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Dialing out shock harshness?

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I have a 17 TX 300 and had it on single track today and it was feeling good. Was dialing in my front fork and found a place where it seems to be working well. Rear shock though I think has potential but I’m having a problem with it kicking and feeling hard on square edges. So big logs that you would wheelie over instead of soaking it up it kicks and is harsh. I believe this is my high speed compression as my low speed is backed all the way off. 

So my question is how can I adjust my high speed while still keeping my chassis balanced? I did it once before because I didn’t know what I was doing and turned the bike into a chopper lol. Didn’t feel good. I believe I need to check my sag, adjust high speed then re adjust sag to compensate. Is that correct? Thanks 

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Having your low speed all the way back off is maybe part of the issue, you may be too low in the stroke. If you add to it too much rebound damping you get the recipe for a low ride.

About the high speed related to the SAG this is a concept I have trouble to imagine...if your SAG increases when you back off the high speed it makes me think about a major balance issue between hydraulic and spring rate. 

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I’ve backed off the high speed once on a diff bike and it sat low in the stroke. Found that the low speed didn’t seem to do this but the high speed adjust defenitly did. 

 

Actually thinking about what you said maybe the as I wheelie into a log the low speed could be compressing it too much and now I’m low in the stroke already 

Edited by Onzalimey

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KTM/Husky don't put ENOUGH high speed compression in their shocks.  Put the rebound where it's soft but doesn't pogo, and put the comp clicker in the middle.  Then go to 1-1.25 turns out from full hard on high speed compression.    

Especially if you're wheelie-ing into stuff, you're blowing through the stroke and bottoming - hence the harshness. 

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Gonna have to play around with it. I agree it’s either bottoming hard or I’ve got too much rebound in it. (Edit: OR I’ve not go enough comp and it’s harsh) I was just worried that adjusting high and low speed compression in the shock affected the chassis balance but the guy I get to do my suspension says it won’t. So will play around and see 

Edited by Onzalimey

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On 10/22/2018 at 7:38 PM, Onzalimey said:

Gonna have to play around with it. I agree it’s either bottoming hard or I’ve got too much rebound in it. (Edit: OR I’ve not go enough comp and it’s harsh) I was just worried that adjusting high and low speed compression in the shock affected the chassis balance but the guy I get to do my suspension says it won’t. So will play around and see 

Statically, it wont.  But dynamically, you bet it will.  If you have too quick low speed compression and too much rebound the shock will pack up and stay at a lower ride height as long as there are similar inputs (bumps) to it.  Visa versa if too much LSC and too little Reb.  

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8 hours ago, bikedude987 said:

Statically, it wont.  But dynamically, you bet it will.  If you have too quick low speed compression and too much rebound the shock will pack up and stay at a lower ride height as long as there are similar inputs (bumps) to it.  Visa versa if too much LSC and too little Reb.  

Understanding that more now. Doesn’t seem easy to find that info though. From what I understand though no low speed damping and it will squat under acceleration or potentially pack and stay low with not enough rebound. I guess high speed could have a similar feeling if you had some quick bumps in a row. 

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12 hours ago, Onzalimey said:

Understanding that more now. Doesn’t seem easy to find that info though. From what I understand though no low speed damping and it will squat under acceleration or potentially pack and stay low with not enough rebound. I guess high speed could have a similar feeling if you had some quick bumps in a row. 

exactly.  Taking off or accelerating hard it will squat and transfer weight to the rear faster (can be useful in some forms of racing).  When you're cruising along and you get to a spot with some 'chatter' or washboard or the like, it will tend to pack because each successive hit compresses the shock more than it can rebound in the small amount of time between hits.

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