it, but I won't be riding non-stop as I enjoy far too many other aspects in life. I love backpacking, kayaking, camping, riding my sport touring bike, do a couple of running events each year, but mostly just being with my family! Riding is highly rewarding and it is something that can't be replicated and has brought a lot of joy over the years, but I don't live to ride. I think if I rode a ton more it'd take away from the joy. I get about 1000+ miles in the woods each year and that's plenty for me. 

Hope you continue to ride with as good as health as possible Hawaii and others who've shared as well! It's a wonderful experience and something I've found very rewarding. 

Now this thread is officially off the rails, sharing Oprah moments. We're starting to sound like a Lifetime channel movie 😂

Well there’s no more new 2019 info anyway. There’s nothing new to add. :excuseme:

Oops sorry double post. I do find it interesting that a variety of firefighters that don’t know each other from different places ended up buying Beta. Curious huh.  

As far as Oprah and lifetime channel? I don’t know. I think it’s along the lines of practicality and real world management a bit. That’s how fire guys and girls act. It’s not touchy feely. Its not cold or emotional. .. sort of get in the mode to handle business and not waste time with stuff  that isn’t more important till another time. It’s like especially in our job we see lots of death so we know don’t f*** around. Everyone has an expiration date. It’s more like quickly assess and manage to do what you have to do to get to the next level. 

The 2019 Betas are too new for me. I haven’t seen the 2018 Betas yet that a couple of my friends have. I need to take a spin on them. Hmm . One has endurospec cartridges. I wonder if he might sell his stock forks? Hmm

Edited by hawaiidirtrider

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