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bmicha7

2017 250rr suspension

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Alright guys so I've got a little over 20 hours on the bike, and I want to change the oil in the forks. This will be my first time ever messing with forks. I've read through a port on here and have looked at the online manual for how to do it. I think for a fork oil change I would just want to unscrew the top cap from the fork body and then the top cap from the cartridge? Doing it that way, how would I determine how much fork oil to put back in?

Edited by bmicha7

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11 hours ago, bmicha7 said:

Alright guys so I've got a little over 20 hours on the bike, and I want to change the oil in the forks. This will be my first time ever messing with forks. I've read through a port on here and have looked at the online manual for how to do it. I think for a fork oil change I would just want to unscrew the top cap from the fork body and then the top cap from the cartridge? Doing it that way, how would I determine how much fork oil to put back in?

Should clean the valve stack and check for any shim issues.

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17 hours ago, bmicha7 said:

Alright guys so I've got a little over 20 hours on the bike, and I want to change the oil in the forks. This will be my first time ever messing with forks. I've read through a port on here and have looked at the online manual for how to do it. I think for a fork oil change I would just want to unscrew the top cap from the fork body and then the top cap from the cartridge? Doing it that way, how would I determine how much fork oil to put back in?

You can read all you can and watch videos and have the correct tools and have the parts needed and go for it.. or take it to a tuner or send away and service alone or upgrade with springs for your weight and maybe valved etc. You know the answers before you start I think. If you want to do your own work go for it. Just be prepared as best you can and take your time and be methodical and keep everything clean and orderly to have a lesser chance of screwing up putting it back together. Learn and enjoy or have someone else do it who does it all the time and is very experienced and knowledgeable. For me I have a guy who has done my suspension on a variety of bikes for years and all my Betas. It’s easier and my suspension is done right and great. I could do it myself too but for me I’m way happier just riding and adjusting clickers. If you like playing with suspension and learning how to tune then that’s cool. Knock yourself out and enjoy the process learning.

:ride:

Edited by hawaiidirtrider

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Oil changes are easy if you have all the correct tools and watch a few videos. I have found out that all 5 weight oils don't seem to work the same, I've used Maxima light, for years and had to use Amsoil last time, I could tell the differance, pick a brand and stick to it. 

And besides the correct tools, Maxima suspension cleaner is glorious, two cans of that stuff makes cleaning all the parts a breeze.              

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32 minutes ago, ktm300 said:

Oil changes are easy if you have all the correct tools and watch a few videos. I have found out that all 5 weight oils don't seem to work the same, I've used Maxima light, for years and had to use Amsoil last time, I could tell the differance, pick a brand and stick to it. 

And besides the correct tools, Maxima suspension cleaner is glorious, two cans of that stuff makes cleaning all the parts a breeze.              

This will show you why different brands feel different despite same weight rating.

http://www.peterverdone.com/suspension-fluids/

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Oil changes are easy if you have all the correct tools and watch a few videos. I have found out that all 5 weight oils don't seem to work the same, I've used Maxima light, for years and had to use Amsoil last time, I could tell the differance, pick a brand and stick to it. 
And besides the correct tools, Maxima suspension cleaner is glorious, two cans of that stuff makes cleaning all the parts a breeze.              
2 cans for one service??? Woah.

1 can lasts me 2 services at least. Lol
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I think I've decided to skip changing the oil myself and I'm gonna let Total Control Suspension revalve my forks and shock and respring them as well since I'm a bit out of the weight range.

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I  go through a can and a half with every service, you use allot just cleaning the springs. 
Dude... Talk about a waste. Lol

Do you use a hose to clean your floor? Or do you just use a wet mop?

For the springs I just spray the cleaner on a shop towel, then hold the spring with the wet shop towel in one hand, and turn the spring with the other. By the end of the spring the rag comes away clean.

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I use basic cheap brake cleaner for the hard(all metallic) parts like springs and tubes.  The more expensive suspension cleaner is reserved for the assemblies that include orings and plastic, with which it is compatible..

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38 minutes ago, GP said:

I use basic cheap brake cleaner for the hard(all metallic) parts like springs and tubes.  The more expensive suspension cleaner is reserved for the assemblies that include orings and plastic, with which it is compatible..

+1 but the brake cleaner I use its not exactly cheap (but still a bit cheaper than the suspension cleaner). I tried a cheap brake cleaner (same quantity - half liter)) and I barely cleaned one fork with it. Normally it lasts for two....

 

I also use it for cleaning the springs. I spray a little from a distance and then I use paper form the inside of the coils, not just wiping the outside.

