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Measuring chain wear

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A few months after getting my 230F in 2014... I guess I figured out that changing the tires (original?) would be a good idea. That was when I discovered the chain was riveted.

So I put on a Primary Drive 520 ORH X-Ring Chain 520x110 for $57, which has a clip-style master link.

This chain has been lubricated somewhat regularly (more on that later) but otherwise ignored. The recent discovery that the master link clip was hanging loose convinced me it was time to give this chain some attention.

Measuring the chain wear had been on my list so I found out how in a TT "wiki" post. Which is not quite right.

Anyway, I figured it out I think. Here is what you want to do in one pic. 

Measuring - Pin to Pin.jpg

Check a few sections of chain as above and if they are over 3.18 the chain has stretched more than 2% and needs to be replaced.

Otherwise it will start tearing up your sprockets.

Edited by RedMesa
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5 minutes ago, RedMesa said:

A few months after getting my 230F in 2014... I guess I figured out that changing the tires (original?) would be a good idea. That was when I discovered the chain was riveted.

So I put on a Primary Drive 520 ORH X-Ring Chain 520x110 for $57, which has a clip-style master link.

This chain has been lubricated somewhat regularly (more on that later) but otherwise ignored. The recent discovery that the master link clip was hanging loose convinced me it was time to give this chain some attention.

Measuring the chain wear had been on my list so I found out how in a TT "wiki" post. Which is not quite right.

Anyway, I figured it out I think. Here is what you want to do in one pic. 

Measuring - Pin to Pin.jpg

Check a few sections of chain as above and if they are over 3.18 the chain has stretched more than 2% and needs to be replaced.

Otherwise it will start tearing up your sprockets.

I go though 2 to 4 new clip type master links per chain. Riveted master link bad news. All my 230 steel rear sprocket long life.

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12 minutes ago, bajatrailrider said:

I go though 2 to 4 new clip type master links per chain. Riveted master link bad news. All my 230 steel rear sprocket long life.

Master link is now on my list to check after every ride and I am stocking spares.

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39 minutes ago, RedMesa said:

Master link is now on my list to check after every ride and I am stocking spares.

The side of clip and pins that hold it get ground down. The clip comes off.

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I don’t use any master link of any kind. Just Purchase a 25 ft roll (cheaper) and use a chain breaker to press one side plate off chain at the link that I want then press side plate bank on a peen pins with a ball peen hammer using another hammer on back side for back up.
Bullet proof, no worries, no failures, no master links to wear out. Saves me money for race fuel.
As soon as my front sprocket shows any wear I replace it, saves chain which in turn saves rear sprocket.

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15 hours ago, StevetheSnake said:

Geez rivet master links are the only way to go. You’ll never loose a chain through the cases from a missing clip. I use them on all the dirt bikes. 

Do you break and re-rivet if wheel removal etc. is needed on the trail, or what?

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6 minutes ago, RedMesa said:

Do you break and re-rivet if wheel removal etc. is needed on the trail, or what?

You could. But if you remove it generally you put a new one in or on the trail maybe a clip link until you get back. But normally you remove the rear wheel or just push the bike backwards to remove something stuck. I’ve seen way more problems with chains going through the cases than a issue with a rivet link. They spec it on many of the bikes. 

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No good info clip type for trail riding good deal  Twice one rider with bobwire in chain nightmare. Second rock in counter shaft gear. Rivet chain no thanks not ever.

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OK, next up.... chain type... here is my take....

Unsealed
(+) Lower friction puts more power to the wheel
(+) Master link easier to install because no rings to compress
(-/+) Shorter life but cheaper

O-ring / X-ring
(+) More friction reduces power to the wheel? On modern designs maybe not? see post by Dwight Rudder. X-ring is much lower friction than O-ring.
(-/+) Longer life but more expensive
(-) Need to compress rings, so master link requires chain press tool. And for clip-style, master link pliers are good too.

Dwight Rudder on dyno test
https://thumpertalk.com/forums/topic/370039-do-o-ring-chains-really-rob-hp/?do=findComment&comment=3285299

 

Edited by RedMesa

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40 minutes ago, bajatrailrider said:

No good info clip type for trail riding good deal  Twice one rider with bobwire in chain nightmare. Second rock in counter shaft gear. Rivet chain no thanks not ever.

Carry snips and back the bike up if something is stuck. Worse case you loosen the rear wheel or take it off. Rivet links never come off. Clips do. 

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38 minutes ago, RedMesa said:

OK, next up.... chain type... here is my take....

