Jump to content

Fixing flats on the trail with Tubliss system

Recommended Posts

I had a slow leak recently from a cactus thorn and ended up fixing it in my garage at home. While doing so a few concerns came up, like possibly puncturing the Tubliss insert when cleaning out the hole and inserting the plug. With that in mind I deflated the insert to minimize the risk, but had the luxury of re-inflating it to the required 110 psi with my compressor. I was wondering what the preferred method is out on the trail. Is it possible to re-inflate the insert to the required pressure with a co2 cartridge, or is it even necessary to deflate the insert first? I've carried the small compact bicycle pumps with me in the past, but hate wearing a pack and don't really like putting it in the airbox. Plus, I wasn't too successful when I tried to inflate the Tubliss insert with it. I like the compactness of the cartridges and an inflator hose much better.

I used the ultra hd tubes before but still ended up with a flat from hitting a cactus. The thorns are like nails here in Az. which led me to the Tubliss system to make fixing flats easier. But I guess it won't do much good if I puncture the insert too. Any input would be appreciated. I'm starting to feel like mousses might be the only option around here. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Scott_321 said:

I had a slow leak recently from a cactus thorn and ended up fixing it in my garage at home. While doing so a few concerns came up, like possibly puncturing the Tubliss insert when cleaning out the hole and inserting the plug. With that in mind I deflated the insert to minimize the risk, but had the luxury of re-inflating it to the required 110 psi with my compressor. I was wondering what the preferred method is out on the trail. Is it possible to re-inflate the insert to the required pressure with a co2 cartridge, or is it even necessary to deflate the insert first? I've carried the small compact bicycle pumps with me in the past, but hate wearing a pack and don't really like putting it in the airbox. Plus, I wasn't too successful when I tried to inflate the Tubliss insert with it. I like the compactness of the cartridges and an inflator hose much better.

I used the ultra hd tubes before but still ended up with a flat from hitting a cactus. The thorns are like nails here in Az. which led me to the Tubliss system to make fixing flats easier. But I guess it won't do much good if I puncture the insert too. Any input would be appreciated. I'm starting to feel like mousses might be the only option around here. 

Problem with mousses is they don't really like temps over 90*, they break down faster.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Scott_321 said:

I had a slow leak recently from a cactus thorn and ended up fixing it in my garage at home. While doing so a few concerns came up, like possibly puncturing the Tubliss insert when cleaning out the hole and inserting the plug. With that in mind I deflated the insert to minimize the risk, but had the luxury of re-inflating it to the required 110 psi with my compressor. I was wondering what the preferred method is out on the trail. Is it possible to re-inflate the insert to the required pressure with a co2 cartridge, or is it even necessary to deflate the insert first? I've carried the small compact bicycle pumps with me in the past, but hate wearing a pack and don't really like putting it in the airbox. Plus, I wasn't too successful when I tried to inflate the Tubliss insert with it. I like the compactness of the cartridges and an inflator hose much better.

I used the ultra hd tubes before but still ended up with a flat from hitting a cactus. The thorns are like nails here in Az. which led me to the Tubliss system to make fixing flats easier. But I guess it won't do much good if I puncture the insert too. Any input would be appreciated. I'm starting to feel like mousses might be the only option around here. 

Just be gentle putting in the reamer, twist it back and forth as you put it in. the red liner is very hard to puncture so as long as you aren't going crazy with it you should be fine

Put a bunch of slime in the tire and you probably won't even notice it next time a thorn punctures it.

Edited by Wild Alaskan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, cjjeepercreeper said:

Problem with mousses is they don't really like temps over 90*, they break down faster.

Faster? I don't think so. I have ridden with mousses (NitroMousse) year round, including multiple rides a week in the summer in Las Vegas and mine didn't break down at all in regular riding and racing. From my experience they are incredibly resilient and responsive. I thought about both Tubliss and NitroMousse before deciding on the latter because it's the only flat-proof system on the market and that is especially important in the desert, where everything is sharp. Complete peace of mind. 

To the OP, you live in Arizona and ride on the same type of terrain as I do in Nevada. Go with NitroMousse, you'll completely forget they are there and can ride over a cactus field without worrying about a flat tire. They last a very long time, too. I know of multiple pro racers who regularly go 3,000 miles on them in high-speed racing, which "wears them out quicker".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Doug. said:

Faster? I don't think so. I have ridden with mousses (NitroMousse) year round, including multiple rides a week in the summer in Las Vegas and mine didn't break down at all in regular riding and racing. From my experience they are incredibly resilient and responsive. I thought about both Tubliss and NitroMousse before deciding on the latter because it's the only flat-proof system on the market and that is especially important in the desert, where everything is sharp. Complete peace of mind. 

To the OP, you live in Arizona and ride on the same type of terrain as I do in Nevada. Go with NitroMousse, you'll completely forget they are there and can ride over a cactus field without worrying about a flat tire. They last a very long time, too. I know of multiple pro racers who regularly go 3,000 miles on them in high-speed racing, which "wears them out quicker".

I didn't say they break down instantly.  All I said was that they will BREAK DOWN FASTER in very hot temps.  Ask the manufacturer, they will tell you the same thing.  It says so right on Nitromousses web site.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, cjjeepercreeper said:

I didn't say they break down instantly.  All I said was that they will BREAK DOWN FASTER in very hot temps.  Ask the manufacturer, they will tell you the same thing.  It says so right on Nitromousses web site.

Right, you did say faster. That is exactly what I said I disagree with. 🤷‍♂️

I know what the website says and I'm sure that can happen. Based off my experience and the experience of professionals who race much faster and much longer than I do, the point I was making was that it's not a problem. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:


×