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Can you put aftermarket rings on an OEM Piston?

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I just bought a 1983 KX80E and found an new old stock piston for $30 but can’t find rings. I know Wiseco make rings for it that cost around $45, so I was wondering if I could pair the aftermarket rings with the oem piston. (Same size).

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Maybe. If the rings were the same thickness and the grooves in the piston were the same. Also the location pin on the piston could be different and interfere with the rings. Just ordered the complete Wiseco piston and ring set and not worry about it. Yes it will cost a little more but it's going to work. 

I just did a search on eBay and found OEM rings for $30

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Why would you want to? a piston and ring set for that bike is less than $100.00 and I didn't even search very hard... that included piston rings and gaskets...

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ring composition matches the type of cylinder they were intended for (if it's a good brand).

so as long as it's the same dimensions and is made for the same type cylinder then go for it.

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25 minutes ago, jaguar57 said:

ring composition matches the type of cylinder they were intended for (if it's a good brand).

so as long as it's the same dimensions and is made for the same type cylinder then go for it.

Composition is something to worry about, but if they don't seat right in the piston, it could cause a long list of issues that could cause a simple overheat, seize, complete piston blowout, bottom end blowout on the Conrod depending on speed when the topend goes etc

There's alot of science and chemistry between a piston and the rings that go with it. 

 

Definitely buy a entire kit. Don't reuse your old base gasket either, obviously. 

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Don't worry, be happy. No really I think the last post was excessively negative. If the rings are made of cheap material then they will wear out fast, that's all.

And the rings are designed material-wise for the cylinder (iron or chromed), not the piston. Hey Norcal I don't know why you didn't also include destruction of the transmission and the rear hub exploding. Maybe also the rear shock developing a leak just due to proximity to the engine. Oh and of course it would all happen right as he is cresting a jump and hiss next waking moment will be opening his eyes in the hospital unable to move in a body cast. Oh and then his wife would leave him, his boss would fire him, and his country would export him for being a public menace. My god, maybe it could even start a world war. Yeah, best not to use those evil aftermarket rings, all terrible things would happen.

ps- I ride an AX100 with a piston for a GP100 with aftermarket rings. Oh and I have to grind down one of the piston pins and put in my own at another location.

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17 hours ago, Dodging_roost said:

Why would you want to? a piston and ring set for that bike is less than $100.00 and I didn't even search very hard... that included piston rings and gaskets...

^This. It's not worth spending $30 plus shipping(?) for a new piston, then finding out you just bought a set of Wiseco rings that don't fit. 

Or you can just call Wiseco and ask them if their rings will fit a stock piston.:excuseme:

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Rule 1:  Do it right or do it twice.

Rule 2:  Don't step over dollars to pick up a dime.  

Rule 3:  Buy the best and expect a lot.

Rule 4:  Get the advice of professionals and manufacturers.  We got the experience but they got the science and engineering.   

Rule 5:  Start over at Rule 1.

Selah.

Edited by Jimmy Pascol
Shake it, don't break it. Wrap it, I'll take it.
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Ring measurements aren't standardized , meaning they differ in dimensions between brands. Thinner rings in wide grooves isn't much better than thicker rings in narrower grooves. Same with the depth of the grooves and the width of the rings. It could be an expensive lesson.

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