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How often do you change your clutch and brake fluids?

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I'm having my dealer change out my OEM plastic oil pump gears for the steel ones in my '16 390RR (I'm not confident in my own ability to do this). I'm also going to have them check the valves and while they're at it I was thinking of having them change my clutch and brake fluids.  Bike has just over 3,000 miles and 112 hours.  I don't race it, but figured this might be good to do as general maintenance.

How often should this typically be done? 

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I've been doing mine once a year, in the spring.  

 

I also had my dealer swap out the oil gears as the bike was in under warranty for the kickstarter return spring that had acted up.  I'm glad I had them do it as I didn't feel like doing it  myself.  

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I'm having my dealer change out my OEM plastic oil pump gears for the steel ones in my '16 390RR (I'm not confident in my own ability to do this). I'm also going to have them check the valves and while they're at it I was thinking of having them change my clutch and brake fluids.  Bike has just over 3,000 miles and 112 hours.  I don't race it, but figured this might be good to do as general maintenance.
How often should this typically be done? 
Why are you changing your oil pump gears? I just had mine looked at because I had a rekluse installed and they looked brand new. I had 114 hours and 2800 miles. My mechanic said my clutch fluid was really dirty when he changed it. received_723098808090328.jpegreceived_2237416179875138.jpeg

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4 minutes ago, ADVLite said:

Why are you changing your oil pump gears? I just had mine looked at because I had a rekluse installed and they looked brand new. I had 114 hours and 2800 miles. My mechanic said my clutch fluid was really dirty when he changed it. received_723098808090328.jpegreceived_2237416179875138.jpeg

Why?  Because the general rule of thumb around here has been to change the plastic OEM gears at 100 hours.  I know there's some debate as to whether this is absolutely necessary or not, but I'd rather pay a few hundred bucks to have the steel ones put in than take a gamble and have them fail some point down the road and have a dead bike.  I just want to take care of it now and not have to worry about it later. 

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Why?  Because the general rule of thumb around here has been to change the plastic OEM gears at 100 hours.  I know there's some debate as to whether this is absolutely necessary or not, but I'd rather pay a few hundred bucks to have the steel ones put in than take a gamble and have them fail some point down the road and have a dead bike.  I just want to take care of it now and not have to worry about it later. 
To each their own. If you're not missing any teeth or noticing any cracking you're probably fine. It was the old 3 gear design that had issues anyway. Almost all manufacturers have composite oil pump gears and they dont recommend changing...just some food for thought. Change your fluids for sure though.

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The plastic gears do have a time/mileage interval for changing them.  Many, like me, are changing them out with the steel gears as no one wants to take chances with what could happen if/when they go. 

It is also very interesting that Beta now has the steel gears available through BYOB.  

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The plastic gears do have a time/mileage interval for changing them.  Many, like me, are changing them out with the steel gears as no one wants to take chances with what could happen if/when they go. 
It is also very interesting that Beta now has the steel gears available through BYOB.  
Yes - I'm not worried. I have friends with 300+ hours on OG gears. No issues.

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I cracked open my reservoir to check my clutch fluid and It has all separated! Clear oil on top and blackish oil on the bottom. This is good info for me.  I will take a pic tonight. 

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2 hours ago, Ocaptainmycaptain said:

Bike has just over 3,000 miles and 112 hours

Funny, we all ride so different. I have about the same hours with only 1100 miles on my '17 390! Almost all woods ridng in 2nd-3rd for life of the bike. 

Clutch fluid, especially on a 4-stroke, should be changed on a regular basis. I change mine quarterly unless I'm not ridng much like over the winter. It takes about 5-10 minutes start to finish. 

I agree with ADV, the plastic oil pump gears were blown up from 1 post several years ago. Virtually all bikes in this class run plastic gears and it's not a rampant problem. I'll wait to check mine at 150 hours. Plenty of these bikes now have 200+ hrs with no valve check or oil pump gears changed with no issues. They're proving to be extremely durable engines. 

Nothing wrong with being cautious though and prevention goes along way in keeping your bike in top working condition and longevity. 

