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Tubliss gen 2 for the XRs

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Hello you crazy for the red!

Have you used Tubliss to make your tires tubless? I was going tonuse this kit for my old crf250... I sold it before the install, wondering how this works on the 650... What makes me think about it is the part that say "off road use only" as i use my bike for 50/50... I wanted to use it with my new tire, but wanted to ask for some experiense here...

The new tire is a motoz hybrid tire 🤗

Looking forward for your input!

 

🍻🍻🍻

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I've never used them but there is a member on another forum that has used them on the road for quite a while with no issues. 

That "offroad use only" disclaimer is on most all aftermarket parts because they don't want to spend the money to certify them to meet transportation standards (usually in the US or EU).

Edited by Hollerhead
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I have them on some offroad bikes I have and they work fine for them but I don't on my XR.

They always leak air slowly even with slime.  You always have to check air pressure before you go out.

On my XR I use heavy duty tubes.

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Most Tubliss users report less air leakage with Tubliss than with tubes.  My Tubliss front and rear leak less air than when I was using tubes.  The tires remain almost completely inflated for weeks.  Of course you should always check air pressure before you go out with any tire setup.

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I have them on my XR650L.. work just like on any other bike.  Mine hold air fine for a few weeks, the HP bladder will get low however I check every day anyway.  Make sure you carry a hand pump capable of 110PSI or so, they're fairly easy to come by in the bicycle world.. just in case you need to top up your HP bladder...

My riding buddies freak out when I can tractor up hills with ease... low pressure off road can make a massive difference in traction.  I think that if you tend to 'blast' all obstacles are high speed.. probably less useful.

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As per Jeff at Nuetech when I asked about the "off-road use only": "...they are not DOT approved so we simply can only recommend for off-road use."

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Tubes are not DOT approved, AFAIK (and I have contacted DOT in the past) there are no standards for tubes only tires.  Check your tubes for 'DOT Approved', never seen it myself...

Nuetech is covering their backside, understandably.  There are a lot of people who have put in 1000's of highway miles on big ADV bikes without issue.   A bigger issue IMO is balancing, I had to use a ton of weights on my XRL to balance the rimlock/valve affair...  worth it though, smooth as butter up to about 75/80 or so (where my gearing runs out of RPM's 😉

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5 hours ago, Chas_M said:

Most Tubliss users report less air leakage with Tubliss than with tubes.  My Tubliss front and rear leak less air than when I was using tubes.  The tires remain almost completely inflated for weeks.  Of course you should always check air pressure before you go out with any tire setup.

It must be me then.

I have Tubliss on 4 bikes and the tires all go flat in a couple of days.

The bladders don't leak but the tires do.

They do give great traction and no flats so I live with them losing air.

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I think most people that have problems with the LP side holding air may not have used enough soapy water..  When it evaporates (where does it go?  not clue here, but my tires aren't sloshing) it sorta 'glues' the tire/HP bladder together. 

I had a rear that was leaking about 5psi a week.  I took the wheel off, aired both sides down and removed the cores.  I then broke the bead and squirted in a bunch of soapy water (per instruction step after mounting the tire).  Bounced/rotated wheel (again per instructions) and aired back up.  That tire didn't give me any further trouble..

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Been riding tubeless on mountain bikes for a decade.  The only reason that it leaks air is:  dirt bike tires are made for tubes.  The sidewalls are porous. Different from a “tubeless” tire.  So, when the bike sits, the fluid (usually some sort of liquid latex with filler) falls to the bottom, leaving the top portion of the tire “dry”. That’s where the air escapes.   Seating the bead is also critical with tubeless systems.  

Aren’t there tubeless MX tires ?

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4 hours ago, braindead0 said:

Tubes are not DOT approved, AFAIK (and I have contacted DOT in the past) there are no standards for tubes only tires.  Check your tubes for 'DOT Approved', never seen it myself...

Nuetech is covering their backside, understandably.  There are a lot of people who have put in 1000's of highway miles on big ADV bikes without issue.   A bigger issue IMO is balancing, I had to use a ton of weights on my XRL to balance the rimlock/valve affair...  worth it though, smooth as butter up to about 75/80 or so (where my gearing runs out of RPM's 😉

None of this applies to the OP because he's in Guatemala but...

I think TUbliss is not just covering the backside they're helping the consumer cover theirs and be as safe as possible when on the street.  It's a complicated subject. 

Tires meet either tubeless or tube type DOT requirements.  They are also only DOT legal when used on a DOT approved rim that they have proven they work with and have listed on document available to the consumer.  Tube type tires can't be operated on roads (legally speaking) in the US without a tube in them.  Not many DOT knobbies (maybe none) are tubeless because not many spoke wheels are tubeless (maybe none for offroad bikes).  Because of the more complex inner liner and bead design, as well as testing and such to prove they meet standards there's no practical business reason to build a tubeless DOT knobby. 

TUbliss was not designed for a tubeless tires and rims.  There's just no reason for them to get all technical and say "can technically be used on the highway if fitted inside an approved tubeless tire and wheel assembly" because they know that assembly doesn't exist on a dirt bike.

