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Sometimes when I hit jumps the back end will swing out how do I bring that back around quick?

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Sometimes when I hit jumps the back end will swing out how do I bring that back around quick?


Learn to ride on the balls of your feet and grip bike with your knees. This is eliminate you issue
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I find the throttle can help straighten out the bike when that happens.

Also, if it is stepping out like that without your input, you probably glanced off the side of a bump on the lip. Try and aim for the low spots between the bumps on the lip. I.E. stay in the ruts on the face.

BTW far from an expert here! Just letting you know what helped me.

 

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Figure out why you are kicking out.

1) Hit jump in taller gear (control).

2) Get speed early and hold speed or only slightly accelerate at lip.

3) Monitor lips for notches and kickers.

4) Make sure your suspension is adjusted properly.

5) Make sure you are using the right technique for jumping (buy Gary Semics videos). But squeezing bike with legs is a must.

As for mid air adjustments: Your whole body is involved. Like all new things .... practice, practice practice.  You have to get your upper body in a position to leverage your legs to move bike. It all happens together. Try watching and mimicking better riders who get sideways on purpose.

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Suspension wise,

what may initially appear as too little rebound damping may very well be too much compression damping,

making the rear end deflect off the irregularities on the jump's lip.

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If the bike’s rear has kicked to the right, keep your core loose. This will allow your legs to remain gripping the bike as they reposition, thus avoiding the stiff “Dead sailor” effect. Apply right foot pressure to your right peg and pressure to the left shroud with the inside of your left knee as you snap (smoothly) your bars to the left. At this time, let your core/hip strength help reposition the bike where you prefer. To get a feel for how important the front wheel’s gyro effect is, remove and spin a lightweight bicycle wheel, holding it by each side’s axle tip. Next, push the axle left and right to see and feel the effect of “gyroscopic precession.” Quickly moving your bars in a left turning motion will apply a force to the headset causing the bike to want to bank/lean to the right. Getting all these forces working intuitively will give you greater control, not only while flying but through whoops etc. Use your core and hips to reposition the bike’s attitude along with the other pressures.

 

Tricky to describe, so I hope this makes some sense.

 

Practice safely!

 

 

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9 hours ago, motrock93b said:

.. as you snap (smoothly) your bars to the left.

 

So if the rear tire is kicked out to the right you turn the bars to the left (in addition to all the other things)?

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So if the rear tire is kicked out to the right you turn the bars to the left (in addition to all the other things)?

Yes. Since the rear of the bike, in this example has kicked out to the right, moving the bars to the left (pulling on the left grip) while pressing on the right peg allows the rider to “pull” the bike back under him. The hips also are helpful for pulling the bike into the desired (straightened) position. Pulling the left grip provides the leverage, and all this works best when the upper body leads the actions. The front wheel should be straightened for landing.

This is difficult to describe. Imagine a contraption in your garage which can hold your bike in any position and allows you to be on the bike and use body forces to reposition the bike. In the airborne scenario of the bike having it’s rear kicked to the right, image where you’d place your body and how you’d use your body and the controls to reposition the bike straight. I’d like to move my upper body to the right a bit as I left my midsection loose, enabling me to bend sideways at the waist and comfortably grip with both legs. Initially, the bars will drop away to the left of your body, so your left arm becomes more outstretched. Now you’re in position to bring the bike straight. Pulling on the left grip while applying foot pressure to the right peg will “pull” the bike back under you, aligned straight ahead. Using your hips to pull your legs left allows more force to the motion while also keeping your firmly attached. You’ll most likely find the inside of your left knee assisting by pressing against the left shroud to provide additional leverage against the right peg pressure. The gyro effect of turning the spinning front wheel to the left adds more effect.

That’s a lot to think about and execute in a split second. To simplify. Think of your bike as having many pivot points, leverage points and two gyroscopes. Then it will become more intuitive to use them for control. “Talented” riders have the good fortune of knowing these things innately. I believe that’s why many have difficulty explaining what they do intuitively.
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Motorock, last 2 posts are AWESOME.  I'm just starting to play with bike in the air - on purpose. I do know what you're saying. A bit counterintuitive at first but surely correct on analysis. 

I'm more of a 'mimic' learner but I'm gonna work on your stuff.

Thanks for taking the time for detailed posts!!

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My pleasure. There’s much room for misinterpretation, so I hope nobody gets hurt trying my suggestions. One variable is how the bike is flying. If it’s basically straight and level with just the rear kicked out, or even slightly leaning to the right, that requires a slightly different technique. Obviously, you don’t want to land banked to the right (high side), so in a scenario like that I’d try to quickly get the bike leaned to the left with left peg pressure and the reverse of what I described above to get it in position to correct as indicated above. Time permitting.

A safe and fun way to practice this is on a little jump. On a trail I frequently ride there’s a little jump I take while turning to the right, followed by a left hand turn. I leave the face pitched to the right and have fun changing midair to being pitched left for the landing and turn. It’s really fun, and a safe way to get the feel for all this. Such a technical sport.

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