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MotoNW52

Finding the solution to arm pump

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I know there’s a few of you out there that are just like me. I can’t go 1 easy lap without my arms pumping up to the point where I can’t feel my clutch lever or keep the throttle steady. Gonna attach a picture of my hand after doing one lap below. I wanted to kinda document my strategies to get rid of arm pump, or at least lessen it, as well as have your guy’s input and your own tricks posted. IMG_0908.thumb.JPG.e94d9a71b66605492afeb3d69d1d38bf.JPGNote that I am not out of shape, I use every muscle in my arms and legs daily at work and I ride my dirt bike almost every weekend and my bmx bike the days in between.
 
Th first “solution” I am going to try are Steg Pegz on my yz250f. I have them installed and ready to rip this weekend. I’ll post an update when I have one

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Steg pegz was a good idea....except you dont need to spend that money. Grip with your legs. Make it a conscious effort when riding to keep a mental eye on your legs. Pigeon toe yourself just a bit and it happens naturally, going into an "attack" position will make your knees squeeze harder if toes are pointed in slightly

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Steg pegz was a good idea....except you dont need to spend that money. Grip with your legs. Make it a conscious effort when riding to keep a mental eye on your legs. Pigeon toe yourself just a bit and it happens naturally, going into an "attack" position will make your knees squeeze harder if toes are pointed in slightly

I’ve already tried. I’m 6,2 and my knees are above the seat. I can’t get a grip on the bike at all, only a little bit on my right number plate where it bulges for the exhaust, but when I do that I’m leaning back too far.

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Well this was short... the steg pegz work. Took a few laps to get adjusted right and get used to them and in the end I’m no longer pulling off the track after one lap because I can’t feel my clutch lever. Now I’m able to do as many laps as my bad shoulder can take

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Just a little update for anyone wanting to try steg pegz. They didn’t “get rid” of my arm pump but they certainly helped a lot. If my arms do pump up and I start to fall back I can rest my legs against the steg pegz instead of getting whiskey throttle. I cant see myself riding without them

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Pamprin, really. Eat a few (2-3) about 30 minutes prior to riding and it will help significantly.

I’ll give that a shot. I raced arenacross this weekend and the last two laps were brutal, couldn’t hold on for sh*t, wasn’t able to use my steg pegs much in that situation.

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Proper suspension setup, and and don’t let the bike pull on your arms. Weight forward under acceleration generally, unless fighting for traction.

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Proper suspension setup, and and don’t let the bike pull on your arms. Weight forward under acceleration generally, unless fighting for traction.

Gonna send my suspension off to race tech as soon as I can save up the 1000 for it. And yeah I’m still trying to train my body to be in the correct position, given the circumstances. Only been riding track, in a serious manner, for about 2 months now. Been a trail rider my whole life. The more seat time I get the better.
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9 hours ago, MotoNW52 said:


Gonna send my suspension off to race tech as soon as I can save up the 1000 for it. And yeah I’m still trying to train my body to be in the correct position, given the circumstances. Only been riding track, in a serious manner, for about 2 months now. Been a trail rider my whole life. The more seat time I get the better.

I know it’s something that may seem hard to save for, but it really is worth it. I would say #1 besides maintenance.  The bike I bought from a riding buddy had the suspension set up for his weight and riding, using a system where the suspension guy meets you and hooks sensors up to monitor the activity. I believe nobody does that anymore. But, he is very close in weight to me, and riding style and it was like a dream. Il contact the same person and see if he can make adjustments fine tuned for me, if any.

but suspension setup is really worth it.

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Oh arm pump the bain of us all! WATIGE here, I’ a professional coach for all things 2wheeled. The place to start is hydration, nutrition (electrolytes esp!) and proper warm up.
Lets start with the warmup. The purpose of the warmup is to release lactate buffers into your blood stream before you go hard. A pedal bike on a stationary trainer works great for this, it’s easily portable and very effective. You can use this prior to your ride/race to warmup your muscles, dilate your blood vessels and get your heart and blood moving.
Next lets look at hydration, this is a very neglected aspect of both training and racing! You should strive to always produce ONLY clear urine. This is the biggest easiest way to monitor your hydration levels. For my athletes they have water with them at all times, take in a minimum of 3 liters of water a day and are trained to drink every 2 minutes. This makes sure of proper hydration and trains them to drink and often!
Lastly nutrition. Couple aspects here, electrolytes are usually fairly depleted for many athletes so adding a electrolyte supplement is recommended this can just be added to the water. However you will also have to address your glycogen stores. All our brains care about is glucose (glycogen) as we deplete these reserves the brain starts shutting things down and constricting both muscles and vascular systems. Never allowing this to happen is the goal. G2 or regular Gatorade is an excellent choice for addressing this along with an aspirin prior to the warmup and if you race with a hydration pack adding both to your water is a good call.
The other ideas are also valid but this is the foundation that you build on.
Good training and keep the rubber side down!
Charlie Johnson Biomechanist

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"Arm pump" is caused by clenching your hands on an object. In this case, it's your grips. Here's what's happening~

Your grips may be old and dried up rubber. This causes them to be slick. Or

Your gloves are old and dried out. Moist gloves are so much more "tacky" than dried out ones. Or

You are trying to quell the vibration from your grips via squeezing extra hard. To remedy this, you might want to look into adding weight inside the bar ends, as this seems to work. 

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In addition to all the comments posted here, I have found this device to be helpful for riders.  Since very few people can afford to bring a massage therapist to the track, I have found this device to be beneficial to stimulate the tissue (like a massage) which opens up the tissue and allows it to be more pliable.  

Google for the best price and availability.  Keep me posted on your results.

Yours in sport and health,

-Coach Robb 

 

 

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