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Micrometer reccomendations

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Starrett, Etalon, Brown and Sharpe or Mitutoyo all are nice quality ones.

That being said I use a J.T. Slocomb Co. ones that were made in the early 1900's in Rhode Island.  They pass calibration tests with flying colors and have been used by me for decades without any issues.  They were my grandfathers who was a machinist at Case for 40 years.

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Most if not all micrometers are 100% accurate. What sets them apart is how they 'feel' (the action) and durability of the markings. Nature of design (simple threads per inch) makes them always accurate. They are not like a vernier where the mechanism matters.

If it is going to be used by a 'guy in a garage', even a Harbor Freight is perfectly fine. You are working in a machine shop, pony up for the top of the line. Same reason a dealer mechanic buys top shelf tools and a guy at home is fine with less expensive ones.

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27 minutes ago, William1 said:

Most if not all micrometers are 100% accurate. What sets them apart is how they 'feel' (the action) and durability of the markings. Nature of design (simple threads per inch) makes them always accurate. They are not like a vernier where the mechanism matters.

If it is going to be used by a 'guy in a garage', even a Harbor Freight is perfectly fine. You are working in a machine shop, pony up for the top of the line. Same reason a dealer mechanic buys top shelf tools and a guy at home is fine with less expensive ones.

My micrometer and calipers are both HF stuff, work fine.  My dial gauge is a high end Japanese one I've had since the early 70s, but I would never spend that kind of money on one now.

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1 hour ago, William1 said:

Most if not all micrometers are 100% accurate. What sets them apart is how they 'feel' (the action) and durability of the markings. Nature of design (simple threads per inch) makes them always accurate. They are not like a vernier where the mechanism matters.

If it is going to be used by a 'guy in a garage', even a Harbor Freight is perfectly fine. You are working in a machine shop, pony up for the top of the line. Same reason a dealer mechanic buys top shelf tools and a guy at home is fine with less expensive ones.

Im a machinist by trade. 

And that is the BEST explanation of what separates just ok mics' from heirloom quality ones, that I've ever heard!

I'll use that same description when asked by a apprentice for advice on picking out the right tool.

Sorry, op. Didnt mean to high jack your thread..

 

 

Edited by Fore-50
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