Jump to content
Go_outside

MY 2019 Beta RR-S Thread

Recommended Posts

I see there is a 2019 RR/RE thread, but it is pretty dead and didnt include the RR-S.

I have been on the 2018 thread but have encountered some differences in the suspension and fueling that made me want to start this one. 

I bought mine a week ago and took it straight to the local OHV park (carnegie). Its was a blast, but I felt like I needed to set up the suspension a little. 1.5 hours later and the rear knobs were already ramped.

A few days later I went up a nice tight mountain road chasing my old KLR and was again impressed. I went through some fast highway work and noticed pretty quickly that the tires need to be balanced for anything over 50mph. 2hrs later and the rear knobs now had a nice feathered trailing lip. 

I took it to work and it handled the freeway fine, although the tires grabbed the rain grooving and were pretty terrifying coming down a curvy freeway mountain pass.

Fueling is wonderful.

Now for the bad stuff.

It came with a nearly dead battery and a very weak charging system. It wouldnt start 6 hours after I bought it. I found that the ground was bad and it charges now, but it is still weak and will need some more electrical reworking.

It leaks coolant from two places, as did my friends 2018, but in my case tightening the hose clamps only helped not fixed the problem. It is also leaking from the thermostat housing.

It runs hot. At 70 degrees F it will hit 240 in a few minutes of 1st gear rock garden work, which turns on the fan and if I havent turned off the headlight will drain the battery. What will it do in the summer?!

Once it is hot the engine is noisy. Loose sounding, like a top end bearing or piston slap. Im going to bring it back to the dealer for them to check it out.

The headlight is typical candle aimed at the tire enduro stuff. A $40 LED lamp from amazon and some shimming to aim it made it usable.

My rear shock preload had 1/8" of adjustment left and at 185 plus gear and a backpack, call it 205lbs all in, I needed more preload that just wasnt available. I guess a stronger spring is in order.

The front forks were ok in the OHV park, but once I got out into the desert and started through the sloppy rock filled washes I decided it was time to set my sag and dampening. The preload adjuster makes no noticeable change to the super stiff forks. The compression adjustment makes no change. The rebound makes the slightest difference. The fork when moving is ok until the front wheel encounters an obstacle and then the bike looses its line. Standing next to the bike and pumping the forks reveals a stiff, sticky, squeaky fork with at most 2 inches of sag. I wonder if they forgot to add oil to the right leg.

Over all though the bike still rides great. The power is immediate but not snatchy, the power map switch is very subtle and mostly unnecessary. I think the fork is only a problem when the highspeed damping needs to blow off and the rebound dampening need to control the wheel (Iam not a suspension guru). The rest of the time the bike is planted and happy. With the 13Tooth front sprocket I can crawl through the rock gardens and still have enough legs to run 65 happily on the highway at under 6500rpm although first gear does run out a little fast for  beginner power wheelies. Im getting 38-41 mpg at 3-8000 feet elevation. I now have about 25 hours on the bike and the rear tire wear seems to have settled down. I think I might make it another 15 hours! That sounds funny, but after the first 1.5 hours I was expecting 5.

 

I am interested in how the other 2019's are doing.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the 1st report I've seen on a '19 RR-S. Sorry it is not in better shape for you right out of the box, but glad you are enjoying it and isolating your issues.

 It's a shame that the same issues were around in many cases on my '15. Wheels need balancing, rear spring out of adjustment, weak headlight etc. I didn't have any leaks to this day, but many had t-stat issues. 

 Battery and charging issues are not on the normal list, electrical gremlins have been. Keep looking for you problem, the charging system should make plenty of juice.

The noise may be chain slap, I know mine had a lot until I removed a spacer under the front chain guide. The tires lasted forever on mine, but I wasn't on the street at all with them. After some break in hours (10-15) mine loosened up and I went to the 15t sprocket, I'd suggest the 14t for you for now while breaking it in. It will make the power delivery smoother and won't run so hot, and wheelie better! Don't be afraid to try the 15t, this engine will pull it and craves torque rather than revs. 

 I have no comment on the suspension, other than get the proper spring rates and then asses it again. They are supposed to be all new, but with the wrong springs they will once again get a bad rap out of the box I suspect? My older Sachs versions have been better than expected and have never needed revalving, just springs.

 Good luck and keep info coming, it will be worth a bit of teething and setup for what you get in the end, there is nothing else like it.

