Jump to content
WILLY THE WORT

Tubliss removed from BYOB

Recommended Posts

I got a price on a tire at a local installed. Took wheel in and he goes "oh I dont touch tubeless, fewer and fewer of us will anymore, sorry" I am like...um wtf. Its not that big a deal. I was being lazy but actually think changing tires is easier with them. I guess he told me they had so many issues installing tires with them. All I could do is scratch my head on that one

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, jms130 said:

still there at 11:14pm est

tubliss 2.JPG

I did a byob on an '18 RS500 and it did not show up.

Oh, I know why, Tubliss is not DOT. 

Never mind then.

I was just playing until the RE BYOB is open.....

31 minutes ago, Vsack said:

I got a price on a tire at a local installed. Took wheel in and he goes "oh I dont touch tubeless, fewer and fewer of us will anymore, sorry" I am like...um wtf. Its not that big a deal. I was being lazy but actually think changing tires is easier with them. I guess he told me they had so many issues installing tires with them. All I could do is scratch my head on that one

 

That's a nice story

Edited by THE KRAN

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been using them since day one, haven't used a tube since.  Wheel has little to do with it if its cleaned and prepped right.  Tires and technique are the biggest variables.  Large bead fronts, like the current fatty fad tires, being the biggest hassle as there is little room to work.  I go through a lot of tires a season here from the rocks, and do  so many changes including my neighbor's bikes, I've developed my own techniques and some modded/special tools.   Not going to get into details and derail the thread, but most issues are liner damage dismounting tires.  Its not a good system for a ham fisted wrench like my buddy.  All that said if your not riding harder trail where your always searching for traction and ways to get it, probably not worth it.  For me, what and how I ride, its great though.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Install using slime and it doesn't matter new or used tires. My only issue with TuBliss was ripping knobbies which can't be plugged. For some reason for me tire selection is key while others never have an issue. I have switched to mousse and my choice of tires are 2x. Plus install is faster, easier and never an air issue. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, THE KRAN said:

It's not there anymore

I just received delivery of my 2019 300RR with TUbliss.  It's not available on the RR-S 4 strokes that are street legal.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, Vsack said:

I got a price on a tire at a local installed. Took wheel in and he goes "oh I dont touch tubeless, fewer and fewer of us will anymore, sorry" I am like...um wtf. Its not that big a deal. I was being lazy but actually think changing tires is easier with them. I guess he told me they had so many issues installing tires with them. All I could do is scratch my head on that one

 

I have been using them in both the front and rear for two years now and I believe the issues people are having are mostly due to technique.  I can change a Tubliss in the same time as a tube and am a lot less worried about a pinch with Tubliss.  Finished second in an offroad race last weekend where I road the last 4 of 7 laps with a flat front.  Pulled the tire off, cleaned the wheel and Tubliss bladder, plugged the hole cut by a sharp rock and it is holding air and ready to go again.  Moose are the only other system that can survive that.  Moose is a good system but I personally don't like them because they are heavier than the Tubliss and are not adjustable like Tubliss.  

I took the time to learn how the system was designed, picked tough carcass tires (Goldentyre and MotoZ), followed the installation instructions exactly and I personally have never been happier.  Be aggressive with the soap and water!

I am an expert rider and mechanic with 40 years of racing and extreme trail riding experience to back up my opinion on this.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The 1st Tubliss set I installed on a KTM six days was not hard but it tooka few hours for the set as I watched the vids, read the install docs, and did the step by step prep.
That was a few years ago...

Just did a set today, 17 WR450F, took me 30min each for full 1st time install. would have been less time had I not spent 10 min cleaning the rim of old rubber and dirt.
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
48 minutes ago, Big64N said:

I have been using them in both the front and rear for two years now and I believe the issues people are having are mostly due to technique.  I can change a Tubliss in the same time as a tube and am a lot less worried about a pinch with Tubliss.  Finished second in an offroad race last weekend where I road the last 4 of 7 laps with a flat front.  Pulled the tire off, cleaned the wheel and Tubliss bladder, plugged the hole cut by a sharp rock and it is holding air and ready to go again.  Moose are the only other system that can survive that.  Moose is a good system but I personally don't like them because they are heavier than the Tubliss and are not adjustable like Tubliss.  

