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mxengineer4

2019 Beta 200RR: Less is More!!!

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4 hours ago, mxengineer4 said:

I felt the same.  The new KTM/Husky 300's are very powerful yet smooth. I put a Keihin 38mm carburetor on my TX300 and the engine runs cleaner and stronger everywhere. Compared to the Beta 200RR the TX300 has lots of torque so instant response to throttle inputs, especially at low rpm's. The TX300 takes more throttle control in the frozen slippery conditions to maintain traction. The Beta 200RR feels noticeably smaller - mostly up front. Easier to thread the 200RR between trees in the tight stuff. The TX300 is agile yet the 200RR feels noticeably lighter in motion. Easy to be lazy on the TX300 while the Beta 200RR takes more effort to keep the engine in the sweet spot. TX300 is a very capable do it all machine. The Beta 200RR is a flickable bike that has a surprisingly strong engine for a small bore. I think the 200RR with a 14T CS might be even more impressive.  Both are great bikes. Nice to have choices!

Excellent comparison and spot on. 

Every cc had trade-offs.

The 200's are flickable, easy to maintain throttle control, and are a real advantage on flatter flowing woods where you can really take advantage of the light weight and keep the motor in the sweet spot.

They can keep you busier with more shifting required than the 300. If riding at speed in embedded rocks, the light weight and less inertia can throw the bike off its line more easily. 

The 200 ads a fun factor that you really don't get much with a 300 as it's light and zippy. Then there's the whole philosophy of you riding the bike vs the bike riding you comparison. 

 

 

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4 hours ago, firffighter said:

Excellent comparison and spot on. 

Every cc had trade-offs.

The 200's are flickable, easy to maintain throttle control, and are a real advantage on flatter flowing woods where you can really take advantage of the light weight and keep the motor in the sweet spot.

They can keep you busier with more shifting required than the 300. If riding at speed in embedded rocks, the light weight and less inertia can throw the bike off its line more easily. 

The 200 ads a fun factor that you really don't get much with a 300 as it's light and zippy. Then there's the whole philosophy of you riding the bike vs the bike riding you comparison. 

 

 

Exactly why 125 and 200s are solid gold. They never chase you down a hill and are super rewarding when you put in the work. It's amazing how quick you recover after a hard ride too, as compared to when riding a bigger bike.

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Excellent comparison and spot on. 
Every cc had trade-offs.
The 200's are flickable, easy to maintain throttle control, and are a real advantage on flatter flowing woods where you can really take advantage of the light weight and keep the motor in the sweet spot.
They can keep you busier with more shifting required than the 300. If riding at speed in embedded rocks, the light weight and less inertia can throw the bike off its line more easily. 
The 200 ads a fun factor that you really don't get much with a 300 as it's light and zippy. Then there's the whole philosophy of you riding the bike vs the bike riding you comparison. 
 
 
Aaaaaaaannnndd I'm back on the 200 bandwagon.
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I have a KX125 in great shape setup for woods, son's bike, not ridden in awhile. Thought about riding it some this spring

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Exactly why 125 and 200s are solid gold. They never chase you down a hill and are super rewarding when you put in the work. It's amazing how quick you recover after a hard ride too, as compared to when riding a bigger bike.
You guys make a good point about putting in the work with riding. I absolutely want a 2 stroke that can do pretty much anything I want it to, but I also dont want that to compromise my active nature on the bike. As far as being "lazy" goes, I only want that feeling in moderate doses. I like working a bit.
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1 hour ago, 230 Sausage said:
3 hours ago, motoxgiant said:
Exactly why 125 and 200s are solid gold. They never chase you down a hill and are super rewarding when you put in the work. It's amazing how quick you recover after a hard ride too, as compared to when riding a bigger bike.

You guys make a good point about putting in the work with riding. I absolutely want a 2 stroke that can do pretty much anything I want it to, but I also dont want that to compromise my active nature on the bike. As far as being "lazy" goes, I only want that feeling in moderate doses. I like working a bit.

sense of accomplishment!

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On 2/2/2019 at 7:19 AM, BassMan said:

Awesome, he said he was in third gear in the corners and was pulling with minimal or no clutch. That was a strong pace for the snow. It was holding it's line great.

Studded tires?

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2 hours ago, Dakar Dan said:

Studded tires?

Yes if you watch the beginning of the video he does a close up of the rear tire and looks like studs....

 

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On 2/11/2019 at 6:03 AM, GP said:

Betas have always been lower in the rear with slightly unbalanced travel (15mm less) than the fork, making the front end sensitive to weight placement and it critical to run less sag than you might like.  I don't know if the 125/200 is like this, why I asked.  Doesn't matter much to me the fix is easy.

That’s your take on suspension setup. That’s not necessarily everyone elses. There are definite differences as lots have a difference of opinion on that.  The Cody Webb 300 race edition setup for example has his bike more exaggerated rear end lower. That’s a bit different too. It’s just his liking.. not mine but maybe I should try just to see. That’s a little chopper action. That you wouldn’t think would help turning but he flies. His bars are even and standard and standard position. I for one don’t get the front end sensitivity at all you refer to. My bike front end straight up sticks and turns awesome. There is zero “fix” to me. I’m thinking maybe it has to do with simple setup and each persons riding style and size. I have my bars in the farthest forward triple clamp hole. Got taller bars. I have 1/2 “ rear offset pegs I’m 6’1” tall and 230 lbs and I have extra long arms. I run 90/100-21 front tires and the biggest hybrid knob rear tires.  My bike is full on point and shoot and the front end sticks. I forget but I think the static is 110 behind and forget the oil weight and how much now. It’s written in my log. Springs are for someone 270 lbs. I’m just sayen just so as to have a more open perception at the start.. plus... you don’t have a 200 yet. I know you want one. From what Ive heard locally I would want one too. A 200 rr is a different bike than a 250/300 and certain 250/300 year bikes are different too.

It does sound like you’ve done a lot of work and research on your 250/300. I’ll give you that. Your bike sounds like it’s setup well. Still it is a different bike than a 200 too. 

 

Edited by hawaiidirtrider

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2 hours ago, kawagumby said:

I'm buying a 200 rr , picking it up friday or saturday.  It'll be fun to compare it to my '94 kdx.

as someone that has recent seat time on a KDX220r and 200rr, I look forward to hearing your impressions. Personally I felt it was a modern day kdx with all the benefits of modern technology. 

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I'm buying a 200 rr , picking it up friday or saturday.  It'll be fun to compare it to my '94 kdx.
Will be great to hear your opinion.
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Got a chance to check out the 200RR engine (disassembled) the other day..Looks like a nice  engine waiting to deliver.

Can't wait to ride on of these and see how much power can be extracted from it.  Of course,  get rid of the oil injected 1st off..

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how is it for case matching/ports etc?

is there  much obvious clean up needed, or do you think it's pretty good out of the box?

not from a modifying point of view, but just getting the most from basically stock.

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