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All of the modern Trials bike use tubeless rims on the rear; some with spokes and a seal ring over the spokes, and DID with a flange for the spokes. The rim also has a bead that keeps the tire in place with no slip so a rim lock is not needed even at very low pressures. Notice how long the tire contact patch is, the tire is probably at 3.5psi.

 

9 hours ago, Chas_M said:

Most Tubliss users report less air leakage with Tubliss than with tubes.  My Tubliss front and rear leak less air than when I was using tubes.  The tires remain almost completely inflated for weeks.  Of course you should always check air pressure before you go out with any tire setup.

I've used Tubliss systems on several bikes since about 2009 or 2010 and some don't leak at all over six months and some lose enough in a week to need air. Applies to both the tires and the Tubliss tube. Most common  is the seal between the Tubliss inner tire and the inside of the tire bead, and the tire casing, slime can help those seals.  Also if the tire is a tube type) most common on dirt bikes) the tire casings can, and do, leak air. I paint the inside of my tube type tires with slime to help seal the casing. Tire casings also begin to leak air from too many miles at too low a pressure, I destroyed a Michelin S12 by too many miles at zero psi, and a tubeless Trials tire with too many years at 4psi.  Also low tire pressure on road can be dangerous so street riding requires more pressure than off road. My Trials bike runs a radial ply tubeless tire and after almost ten years it still hold pressure.

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7 minutes ago, Chuck. said:

All of the modern Trials bike use tubeless rims on the rear; some with spokes and a seal ring over the spokes, and DID with a flange for the spokes. The rim also has a bead that keeps the tire in place with no slip so a rim lock is not needed even at very low pressures. Notice how long the tire contact patch is, the tire is probably at 3.5psi.

 

I've used Tubliss systems on several bikes since about 2009 or 2010 and some don't leak at all over six months and some lose enough in a week to need air. Applies to both the tires and the Tubliss tube. Most common  is the seal between the Tubliss inner tire and the inside of the tire bead, and the tire casing, slime can help those seals.  Also if the tire is a tube type) most common on dirt bikes) the tire casings can, and do, leak air. I paint the inside of my tube type tires with slime to help seal the casing. Tire casings also begin to leak air from too many miles at too low a pressure, I destroyed a Michelin S12 by too many miles at zero psi, and a tubeless Trials tire with too many years at 4psi.  Also low tire pressure on road can be dangerous so street riding requires more pressure than off road. My Trials bike runs a radial ply tubeless tire and after almost ten years it still hold pressure.

And the kickstand is on the wrong side...😁

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I have run the Tubliss system on the front and rear on my 500 EXC for about 4 years.  On occasion, I ride highway to get to the trailhead, Moab being an example, and have had no problem or concern about either the tires or the tubes not being DOT approved.  It costs money for the manufacturer to obtain DOT approval so they must decide if a sufficient number of riders would use the tire on the road to justify the cost.  For the tires used by most off-roaders, the answer is it doesn't make sense to obtain the certification. There might be no discernable differences between a DOT and a non-DOT tire except for the stamp. However, if you get in an accident you could have a liability issue.

I run 2-3 PSI in the rear and 5-10 in the front to maximize traction.  I ride at a slower pace and have experienced no damage to tire or rim but I sure enjoy the added traction on technical climbs. The bigger footprint of a low-pressure tire also reduces the impact to the trail tread and for me that is a big advantage.

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15 hours ago, Hollerhead said:

And the kickstand is on the wrong side...😁

Yeah, it always reminds me that I'm on a different kind of bike. :busted:
The Trials folks are sometimes too traditional. Remember when gear shifts were on the right, brakes on the left, and kick start levers were on the left. 

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4 hours ago, Chuck. said:

Yeah, it always reminds me that I'm on a different kind of bike. :busted:
The Trials folks are sometimes too traditional. Remember when gear shifts were on the right, brakes on the left, and kick start levers were on the left. 

Yep.  Odd how things change over the years. 

My first HD was right shift, left brake as well.

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On 1/4/2019 at 7:21 AM, Hollerhead said:

I've never used them but there is a member on another forum that has used them on the road for quite a while with no issues. 

That "offroad use only" disclaimer is on most all aftermarket parts because they don't want to spend the money to certify them to meet transportation standards (usually in the US or EU).

Thanks, i was worrued about the disclaimer but i understand now.

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On 1/4/2019 at 7:58 AM, beezer said:

I have them on some offroad bikes I have and they work fine for them but I don't on my XR.

They always leak air slowly even with slime.  You always have to check air pressure before you go out.

On my XR I use heavy duty tubes.

That was going to be my next question, the air loosing part, yeah i think i dont like that part, infact more for the XR, so i guess heavy duty tubes will be. 

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On 1/4/2019 at 10:37 AM, Chas_M said:

Most Tubliss users report less air leakage with Tubliss than with tubes.  My Tubliss front and rear leak less air than when I was using tubes.  The tires remain almost completely inflated for weeks.  Of course you should always check air pressure before you go out with any tire setup.

Thanks, i can leave my bike with tubes for months, wirth almost no air loss, so that part is interesting.

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