Jump to content

Tackling a XR200r street tracker project with zero mechanical/modification knowlege.

Recommended Posts

4 hours ago, RK-REX said:

I've done a few projects like this over the years. Not all bikes, but still lots of cutting, welding, fabricating, etc. One piece of advice I can give...

When you are doing the fabrication stage, where you're trying to get the "look" you want, don't fully weld everything until you are sure it all works together. A few tack welds will hold it all in place and allow full assembly. I've spent a lot of time cutting and grinding because something needed to be moved a 1/4" and was already welded. Much easier to zip off a tack weld. Even small brackets for holding whatever, don't weld it fully.

Once you have the bike completely built, everything is square, true, in line, wires hidden, etc. Then, take it all apart, finish your welds, do last minute tweaking of stuff, sanding, grinding, etc. THEN and only then, start the finish process. Paint and what not. Nothing sucks more than a very visible scratch in a project that's still not complete. Once you have the frame painted/coated, then wrap it with towels and masking tape when doing final assembly of big parts, engine, swing arm, forks. You are working on a budget with limited skills, take your time. By the time you've built it, pulled it apart, finished welds, paint and stuff, you will know this bike intimately and when you do the finish assembly, there shouldn't be any surprises. 

Remember, this isn't like watching (insert favorite bike/car building show here) on TV. They are financially/mechanically equipped and capable of fixing any oops that may happen when building. You're not in that position, you're learning and having a blast doing it, go slow and enjoy yourself.  I'm looking forward to watching the build. Take LOTS of pictures. 

SO TRUE^^^   Take it from someone who literally did what RX-REX said not to do. I have an 86 XR100 I took apart years ago and recently decided to start rebuilding. Unfortunately the FIRST thing I did was powder coat the frame and swingarm. Big mistake as the second I got it back from the shop I realized I never removed the steering stem bearing races from the frame and now they are one with the powder coat job and have to be replaced 😥. There are so many things you wouldn't even think of, or you will overlook, that are goin to happen along the way. Having patience, determination, and knowing it is not going to be a straight forward project and there will be many obstacles along the way, will most definitely help you to your end goal. Good Luck man, just remember you got plenty of help if needed and there is no such thing as a stupid question. Unless your my wife she can ask some stupid question!🤣

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the encouragement! Def keeps the stoke alive seeing everyone's excitement. 

In taking apart the engine it looked like it was originally dismantled to replace the cylinder, piston, and crankshaft. (Pic 1&2)

A replacement piston, cylinder,  and a seals/rings kit was already included. (Pic 3&4)

I ordered a crankshaft, bearings ect for a bottom end rebuild. All OEM Honda parts.

 

3884.jpeg

20181106_072847.jpg

20181106_073000.jpg

20181106_072922.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While waiting for parts to be delivered, the wire wheel and scotch brite dremel attachments came in. Time to try cleaning up some of the aluminium. I will be painting or powder coating the whole engine. May just spray them with ceramic paint engine enamel that is cured in an oven, but heavily considering getting a powder coating setup. I even found an electric oven in my neighborhood for FREE! Now I just need a 240 outlet in my garage to connect it. Haha. Then a decent starter kit from Eastwood is only $150, $200 with some colors. But as pointed out above, no rush on paint just yet.

20181105_170949.jpg

20181105_170957.jpg

20181105_171003.jpg

20181105_171010.jpg

20181105_171021.jpg

20181105_201323.jpg

20181105_201332.jpg

20181105_201340.jpg

20181105_201349.jpg

20181105_201357.jpg

20181105_201650.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, progress update...

Finally got all the specialty tools I needed to split the cases ordered and delivered, split the cases, bagged and labeled everything. Nothing seems to be damaged inside other than the crankshaft.

Also got the OEM Honda crankshaft, pin, and bearings in.

Lesson learned: you can't just rebuild the crank yourself. It has to be sent off and completed by a professional. 

I was referred to Ken O'connor Racing by a friend to get my crank rebuilt, so I need to pack it up and ship it out today.

While it's out...

My plan is to clean up the cases and check the specs on the internal components for wear and replace anything necessary.

I'll keep the updates coming!

20181115_075504.jpg

3884.jpeg

4212.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My obsessive compulsive side enjoys your sense of order. :smirk::thumbsup:

I do the same thing when I'm doing a major build of any kind. I go though more baggies in my shop than in my kitchen. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You're gonna have a pretty penny in this thing with all OEM Honda parts! But, at least you'll know it's built with good quality parts.

For someone that has no knowledge, it looks and sounds like you're on the right track with getting everything you need and keeping your parts in order. 