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Funny, we all ride so different. I have about the same hours with only 1100 miles on my '17 390! Almost all woods ridng in 2nd-3rd for life of the bike. 
Clutch fluid, especially on a 4-stroke, should be changed on a regular basis. I change mine quarterly unless I'm not ridng much like over the winter. It takes about 5-10 minutes start to finish. 
I agree with ADV, the plastic oil pump gears were blown up from 1 post several years ago. Virtually all bikes in this class run plastic gears and it's not a rampant problem. I'll wait to check mine at 150 hours. Plenty of these bikes now have 200+ hrs with no valve check or oil pump gears changed with no issues. They're proving to be extremely durable engines. 
Nothing wrong with being cautious though and prevention goes along way in keeping your bike in top working condition and longevity. 
Yup...still haven't checked my valves at 115 hours

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3 minutes ago, ADVLite said:
5 minutes ago, firffighter said:
Funny, we all ride so different. I have about the same hours with only 1100 miles on my '17 390! Almost all woods ridng in 2nd-3rd for life of the bike. 
Clutch fluid, especially on a 4-stroke, should be changed on a regular basis. I change mine quarterly unless I'm not ridng much like over the winter. It takes about 5-10 minutes start to finish. 
I agree with ADV, the plastic oil pump gears were blown up from 1 post several years ago. Virtually all bikes in this class run plastic gears and it's not a rampant problem. I'll wait to check mine at 150 hours. Plenty of these bikes now have 200+ hrs with no valve check or oil pump gears changed with no issues. They're proving to be extremely durable engines. 
Nothing wrong with being cautious though and prevention goes along way in keeping your bike in top working condition and longevity. 

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Yup...still haven't checked my valves at 115 hours

Me either. I was ready to do them at 100 hrs. My dealer has over 6k on his 430rr. He's ridden 6 Rip to Cabo's (brutally tough event) and races A class in our XC and Harescramble series. He told me not to even worry about valves or checking oil pump gears until at least 150+ hrs. He's just not seeing any issues with these motors as they come in for service. A couple over 300 hrs with nothing but oil changes and clean airfilter. 

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Add me to the list, with a 500 RR-S, with 3,300 miles and some 185 hours who has rolled the dice who has NOT had the valves checked since getting the bike new on 02/22/2017.  

The bike starts like it always does and also runs like it always has so I just leave it all alone.  

Edited by Ben500RR-S
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For Autos- they generally recommend every 2 years.

 On the dirt bikes, I change ever six months or so, since I ride in the rain a lot.   Brake fluid ‘likes’ water and will absorb moisture.  Flushing it solves this issues, which can cause corrosion and loss of braking power if the brakes get really hot.  It is cheap and easy.

Edited by lotus54

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"How often do you change your clutch and brake fluids?" 

As soon as my clutch or brakes stop working! 

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Once a year. Why?

Break flud absorbes water. noch much, but it does. With that there develop some crystallic some crystals, which remain in the brake fluid. They don t really damage most of the stuff, as the brake pumps and calipers are mostly anodiced. But as I use unanodized pumps, I must do.

And important is to change the fluid, before you stand the bike into garage for winter. Or at least after winter, before you test - use the pump.

The crystals destroy the inner surface of the pump.

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Half way through last summer the brakes on my 500exc started to feel like shit. I thoroughly cleaned the rotors/pads then scuffed them up and it got slightly better. Then I did a full bleed front and rear and they felt brand new again. I must of put 4oz of fluid through each until it was 100% clean and was amazed with the results!

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9 hours ago, ADVLite said:
9 hours ago, Ocaptainmycaptain said:



Why?  Because the general rule of thumb around here has been to change the plastic OEM gears at 100 hours.  I know there's some debate as to whether this is absolutely necessary or not, but I'd rather pay a few hundred bucks to have the steel ones put in than take a gamble and have them fail some point down the road and have a dead bike.  I just want to take care of it now and not have to worry about it later. 

Read more  

To each their own. If you're not missing any teeth or noticing any cracking you're probably fine. It was the old 3 gear design that had issues anyway. Almost all manufacturers have composite oil pump gears and they dont recommend changing...just some food for thought. Change your fluids for sure though.

I would at a minimum remove it and look at the ID and drive interface.  And check the play.  The method in which they failed on the KTM XC4 you wouldn't have seen just from looking at it while installed (link to see what they look like).  I don't know if Beta is seeing the same failure mode but it may be worth checking.

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I meant to post this here, but this is what my clutch fluid looks like. I'm guessing the previous owner did not change it. I have only put about 50 hours on the bike. 20181218_163604.thumb.jpg.4203445511d606f5c1f2c8f4a103e086.jpg

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change brake and clutch fluids once a year ( middle of winter , I live in snow country ) also check  and lube all rear linkage bearings and bushings , wheel bearings, steering head bearings , brake caliper slide pins . all lever pivots, cables , everything that slides-rotates-pivots. engine oil and air filters as needed . when I change a tire I squirt some wd-40 on the spoke nipple ends and give  em a turn , no seized spokes. i ride a lot . and in a lot of wet. my bikes always run and feel new . never break down during riding season.

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The used dual bikes I have bought; no one had changed the brake fluid on these bike since new.  These bike were between 4 to 7 years old.  I changed the brake fluid.  The fluid was dark but not as bad as I expected.  I ride in a high desert area, so moisture is generally not a problem.  The change did improve the performance.

 

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