I also use a 'paper ball' for the tubes (upper and lower). Many pieces of paper together so it is tight when inserted on the tube. Then I push it with a long small dia tube. Especially the lowers of a CC fork are very hard to clean as all the debris is found around the bottoming tube.

Edited by dirtbird

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44 minutes ago, dirtbird said:

+1 but the brake cleaner I use its not exactly cheap (but still a bit cheaper than the suspension cleaner). I tried a cheap brake cleaner (same quantity - half liter)) and I barely cleaned one fork with it. Normally it lasts for two....

 

I also use it for cleaning the springs. I spray a little from a distance and then I use paper form the inside of the coils, not just wiping the outside.

I also use a 'paper ball' for the tubes (upper and lower). Many pieces of paper together so it is tight when inserted on the tube. Then I push it with a long small dia tube. Especially the lowers of a CC fork are very hard to clean as all the debris is found around the bottoming tube.

Here in the USA, at the local auto parts store or Walmart, generic brake cleaner is a lot cheaper than suspension cleaner at the MC dealer, and seems to have a higher propellant pressure so it cleans the inside of the steel lowers well.  I believe the suspension cleaner is mostly acetone with a propellant.  Acetone is also cheap and good for non-spray parts cleaning.  For springs I also thread a rag through a coil at the end and just twist the spring winding the rag down, wipes the entire wire inside and out.  I have a big shop rag can in my garage, plenty of rags.  Brake cleaner sprayed down the tubes followed by a cleaner soaked rag ball pushed with a piece of PEX tubing (plastic plumbing here in USA) so no scratches.  Same for steel lower tubes.  

Edited by GP

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2 minutes ago, GP said:

Here in the USA, at the local auto parts store or Walmart, generic brake cleaner is a lot cheaper than suspension cleaner at the MC dealer, and seems to have a higher propellant pressure so it cleans the insie of the steel lowers well.  I believe the suspension cleaner is mostly acetone with a propellant.  Acetone is also cheap and good for non-spray parts cleaning.  For springs I also thread a rag through a coil at the end and just twist the spring winding the rag down, wipes the entire wire inside and out.  I have a big shop rag can in my garage, plenty of rags.  Brake cleaner sprayed down the tubes followed by a cleaner soaked rag ball pushed with a piece of PEX tubing (plastic plumbing here in USA) so no scratches.  Same for steel lower tubes.  

Yes I should use a plastic plumbing tool but I never made it to the hardware store and remembered about it...the tube I use its coming from an old Ikea lamp and as it is metal, I am extra careful especially with the uppers. But I use it mostly to push the paper out.

I use (but in short bursts) the MAXIMA susp. cleaner. Do you remember cleansing kits we were using for vinyl records? Its smell is quite similar.

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I agree with GP, definitely don't use brake cleaner on rubber or plastic parts. It doesn't matter if you wipe it off "quickly" the chemical reaction has already taken place, and repeated exposure will damage those parts. I would rather people use dish soap and warm water if they want some more aggressive than suspension cleaner. You have to dry it off to remove excess water, but a quick dip in suspension fluid will displace 99% of any residual water.

Otherwise just stick to suspension cleaner on plastic/rubber/composite parts and brake cleaner on all other metal surfaces. Also I wouldn't use brake cleaner on painted surfaces either......just don't.

Either way brake cleaner is nasty stuff and I see people use it without thinking. You don't want it on your skin, you don't want to breathe it, and you CERTAINLY don't want to ingest it or get it in your eyes.

Where gloves and safety glasses in a well ventilated area. This stuff is serious.

https://envirofluid.com/articles/brake-cleaner-non-chlorinated-vs-chlorinated-how-to-choose-between-deadly-deadlier/

Just a quick read. Thanks

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https://shop.advanceautoparts.com/p/wearever-brake-parts-cleaner-w7340/7040598-p?c3ch=PLA&c3nid=7040598-P&adtype=pla&gclid=Cj0KCQiArqPgBRCRARIsAPwlHoXv-Nz-NZOaQTN1ZhnWhq3ZZeNfg_5iryjBc6fRy1LVNxH128XIhSUaAnr5EALw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds

Try this, cheap and will not harm rubber,plastic,paint.  Its more less rubbing alcohol, been using it for years with zero problems!

Same formula is also available thru zep. Used to also get it thru misty products and next dimension but not sure if either of them are still areound

Make sure its the w7340, they do make another version and its pretty nasty stuff that will eat paint and probably rubber.

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