Jump to content
Jace Perez

Suspension for MX and Hare Scrambles

Recommended Posts

Hey my new to me yz250 was previously sprung for a 190lbs rider and I am 140lbs so I have to get it resprung. I ride 60% mx and 40% messing around and trail riding and some hare scrambles here and then. What do you think I should do just go to stock valves with lighter springs and just use clickers and change sag for racing hare scrambles and going to the mx track?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Get one fork leg setup for mx and one fork leg setup for harescrambles, that’s why there’s two legs so you can do both lol.

 

Talk it over with a suspension guru  and they’ll setup your suspension right. Won’t be cheap though, but it will be worth it.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Depending on your motocross skill level, an off-road oriented setup would likely be too soft for MX.

 

Better to live with stiffer than ideal trail settings, decent faster paced woods / HS setup

than constantly bottoming out and risk injury on MX track type landings.

Edited by mlatour
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Depending on your motocross skill level, an off-road oriented setup would likely be too soft for MX.
 
Better to live with stiffer than ideal trail settings, decent high speed wood / HS setup
than constantly bottoming out and risk injury on MX track type landings.


Same thing I was thinking. I’m gonna get it set up for mx and when riding trails just soften up the clickers and maybe slow rebound in the rear and speed up rebound in the front to compensate for the multiple roots to keep the fork in the stroke

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rebound should be the same for MX or trails.

Rebound all depends on the type of track. In super rocky trails you increase rebound speed so that the fork can be at the top part of the stroke for the next rock

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Jace Perez said:


Rebound all depends on the type of track. In super rocky trails you increase rebound speed so that the fork can be at the top part of the stroke for the next rock

And you don't need the same behavior in sand or groom track? The difference is you can ride to a certain level / speed with too much rebound damping in sand or groom track but you can't in rocky trail. I see a lot of bike at the track with too much rebound damping. They turn better but get busy on rough braking zone at the end of the day. To slow down the rebound and turn faster you can use the front brake and keep the forks moving in bumps. Rebound is linked to sprung/unsprung weight and spring rate, that doesn't change much from track to track (except if mud is involved).

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/8/2018 at 12:18 AM, texasthierry said:

Rebound should be the same for MX or trails.

Agreed. As I see it, rebound is tied to spring rate etc. first, then speed, then terrain. Not all MX tracks are smooth, and a lot of 'em develop small chop, which has similar requirements to roots and rocks. Mud? Too busy trying to keep it pointed the right direction to worry about suspension :D

I do mostly MX, but do a couple of trail rides every year. I leave the suspension alone, a little bit of firmness on little stuff is better than being too light on those big surprises you get occasionally. :eek:

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:


×