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Hit a plateau

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Hey guys, new to this forum not really sure what goes in these. Anyway, I’ve been in a few amateur races in the SoCal area, done some outdoors racing and haven’t been getting any better since. It’s like I hit a plateau I’m not getting any faster or slower. My lap times are the same now as they were earlier this year. Any tips? Advice?

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Usually just B class 450, end up anywhere from 3-8. Sometimes I mess around and hit A class races and end around 7-16. 

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Switch up your training...

Sprinting, Intervals, Different Tracks, Off-Road, Endurance, Skills and Drills, etc can all be incorporated... Doing the same thing over and over will only get you do far... 

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Switch up your training...
Sprinting, Intervals, Different Tracks, Off-Road, Endurance, Skills and Drills, etc can all be incorporated... Doing the same thing over and over will only get you do far... 


^^^^^^ This. And, I'd recommend some professional help. The same fallacy exists in auto racing that "seat time" will magically make you better. You need to be practicing the right things in order to improve. Otherwise, you're just further embedding bad habits.

I'm sure you've got the equivalent to Garrahan Offroad Training around you in Socal. An investment of $175 for a dedicated couple hours with a pro to observe you and give advice can work wonders! Unless your body position is already perfect, just having them diagnose this and help correct it will create a better foundation to work off of.

Full disclosure, I'm going through the same progression myself with riding. I'm an intermediate, not an expert. But I was/am an expert level driver and the concepts of learning, practice, importance of proper technique are all the same.
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Which tracks? Start practicing with faster people. Full Motos for endurance. Dedicate time every practice to specific things. Ride new tracks and places. I’ve never hit a plateau I couldn’t work through, but it did take a while some times.

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1 hour ago, turbo dan said:

What kind of adjustments have you made to the bike?  Stock valving?

turbo dan brings up an important point, as your skills improve usually so does your suspension requirements.

If you are holding back because the bike bottoms too easily or doesn't handle well, you won't push any harder.

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Indeed.  Sometimes you can push harder with better settings.  When you get it right it works like magic.

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I found it becomes something less to think about when riding* (fear of bottoming, front end washouts etc.)

you then get the confidence to push harder and not worry that an ill handling bike will hurt you.

 

*actually, the less you think about that is not directly in front of you, the better it is.

(myself often having suspension adjustments and jetting on my mind but, I'm working on it...)

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What kind of adjustments have you made to the bike?  Stock valving?

Yeah, I just picked up a ‘19 kx450 about a month ago. Came off a 2017 Crf450, only things I’ve done to it so far is a full pro circuit exhaust, and adjusted the suspension front and rear.

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Clickers are good for fine tuning.  New bikes these days are pretty good stock but you may still benefit from revalving.

Its always a good idea to try going up and down on the sag and trying different fork height as well.  Slide them up, slide them down, see what works.

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My advise to you is to start drinking heavily.

All joking aside, I would find a really tough track and ride there for a while. Or make sure to go out when it's muddy or raining. When you get back to easier conditions you will have progressed.

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I haven't seen you ride but chances are that you're not getting enough quality practice each week.  Don't just go to the track and practice what you already know how to do.  To keep improving you need to work on your weak points, set up practice drills that will allow you to work on them over and over and over again and again, until they become your strong points. 

Free riding tips here.

 

Image29.jpg

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