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Revalve vs. Rebuild

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Hi TT! I have a 2002 YZ 125 and want to get the suspension done... my forks are leaking, and I need new seals. Should I also rebuild it or am I good? I don't know anything about susp. so please let me know! Also I have a rear shock that is extremely bouncy, and whenever I go over the jumps, it literally takes me 3 feet off the ground. So should I get that rebuilt or revalved? I'm on a budget so be aware. What is servicing then? Isn't that where you put new nitrogen and oil? What company does that? Is that rebuilding? Thanks.

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Servicing is done after so many hours (as little as 25h for motocross track riding) 

replace the fluid, nitrogen recharge the shock's bladder, replace wear items like bushings, dust and oil seals and, inspect for unusual wear.

Spent fluids degraded the action of suspension and worn bushings can bind the forks/increase friction.

 

Rebuilding is replacing or refurbishing items that have worn with usage, like the coating worn off some components, shock's bumper etc.

Wear perhaps due to not servicing the suspension often enough.   (gritty oil, binding etc.)

 

Revalving (often accompanied or following re-springing)

These are mass produces bikes, the manufacturers chosen settings are what they've figured will suit the most riders.

That usually favors riders in the 160lbs to 180lbs range, lighter or heavier riders often need softer/stiffer springs.

If lacking in stock form, revalving is done to optimize the performance of the suspension to best suit the rider's: 

height/weight, skill level and, specific usage (motocross, trail, off-road etc.)

 

On a 16 year old bike, you must first inspect and likely rebuild to 'almost like new' condition before doing any fine tuning experiments.

As with proper spring rates, good linkage, suspension &chassis bearings are also important components of a proper working suspension.

 

Edited by mlatour

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5 hours ago, mlatour said:

Servicing is done after so many hours (as little as 25h for motocross track riding) 

replace the fluid, nitrogen recharge the shock's bladder, replace wear items like bushings, dust and oil seals and, inspect for unusual wear.

Spent fluids degraded the action of suspension and worn bushings can bind the forks/increase friction.

Based off what you've told me, I should get the rear shock serviced. Then the tuner will inspect it and would rebuild any part that needs to be replaced. Based off what I told you about how it throws me off my seat going over small hills, what do you think I should do?

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Have you measured and set your sag?

Does the bike have it's original springs, what do you weight?

What tire pressure do you run?

Have you checked that clickers are set to nominal specs.? (or about mi-way in their range)

 

Apart from worn components, some faults are perhaps user issues...

Do you mostly sit when riding and hitting these obstacles that buck you off?

 

Nevertheless if not done it the past few seasons, the forks and shock are at a minimum likely due for a refresh (oil, bushings etc.)

Any fine tuning efforts with worn or damaged components is a waste of time.

Edited by mlatour

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2 hours ago, mlatour said:

Have you measured and set your sag?

Does the bike have it's original springs, what do you weight?

What tire pressure do you run?

Have you checked that clickers are set to nominal specs.? (or about mi-way in their range)

 

Apart from worn components, some faults are perhaps rider issues...

Do you mostly sit when riding and hitting these obstacles that buck you off?

 

Nevertheless if not done it the past few seasons, the forks and shock are at a minimum likely due for a refresh (oil, bushings etc.)

Any fine tuning efforts with worn or damaged components is a waste of time.

I have not set my sag, but I know the shocks are bad, they wouldn't be this bouncy. Bike does have it's original springs. I weigh 200lbs but I'm loosing it, let's just say 180lbs. Idk the tire pressure. What are clickers?

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1 hour ago, Goon Rides said:

I have not set my sag

 

1 hour ago, Goon Rides said:

Idk the tire pressure. What are clickers?

 

You need to find an owner's manual a read it over a few times.  .pdf versions are likely free to download somewhere on the web.

A YZ125 is a race bike, not just an add gas and ride toy, it needs preparation if you expect decent results.

Edited by mlatour

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8 minutes ago, mlatour said:

 

 

You need to find an owner's manual a read it over a few times.  .pdf versions are likely free to download somewhere on the web.

A YZ125 is a race bike, not just an add gas and ride toy, it needs preparation if you expect decent results.

my dad does that part of the work... what are clickers tho?

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The adjustment screws at both ends of the forks that fine tune the compression and rebound dampening.

Shock also has those plus an extra high speed compression adjustment nut.

 

Your dad isn't the one riding it, only you can interpret what the bike is doing, what you'd like to improve.

The more you read and re-read both the owner's and service manuals, the more you familiarize and understand all the available adjustments.

Edited by mlatour

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On 10/19/2018 at 4:17 PM, mlatour said:

The adjustment screws at both ends of the forks that fine tune the compression and rebound dampening.

Shock also has those plus an extra high speed compression adjustment nut.

 

Your dad isn't the one riding it, only you can interpret what the bike is doing, what you'd like to improve.

The more you read and re-read both the owner's and service manuals, the more you familiarize and understand all the available adjustments.

it seems sooooooo confusing...

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You bought an MX race bike, not a play bike.

There are simpler entry level trail bikes which require less maintenance and tuning abilities but

in return offer limited performance (engine, suspension) 

Edited by mlatour

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