I never responded after you wrote in response to me a while back. You living in Florida, could be a good chance of getting a title for the bike and making it street legal. Seems you can tag just about anything in Florida from what I've seen while down there. As for the seat, I really don't need it I have 4 seats, 3 of which I should work on selling lol. However, you might consider selling it you could get $100 for it pretty easy in that condition. Then you can buy a custom seat or build one and have an upholstery shop pad and cover it to your liking. 

As for being around the block a few times, I'd say not with bikes. I mean yeah, my current bike has been a big headache and I've learned so much about it from the this site and from doing a lot of work to it. But I used to be a heavy equipment mechanic for a major pipeline contractor and learned a lot when it comes to fabricating and other things. 

Keep up the good work and keep us posted

  • Helpful 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, chadzu said:

It's not a bad idea to put a new oil pump in.

Ok. Thanks for the advice!

You may have noticed the oil pump housing still on the case. I am having a hell of a time getting the screws off! I used an impact screwdriver with no luck,  I may have gone too cheap on the impact, the bits got destroyed. Going to get a torch to see if that helps, may need new screws by the end of it. 😳

4264.jpeg

4268.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Daniel627 said:

You're gonna have a pretty penny in this thing with all OEM Honda parts! But, at least you'll know it's built with good quality parts.

For someone that has no knowledge, it looks and sounds like you're on the right track with getting everything you need and keeping your parts in order. 

I never responded after you wrote in response to me a while back. You living in Florida, could be a good chance of getting a title for the bike and making it street legal. Seems you can tag just about anything in Florida from what I've seen while down there. As for the seat, I really don't need it I have 4 seats, 3 of which I should work on selling lol. However, you might consider selling it you could get $100 for it pretty easy in that condition. Then you can buy a custom seat or build one and have an upholstery shop pad and cover it to your liking. 

As for being around the block a few times, I'd say not with bikes. I mean yeah, my current bike has been a big headache and I've learned so much about it from the this site and from doing a lot of work to it. But I used to be a heavy equipment mechanic for a major pipeline contractor and learned a lot when it comes to fabricating and other things. 

Keep up the good work and keep us posted

Thanks again for all the great info!

From the top...

Honestly, I quickly got a lil over my head with the costs going into this build. From the OEM parts to all the specialty tools, then the equipment I want for the fabrication part, it's going to get crazy. But anything I'm going to do or put my name on is going to be done right. (Toot Toot) haha.

I really appreciate the complements on my work, def encouraging! I've been watching so many videos, reading blogs, and my clymer manual, absorbing as much info and advice as possible. Its paid off so far for sure.

I also assumed it wouldn't be to hard to tag and title the bike in FL. As for the seat, THANKS, I would not have imagined it was worth $100. Sweet! I'll get it up online and see what happens. Couple quick questions on it: is it specific to XR/XL? And any places you reccomend posting it for a quick sell?

Thanks again man, stay tuned!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Before throwing heat at it... Throw it in the freezer overnight. Go buy some good bits for your driver, because YES you went way too cheap lol. A good bit won't twist like that. 

If you throw it in the freezer it'll shrink. Then when you take it out, as it warms up closer to room temperature and starts expanding, then try knocking those screws out. 

  • Helpful 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Daniel627 said:

Before throwing heat at it... Throw it in the freezer overnight. Go buy some good bits for your driver, because YES you went way too cheap lol. A good bit won't twist like that. 

If you throw it in the freezer it'll shrink. Then when you take it out, as it warms up closer to room temperature and starts expanding, then try knocking those screws out. 

Good idea, never thought about that.

If that doesn't work and you need to heat it, heat around the screws, not the screws themselves. The aluminum will expand faster than the steel screws and that might help loosen them. 

  • Helpful 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ugh, my 230 motor did the same thing. I have a new pump waiting, but those screws are a nightmare

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, mad maXR said:

Thanks again for all the great info!

From the top...

Honestly, I quickly got a lil over my head with the costs going into this build. From the OEM parts to all the specialty tools, then the equipment I want for the fabrication part, it's going to get crazy. But anything I'm going to do or put my name on is going to be done right. (Toot Toot) haha.

I really appreciate the complements on my work, def encouraging! I've been watching so many videos, reading blogs, and my clymer manual, absorbing as much info and advice as possible. Its paid off so far for sure.

I also assumed it wouldn't be to hard to tag and title the bike in FL. As for the seat, THANKS, I would not have imagined it was worth $100. Sweet! I'll get it up online and see what happens. Couple quick questions on it: is it specific to XR/XL? And any places you reccomend posting it for a quick sell?

Thanks again man, stay tuned!

