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Has anybody tried these headsets?

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https://www.amazon.ca/Fodsports-Motorcycle-Communication-Bluetooth-Headphones/dp/B01MZ0IMLR/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1539829288&sr=8-4-fkmr0&keywords=Fodsports+Bluetooth+Intercom+helmet+bt+inserts

My wife is looking at buying a couple of sets of these for my son, me, dad and nephew for dirt riding.

Anybody know anything good or bad about them?

I have heard that Collets are the best but dont know much about any of them...

Cheers,

Jon

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Looks like a decent product for not much $$.....reviews have been good as well for the most part.

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I have some that are similar to these, the v4 version. The sound quality is surprisingly good and is plenty loud. I believe that those will only be able to have 2 people talk at a time (you have to switch channels to talk to someone else). If you want 4 people to be able to talk at one time you would want to get the v4 or 4 person version. They are a little tricky to setup, but there are videos on YouTube.

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The one in the link is the G6 version, 6 can talk.

You have the V4 and you like them, they work good for dirt riding? 

Do the batteries last long enough when listening to music?

Thanks,

Jon

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Yeah I like them. They work well for my son and I. I haven't listened to music with them. The battery lasts long enough for at least one day of riding. I actually haven't had a battery die while using it.

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Looks painfully chinese. 

Scala, Cardo, Collett, Sena ... all "name brand" communicator companies.

Collets are usually 900MHz, where the others are typically class-1 bluetooth.  Newer models include a "mesh networking" feature that can allow a group to comm within the group as long as each rider in the group can be a "link in the chain".  One link gets separated, chain breaks into two parts.

900MHz can punch through trees better than bluetooth (2.4GHz) can.

Be aware with these types of communicators, they're typically vendor-locked.  A limited feature set may exist between brands, but in order to use the product to its capabilities, everyone in the group needs to be on the same brand/system. 

 

On snow, I ride with FRS/GMRS equipment.  Just about everyone has it, they're inexpensive and work well.  Remote speaker-mic on the shoulder of my pack.

On dirt, group management makes radios a lot less useful.  Stop at intersections, regroup and do a head-count before continuing on.  Make sure lead/sweep riders know the trip plan.  I almost never use radios on the moto within a group.

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4 hours ago, SnowMule said:

900MHz can punch through trees better than bluetooth (2.4GHz) can.

Microwave ovens heat food by vibrating the water molecules. The resonant frequency of water is 2.4GHz. So radio and TV engineers want to stay as far away from 2.4gHz as the FCC will let them. As a result, 2.4gHz has been an unregulated frequency. WiFi, Bluetooth, Zigbee and all sorts of other random things use 2.4gHz. Unfortionately, 2.4gHz signals don't go thru water very well. So they all suck in the rain or fog, of thru tree leaves. Or even big piles of humans, since humans are mostly big bags of water.  900mHZ is a lot better than 2.4gHz, but it too is mostly just line of sight plus a bit.

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Any radio equipment is going to be line-of-sight without infrastructure.

My expensive Motorola portables?  Yup, line-of-sight.  (But it's line-of-sight to a networked tower on the top of a mountain, which is where the range comes from.)

Those super-ultra-mega-power-baofeng-9000 radios with a super-duper-antenna on it?  Also line-of-sight. 

 

An increase in power won't give you a proportional increase in range.  It can help when you're at the edge of the range though. 

 

Water/microwaves are the reason 2.4GHz is unlicensed (not unregulated; it's most definitely regulated).  It's why wifi, bluetooth, etc all live there. 

Noise floor also has a lot to do with the range equation.  It's pretty high in 2.4G with everything that's using that band. 

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Communicators are great for riding; my son and I are new riders and we do trail riding only.  We use Sena SMH10; easy to install on the helmets; and once we used them a few times, easy to link up together (meaning user functions).  And yes, like others have stated, line-of-sight when it comes to good comm signal.  Batteries are good; we ride at least 6-8 hours when we go.

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