 

Edited by Johnny Depp
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have seen a bunch of posts regarding bad connections in the harness. There are two major crimp splices in the harness near the head stem, one for the hot and one for the ground that can be a problem. Luckily they are easy to bypass. 

The bike came with the 15t sprocket which was fine, but i am glad i put on the included 13t before getting into some of the technical rocky climbs i found this weekend. 

My feeling is that its a well engineered bike that isnt assembled very well. Two very different people, engineers and assembly line workers. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On the front end make sure, fork isn't binding due to alignment issues with the axle. Won't go through procedure as there are a few ways to do it (it's easy and costs nothing, do a search), but axle needs to be free and not binding or it twists the forks giving the symptoms you are describing. My dealer said they had several that just needed that done and people were then quite happy.

Proper springs are very important, I'm sprung about 50 lbs heavier than Beta charts recommend and really like it (.48 and 5.8) if you get a Racetech  shock spring it's an inch longer than the stock spring and gives more adjustment.

Assembly issues are an issue with all the brands, most bikes should be checked over well before riding much, though it's hard when you have a new bike to ride.

I move my bead lock so it's opposite the tube valve stem on the rim, which helps a lot with the balancing issue. Just have to drill a hole in the rim, and cover the old hole. I use ultra heavy tubes so that could be part of it too.

Good luck with the new bike and keep reporting, would defiantly like to hear more about the forks and if they are easily sorted.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bikes supplied with Li batteries are not fully charged, some new law for 2019. Dealer should have placed it on a charger prior to delivery. At least that's with the Husqvarna/KTM brand,,, they informed the dealers after several 2019 models were sold.

T-stat housing,, unless you ride below 40*F a lot replace with silicone hose. This has been an issues since the first Beta built motors. Well engineered?? line workers?? no Italian quality but once you rework these items you will not have any other problems.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used these ebay spoke weights to balance my wheels. My understanding is no manufacturer balances wheels with rim locks. I suppose it is because they assume you mostly ride in dirt.

Anyway, based upon another riders recommendations, I put 6oz on back wheel and 4 on front across from rim locks. Idid not specifially "balance" them. Runs really smooth on highway now. And obviously, use locktite on the spoke set screws!

 

https://www.ebay.com/itm/14x-Motorcycle-Brass-Wheel-Spoke-Balance-Weights-Refill-Kits-For-KTM-Suzuki-BMW/173457831065?epid=2127583297&hash=item2862e47499:rk:1:pf:0

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It’s brand new so some issues will work out after breaking in the bike. The motor is tighter and will be harder to turn over with estart. The suspension willbreak in and soften again. Got to put heavier spring rate of course. Gotta ride and adjust figuring you may adjust again in a few months. Wheels will always need to be balanced on all brands right? Do any street legal dirtbikes come with balanced wheels? Everyone has to deal with that I think .  The shitty light has been the norm for all street legal dirtbikes. I’m still happy it has a light but have never seen a quality dirtbike from ktm or any brand that had a light that was strong.  I figure that’s just what every must deal with like ktm or husky or whatever. Cooling on all dirbikes are not great. Especially 4 strokes but all of them are not the greatest and break in helps with cooling a bit. Beta having a fan is good but for all my bikes cooling mods are planned to go on right from the start. It’s no big deal if you ride flowing trails but yea for technical improved cooling makes sense. Some drop in evans and figure thats good enough. I don’t buy that strategy alone. To me I’d keep adding cooling mods till the bike runs cool enough for your taste.  The thermostat leaking is something that I’ve seen mentioned here on TT but Ive not had issues with the variety of my betas yet. Just depends I guess. My 09 525 rs never leaked and the thermostat was taken out of the housing. No issues with my 350 or 300’s in the past.  

The beginning is the shakedown cruise for any bike so it’s figuring what’s up. Congratulations on your newbike and thanks for pointing out stuff and doing an early review. For my 09 Beta before and after break in made a huge difference as my Betas rfs motor came very tight new. I couldn’t kick crank the bike over in the beginning and some months later I could kick over and start with one or 2 kicks. In the beginning I had to use the estart to start the bike. The battery would be taxed too much and drained in the beginning. Later after break in there were no problems. It’s stuff like that that you may or may not have. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I checked for fork binding and found none. What I did find was a fork protector that was rubbing on the fork and making it squeak and feel rough. I still cant notice any of the adjustments but since it no longer sounds and feels defective I am going to keep playing with it. 