Yeah you should look them up on Ebay. There are some people wanting $250 for them, and they're not in PERFECT original condition. I doubt they'll get the 250 for em, but, ya never know, someone might give in. 

The seats are no longer available for purchase, so they tend to go for a decent amount as long as in good shape. You can get aftermarket foam and covers though. Ebay and Craigslist are the 2 places that would go the quickest. There is the Marketplace here in TT as well.

As far as I know, the seat will only fit the XR200R from '85-'02, as well as some years of the XR250R I believe. Not sure what years though. 

  • Helpful 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, mad maXR said:

You may have noticed the oil pump housing still on the case. I am having a hell of a time getting the screws off! I used an impact screwdriver with no luck,  I may have gone too cheap on the impact, the bits got destroyed. Going to get a torch to see if that helps, may need new screws by the end of it. 😳

 

Unless my eyes are deceiving me, there are small dimples on each of the screws. If so, they are JIS screws, not Phillips. It makes a difference. I can't count the number of times I have beavered those things before I discovered the difference. (Edit: not all JIS screws have the dimple. I don't now why that's so, but when when you find one and mess it up with a Phillips driver before it dawns on you, it can mess up your head.)

https://www.motorcycle.com/ask-mo-anything/difference-between-japanese-jis-phillips.html

Motion Pro sells JIS bits.

Also, hammer driven impact tools are awesome because the hammer drives the bit into the screw as the tool torques the bit to tighten or loosen the screw, which prevents the bit from jumping out of the screw and messing it up. Sometimes they will loosen a JIS screw with a Phillips bit, which is cool if you find yourself without the right JIS bit. 

Hope this helps.

Edited by Old Plonker
afterthought
  • Helpful 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, mad maXR said:

Ok. Thanks for the advice!

You may have noticed the oil pump housing still on the case. I am having a hell of a time getting the screws off! I used an impact screwdriver with no luck,  I may have gone too cheap on the impact, the bits got destroyed. Going to get a torch to see if that helps, may need new screws by the end of it. 😳

4264.jpeg

4268.jpeg

I had the same problem on a xr 100 motor, I sprayed the bolts with pb blaster at night & in the morning for about 3 days, I wasn't in a hurry & figured I'd let the oil penetrate & do it's job & they finally loosened up & came out.  I believe I put a little heat directly on the screw head also. Didn't want to pound too hard & break the case

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Old Plonker said:

Unless my eyes are deceiving me, there are small dimples on each of the screws. If so, they are JIS screws, not Phillips. It makes a difference. I can't count the number of times I have beavered those things before I discovered the difference. (Edit: not all JIS screws have the dimple. I don't now why that's so, but when when you find one and mess it up with a Phillips driver before it dawns on you, it can mess up your head.)

https://www.motorcycle.com/ask-mo-anything/difference-between-japanese-jis-phillips.html

Motion Pro sells JIS bits.

Also, hammer driven impact tools are awesome because the hammer drives the bit into the screw as the tool torques the bit to tighten or loosen the screw, which prevents the bit from jumping out of the screw and messing it up. Sometimes they will loosen a JIS screw with a Phillips bit, which is cool if you find yourself without the right JIS bit. 

Hope this helps.

Damnit, damnit, damnit! 

I knew about JIS and the dimpled screws thru all the videos I've been watching, but also saw many people do it with a torch and impact driver. So I just figured I could avoid buying more specialty tools. Classic case of me costing myself time and money "saving" money in the beginning. Haha. You live, you learn, then you buy JIS I guess

Back to Amazon! 

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, mad maXR said:

Damnit, damnit, damnit! 

I knew about JIS and the dimpled screws thru all the videos I've been watching, but also saw many people do it with a torch and impact driver. So I just figured I could avoid buying more specialty tools. Classic case of me costing myself time and money "saving" money in the beginning. Haha. You live, you learn, then you buy JIS I guess

Back to Amazon! 

Sorry for chuckling maXR, but this is one of those things everybody forgets sometime.

I haven't found my JIS bits since I moved, and that was 14 years ago. But I always get out my trusty old hand-held, hammer-driven impact tool that I bought over 50 years ago and whack away at the JIS screws I come afoul of with a fresh Phillips bit.

Been lucky (mostly). But your experience led me to order a couple of sizes of JIS bits. Why chase the dragon's tail, when the bite is so painful! 

Edit: I should add that although Motion Pro carries JIS bits, they aren't easy to find. If you are looking for them there, go to:

https://www.motionpro.com/product/08-0578

You'll find three sizes on this page. I think the one you need is a #3 (the #1 & #2 are those little buggers on Japanese carbs).

Edited by Old Plonker
  • Helpful 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:


×