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Slowing Too Much in Tight Turns

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When riding single track trails I feel like I have to slow down far too much for turns at times. Things like switch backs, and tight weaving sections its like I have to come nearly to a stop to reset and then continue my turn and I can blast out of the second half of it. The first half I just can't get down and I feel like its killing my race times. Almost as if I can't get the bike in position to sweep around the turn. Not that I'm too far inside really but just that I can't get the bike to turn tight enough at the speed I'm at. Are there any body position tips when standing? I'm getting faster these days and this feels like a real hindrance. 

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7 minutes ago, bikedude987 said:

sit. down. (when turning tight)

Then I just have to stand up again when speed picks up. I can turn fine sitting down. I want to do it standing, I watch the A riders do it and they look like they are on a mountain bike the way they flow through corners. 

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17 minutes ago, AUbraaap said:

Then I just have to stand up again when speed picks up. I can turn fine sitting down. I want to do it standing, I watch the A riders do it and they look like they are on a mountain bike the way they flow through corners. 

You didn't get what @bikedude987 said: "sit. down. (when turning tight)." It's the "when turning tight" that you are missing. On fast flowing serpentine trails you can remain standing and really flow when you use the proper technique, but when the turns are really tight, the fast way is to sit (and if necessary for foot clearance, get your foot out by the front axle) because your body is down close to the center of mass of the bike, and you can really toss the bike down that way (and, yes, you will then find yourself needing to stand again as speed picks up). That's the price you pay for getting through a tight corner fast.

As for the feeling that you have to slow down too much going into the corner, are you countersteering? (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Countersteering) If you are riding fast, you'll need to slow for the turn, but you finish braking at the same moment you initiate countersteering to pitch the bike down into to turn on neutral or slightly positive throttle. That totally eliminates the feeling of hesitation in the turn. It's one fluid motion: brake hard until you pitch the bike down, holding light throttle until it's time to pick the bike up with smooth hard throttle, and haul ass 'till the next turn and repeat the process again. The tightness and/or the character of the turn determines whether you drop to the saddle or just take a deep bend in your legs as you set up the turn.

But if you don't countersteer, you are doing it the slow way.

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@Old Plonker okay, I didn't consider that first part, that yes in some corners its best to just sit I suppose. 

I can say that I have never heard of countersteering going into a corner, so I am doing it the slow way! This is mind blowing for me but I will be sure to try it this weekend on my next ride. This idea does make sense to me though because that feeling of hesitation is there. It's hard to explain but sometimes I just have to throw the bike into a lean to turn. This seems waaay more fluid.

Thank you for the input. 

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3 hours ago, AUbraaap said:

@Old Plonker okay, I didn't consider that first part, that yes in some corners its best to just sit I suppose. 

I can say that I have never heard of countersteering going into a corner, so I am doing it the slow way! This is mind blowing for me but I will be sure to try it this weekend on my next ride. This idea does make sense to me though because that feeling of hesitation is there. It's hard to explain but sometimes I just have to throw the bike into a lean to turn. This seems waaay more fluid.

Thank you for the input. 

Work your way into it slowly if it's new to you or you'll low side hard the first time. Just play around and see how it goes. Your body position counts too, since you want your body mass to be in line with the center of mass of the bike, or just a bit above it, depending on traction and speed. 

It's not a vague feeling. You feel like you are flicking the bike to the lean angle you need with a very positive force, and when you get to the right lean angle you feel like you just stop the countersteering instantly. But you move your body with the lean of the bike and when you do it on soft or slippery ground it is the greatest feeling on two wheels to find you've pitched the bike into an instant and smooth power sliding turn that you hang on with the throttle. But like I said, work your way into it if it's new to you.

Good riding, and enjoy!

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On 10/18/2018 at 9:52 PM, Old Plonker said:

Work your way into it slowly if it's new to you or you'll low side hard the first time. Just play around and see how it goes. Your body position counts too, since you want your body mass to be in line with the center of mass of the bike, or just a bit above it, depending on traction and speed. 

It's not a vague feeling. You feel like you are flicking the bike to the lean angle you need with a very positive force, and when you get to the right lean angle you feel like you just stop the countersteering instantly. But you move your body with the lean of the bike and when you do it on soft or slippery ground it is the greatest feeling on two wheels to find you've pitched the bike into an instant and smooth power sliding turn that you hang on with the throttle. But like I said, work your way into it if it's new to you.

Good riding, and enjoy!

Alright, In the last couple weeks I have done my best to apply your suggestions and I have noticed a difference. I'm getting smoother and maintaining speed better through all corners. I added a little body position modification with it by pushing my outside knee into the bike and slightly turning my body into the turn. I really appreciate the advice! Shouldn't be long before its second nature. 

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Look Ahead!  If you are looking at the exit of the corner when you are entering it you will naturally get off the brakes sooner and on the gas sooner. 

 

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41 minutes ago, AUbraaap said:

Alright, In the last couple weeks I have done my best to apply your suggestions and I have noticed a difference. I'm getting smoother and maintaining speed better through all corners. I added a little body position modification with it by pushing my outside knee into the bike and slightly turning my body into the turn. I really appreciate the advice! Shouldn't be long before its second nature. 

Good to hear it's working for you. Good riders never stop learning. For lots of excellent tips, I recommend Paul Clipper's The Art of Trailriding (Amazon only). I have it on my phone, and often flip through it when I find myself thinking about riding problems I've had. The way Paul writes, it's like having a knowledgeable friend in your pocket.

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