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Question about hitch carriers...

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I have a hitch carrier that I have used on occasion with a class IV hitch on my truck with no problems, but I usually just put the bike in the bed.  I've been thinking about selling the truck and going with an SUV, so I would have to use a hitch carrier all the time.  Just looking at SUVs however, it seems that most have a receiver hitch that has a much smaller opening than a regular class IV hitch.  Is there an adapter, or do I have to buy a carrier designed to fit whatever size the SUV hitches are?

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New carrier, or new hitch.  We bought a Subaru about a year ago, and I had a standard 2" reciever type hitch installed.  It was about 400 bucks, and worth it...

 

I have a buddy that had that issue, and fabbed his own adaptor.  He's an excellent welder/fabricator, with the tools and knowledge it can be adapted.  For me, I wasn't too comfortable with my bike on that little reciever, although I'm sure it would have been fine.

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You can buy adapters, but remember, the reason the hitch has a smaller receiver is that it is a lighter duty hitch.  Keep that in mind when you are bouncing down a dirt access road.

Most manufacturers have trailer towing guide, which will give you an idea of tow and hitch weights.  Remember that these are for a trailer that is supported by at least one axle.  The hitch carrier has no such support.

Here is the link to the Ford guides from 2003 to 2019:

https://www.fleet.ford.com/towing-guides/

Edited by todd727
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tongue weight rating isnt applicable with regard to hitch haulers because the weight is cantilevered out an additional 24 inches. 

think of it like using a cheater bar on a wrench.

a correct approach would be to calculate additional torque applied to the rear axle, put on by the loaded hitch hauler, and then compare that to what  max rated tongue weight does to rear axle torque.

hitch haulers are an atypical vehicular use that the automakers do not have guidelines for. 

 

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2 hours ago, BlackBuzzard said:

tongue weight rating isnt applicable with regard to hitch haulers because the weight is cantilevered out an additional 24 inches. 

think of it like using a cheater bar on a wrench.

a correct approach would be to calculate additional torque applied to the rear axle, put on by the loaded hitch hauler, and then compare that to what  max rated tongue weight does to rear axle torque.

hitch haulers are an atypical vehicular use that the automakers do not have guidelines for. 

 

Very correct, glad you understood...

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4 hours ago, RichBaker said:

Very correct, glad you understood...

 

6 hours ago, BlackBuzzard said:

tongue weight rating isnt applicable with regard to hitch haulers because the weight is cantilevered out an additional 24 inches. 

think of it like using a cheater bar on a wrench.

a correct approach would be to calculate additional torque applied to the rear axle, put on by the loaded hitch hauler, and then compare that to what  max rated tongue weight does to rear axle torque.

hitch haulers are an atypical vehicular use that the automakers do not have guidelines for. 

 

 

4 hours ago, RichBaker said:

Very correct, glad you understood...

Agree with both of you on this, just was in a hurry.  No way I would hang a bike off a 1.5" receiver.

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Purchased this a short while back. It's a Geny Torsion hitch. My truck has a 2.5" class 5. I really don't haul super heavy at the moment but we have Horses in the near future. This hitch is extremely well made. All American steel. It will do everything even take a pintle. So far I've loaded up a tandem dump trailer and the bed. I'm guessing all in it was about 8k. Hitch worked like a dream down rutted roads. It was pricey but I believe do it once and be done with it. Cheers.20181219_141011.jpeg20181221_142455.jpeg

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On 12/22/2018 at 6:39 AM, poldies4 said:

New carrier, or new hitch.  We bought a Subaru about a year ago, and I had a standard 2" reciever type hitch installed.  It was about 400 bucks, and worth it...

 

I have a buddy that had that issue, and fabbed his own adaptor.  He's an excellent welder/fabricator, with the tools and knowledge it can be adapted.  For me, I wasn't too comfortable with my bike on that little reciever, although I'm sure it would have been fine.

Poldies4 - can you PM me? I've got a question for you, and was unsuccessful PMing.

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A couple of tips about hitch carriers.  To prevent the rocking back and forth, run a bead of weld on the top and one side of the insert, then grind down so it fits snugly into the receiver.  

Also, if your bike blocks the view of your tail lights, that can be a problem.  I've got a set of lights mounted on magnets (from Harbor Freight) with long electrical wires that plug into your trailer electrical connection that I used to use when towing vehicles.  If your carrier is steel, you can stick them to it.  Or to the roof of your vehicle.

I've used a hitch carrier for years, and thousands of miles with no problems.  LOL, except when turning too short when pulling my camper.  

That is another tip.  I mounted my carrier on a hitch extender from Harbor Freight so I could also pull my camper.  But be careful about hitch weight if you do that.  The extension for the bike multiplies the weight.  My Jeep Cherokee has a 750# limit, and with the bike and camper it is about at it's max.

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On 1/12/2019 at 12:25 PM, Weezer the Geezer said:

A couple of tips about hitch carriers.  To prevent the rocking back and forth, run a bead of weld on the top and one side of the insert, then grind down so it fits snugly into the receiver.  

 

Interesting idea, thanks for that..!

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On 1/12/2019 at 3:25 PM, Weezer the Geezer said:

A couple of tips about hitch carriers.  To prevent the rocking back and forth, run a bead of weld on the top and one side of the insert, then grind down so it fits snugly into the receiver.  

Also, if your bike blocks the view of your tail lights, that can be a problem.  I've got a set of lights mounted on magnets (from Harbor Freight) with long electrical wires that plug into your trailer electrical connection that I used to use when towing vehicles.  If your carrier is steel, you can stick them to it.  Or to the roof of your vehicle.

I've used a hitch carrier for years, and thousands of miles with no problems.  LOL, except when turning too short when pulling my camper.  

That is another tip.  I mounted my carrier on a hitch extender from Harbor Freight so I could also pull my camper.  But be careful about hitch weight if you do that.  The extension for the bike multiplies the weight.  My Jeep Cherokee has a 750# limit, and with the bike and camper it is about at it's max.

On the carrier I have, the pin is actually a bolt with a steel tube welded over  2/3rds of the thread. The stinger on the hitch receiver does not have the same sized holes on both sides (one side doesn't allow the tube to go through), so when you push the pin through, only the threads stick through the the other side. Then, when you tighten the outer nut, the steel tube is getting sucked up against the inside of the stinger tube, taking up all the slack. Simple, but ingenious.

bolt.jpg

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