Unsealed
(+) Lower friction puts more power to the wheel
(+) Master link easier to install because no rings to compress
(-/+) Shorter life but cheaper

O-ring / X-ring
(+) More friction reduces power to the wheel? On modern designs maybe not? see post by Dwight Rudder. X-ring is much lower friction than O-ring.
(-/+) Longer life but more expensive
(-) Need to compress rings, so master link requires chain press tool. And for clip-style, master link pliers are good too.

Dwight Rudder on dyno test
https://thumpertalk.com/forums/topic/370039-do-o-ring-chains-really-rob-hp/?do=findComment&comment=3285299

 

I run the narrow link DID rivet Xring chains  and Supersprox sprockets for the longest lasting. = Done. 

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I've use regular chains,  even buying a spool of Reynolds in England, and ring chains. Also never lost a clip. The DID 520VT2 chain is a narrow X ring chain designed for bikes not designed for a regular wide ring chain.  Here is my summary:

Life Cycle costs of a ring chain is much less than non ring: I use DID 520VT2 chains and I dry film lube them after every washing. Without wet lube to attract dirt the sprockets last longer. My longest running chain on my most used bike is now 8 years old and sprockets are beginning to look a little worn,  rear is aluminum and  front OEM steel. So I paid half again as much for the VT2 chain but avoided the cost of a new non ring chain each year (I ride in the wet and muddy PNW). I also  avoided a lot of sprocket replacements. The Honda CRF250/450Xs come new with a narrow 520 X ring chain, I replaced the 05 chain on my CRF250X in 2014.

Maintenance on a ring chain is minimal with washing and spray lubing with dry film lube.  Because the wear on chain and sprockets is so low chain adjustment is almost non existent. I do check once a year and I have the XR snail adjusters marked for quick alignment if I need to pull the wheel.

Problems with the VT2 chain is the side plate on the clip master link is a very tight fit so for long rides I carry a MSR Mini press (and spare clip link) for trail side maintenance. Have said that,  maybe I travel over prepared as I've only needed to split the chain once on the trail  in the last ten years. And in more than 40 years of riding I've only needed to split a chain trail side a few times. 

 

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Held off commenting on chain lubrication until someone mentioned it. Looking at RM's chain, that caking is what most conventional oil base lubes produce. It's a grinding compound, fine grit mixed with oil on the links and sprockets. By using a dry silicone spray that won't happen. Plus no hub, rim, chain cleaning, longer chain and sprocket life, and only $2.50 a can.  

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5 minutes ago, firsthere said:

Held off commenting on chain lubrication until someone mentioned it. Looking at RM's chain, that caking is what most conventional oil base lubes produce. It's a grinding compound, fine grit mixed with oil on the links and sprockets. By using a dry silicone spray that won't happen. Plus no hub, rim, chain cleaning, longer chain and sprocket life, and only $2.50 a can.  

Might hold off commenting until you see my wear numbers ;) But that is Maxim Chain Wax and yes it does build up.

Edited by RedMesa

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Is Russian begging question of fundamental link canon:  assume all of you clip-type master link users install closed end facing direction of chain travel?

One of my 230s has clip master link, one is riveted.  To properly install the riveted one, you need to use micrometer, etc., and I found it to be a tedious, hairy process.  The original equipment riveted-master-link chain I replaced like-for-like had the master installed too tight from the factory, and it was kinking/binding there and damaging the chain and prolly the sprockets somewhat too....  My proper-install job of the rivetted master is working fine so far, without binding/kinking or fast wear, but so is the clip-master chain on the other bike....

Edited by BSAVictor
Boris Badenuv

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1 minute ago, firsthere said:

No offense RM 🙂, couldn't help noticing the build up on that chain.

No worries, I thought it was funny. It really is a mess. I don't clean my bikes much.

And you may be right about the dry silicone. I am contemplating a change.

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If you have ring chain do a test:  Thoroughly clean the the chain and sprockets then apply a dry film lube (I like the kind with Teflon), then do a ride and inspect the chain and sprockets for dirt. For next ride lube the chain with a non drying chain lube and repeat the ride.  All of that accumulated dirt in the sticky oil makes a lapping compound to wear the sprocket and chain rollers. That is a legacy from non ring chains that needed regular lube to protect the inside of the roller. A ring seals lube inside the roller and dirt out, greatly increasing the life of the chain. 

If you don't ride in dust, water, or mud than that reduces the advantage of a ring chain.

Edited by Chuck.
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