I find it interesting that in the Beta manual they only give recommendation for static sag and only for the rear. But they do include a comprehensive spring rate chart.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Go_outside said:

I checked for fork binding and found none. What I did find was a fork protector that was rubbing on the fork and making it squeak and feel rough. I still cant notice any of the adjustments but since it no longer sounds and feels defective I am going to keep playing with it. 

I find it interesting that in the Beta manual they only give recommendation for static sag and only for the rear. But they do include a comprehensive spring rate chart.

You need to hit all three measurements as much as possible. Race sag, free sag and preload. There is a lot of info here and over at Betarider.org.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, weantright said:

You need to hit all three measurements as much as possible. Race sag, free sag and preload. There is a lot of info here and over at Betarider.org.

Yes, i usually do. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In regards to the electrical system, I took some measurements today and the bike uses between 3.5 and 5 amps to run (lights and fan on). That translates to 45-65 watts, leaving 135-155 watts of advertised power available for recharging the battery, heated vest, coffee maker etc.

  • Helpful 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I took some measurements yesterday. 
With stock springs and 205lb rider/gear. 
The fork can be adjusted from 29mm static and 47.5mm total sag, to 37mm static and 52mm total sag. There is 15mm of stiction, which seems like alot. 
The manual says for my weight i need heavier fork springs, but the measurements say i need lighter fork springs. 

The rear shock with the preload maxed out gives me 26mm static and 104mm total with 8mm and 0mm stiction respectively. I will go up one spring rate. 

I have 14.5 hrs on the bike, i am not sure how long it should take the fork to break-in. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One more thing, i tried to move the bars forward one hole and found that the Voyager interferes with the handlebar clamp preventing it from moving forward without raising the bars nearly an inch or relocating the gauge. 

I have seen a retail shim stack on another beta but it is just a 23x27mm washer with an 11mm hole in the center. The longer bolt will be harder to find. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
One more thing, i tried to move the bars forward one hole and found that the Voyager interferes with the handlebar clamp preventing it from moving forward without raising the bars nearly an inch or relocating the gauge. 


You just have to bend the mounting bracket forward. Its only sheet metal! You gotta make it fit.
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, surfer-dude said:

 


You just have to bend the mounting bracket forward. Its only sheet metal! You gotta make it fit.

 

I guess I could have at least tried, huh?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Go_outside said:

I guess I could have at least tried, huh?

YEAH THE BIKES A BEAST, YOUR NOT GONNA HURT IT AS FAR AS THATS CONCERNED...

I LIKE MY BARS IN THE FORWARD HOLES, IT HELPS TO POP THE FRONT END UP WHEN THE GOING GETS RUFF, AND I LIKE THE ERGOS BETTER. THIS AND SOME FASTWAY PEGS IN THE LOW & BACK POSITION, MAKES IT FEEL MORE LIKE A JOCKEY POSITION ALONG WITH A LOWER CENTER OF GRAVITY SO I DONT FEEL LIKE IM DEADLIFTING THE FRONTEND AROUND. THIS ALSO MAKES IT EASIER FOR ME TO SUSTAIN THE ATTACK POSITION, SO I CAN RIDE AGGRESSIVE FOR LONGER PERIODS THAN MY BUDS. SHE'S A LITTLE TWITCHIER AT SPEED , BUT IM TALKING 6TH GEAR THRU WHOOPED OUT DESERT SECTIONS. AND NO I DONT RUN A DAMPER. IF I WAS A HARDCORE RACER THAT WAS ALWAYS TRYING TO BE FASTER THAN THE NEXT GUY, I MIGHT CONSIDER ONE. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have noticed my 2017 500 changes engine noise with temperature. It's pretty quiet at engine temps up to about 175 - 180 or so, as it goes towards 200 or over it gets noticeably louder mechanically. When it cools back down it gets quieter. I'm guessing some tolerances are changes as things expand.

I've also noticed on my bike with the 4 gal tank the engine noise I hear also seems to be affected by how much fuel is in the tank, like it's acting as a sound buffer or ???

I have experienced that the sound will be really noisy directly straight up from the engine, ie sitting position, but if I lean over and listen from the side it's 1/2 the level of noise. I have the Hyde skid plate and I don't know if it's a function of acoustic reflection or ???

At this point I've kinda given up worrying about it and tell myself the last KTM 500 I rode was 2x as loud as my Beta.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:


×