I took the time to learn how the system was designed, picked tough carcass tires (Goldentyre and MotoZ), followed the installation instructions exactly and I personally have never been happier.  Be aggressive with the soap and water!

I am an expert rider and mechanic with 40 years of racing and extreme trail riding experience to back up my opinion on this.

I thought the same until I realize I seldom changed air pressure especially in the front. 3-5psi on the rear and 8 in front. I found several ways to achieve this same feel with a mousse.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, BMRFlagstaff said:

What’s byob?

Build your own Beta.

Basically, it's like ordering a new car with the options you want. You go online, pick the "upgrades" you want and they are factory installed before it ships to your dealer.

Edited by woods-rider
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
36 minutes ago, Bermudacat said:

Not a big fan of filling my rims with corrosion causing water and dish soap. The slime method is my choice. 

Have you actually seen corrosion from this? I just spooned my 3rd front tire and 5th or 6th rear tire onto the same Tubliss setup I've been running on my 2016 since the first week I brought it home 2 1/2 years ago.  I squirt that soapy water anywhere and everywhere it'll go... up to the point that it's squirting out of every place it possibly can when I air up the the Tubliss bladder and tire.  The inside of my rims still looks great.  No sign of corrosion anywhere and I've never discovered residual moisture from previous tire changes when installing new ones.  I like the soapy water because it's less messy, less expensive, and more readily available than slime tire sealant.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Not a big fan of filling my rims with corrosion causing water and dish soap. The slime method is my choice. 

 

Actually, Slime reacts with bare aluminum where anodizing is scratched and oxidizes, combining and leaving hard deposits that can affect the way the liner expands from the drop center. I have seen and repaired this on several wheels after using it for a couple years. I use silicone grease on rears, that always seal, makes things easy, fast, and neat. For fronts that can be stubborn with some tires I use Quadboss sealant, that is good with aluminum. The inner rim surfaces, inner liner, and bladder are all coated with silicone grease on both front and rear wheels. This allows the liner and bladder to expand evenly without chaffing. Keep tools and rims burr free before R&R. In general, the less trauma on a bead during install the better chances for a leak free seal. I use a Baja Nopinch with the edges rounded smooth.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As an 'Older Rider' byob used to appear on party invitations, meaning "Bring your own bottle"

I think it is very progressive of Beta to allow you to spec your own bike, I wish that was available with Husky

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:


  • Similar Content

    • By wachterxc
      Down here in mexico, land of the miracle and home of the weird, ive seen people use the same mousse for over 2 years. They claim that though it has become softer, it remains in place and performs well. How long have you used the same mousse for? 
      Rubber side down my guys,
      Saludos,
    • By AtlasEnduro
      I am pretty sure my buddy posts here, FX! I have lurked for a couple years. You all have answered so many questions via search, since I started riding. So thank you!
      I really hope you enjoy this video. I plan to be active here, making an account was the hardest part... 😛
    • By JWellz
      Anyone have any unbiased opinion if they were buying a new dual sport.   Would you go with the new Honda CRF450L or the Beta 430rrs?   Why
    • By hawaiidirtrider
      I just noticed that Matteo Cavallo’s bike has a kicker and estart like how Holcombe runs..
      I guess lightest bikes aren’t everything. 
       
       
    • By MotoXRacer_19
      As the title suggests, I've been debating the idea of throwing in a high compression piston. It will bump the compression in my 2014 KTM 350 XC-F from 13.5:1 to 14:1. First and foremost my main question is, because I live under 1000 ft and usually run 97 octane REC gas, will I have to change the fuel I run or not? Also, will I have to change out the cams to aftermarket and re-time the whole motor and ignition? I guess I really don't know what to expect so any advice will definitely help! Attached below is a photo of the bike I plan on putting it in.  

×