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firffighter

Oil Injection unplugged but not removed

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Here's my plan with my new '18 300rr. I will be getting a plate for it at some point and want to maintain the option for quickly hooking my OI back up for those days I'll be using for "dualsport" which will just be running down old logging dirt roads. 

I want to use the oil injection for those easy riding days and I can simply top of my gas tank and not carry oil or cans of premix. So, I do NOT want to remove or block off the OI. 

But, for most of my regular woods ridng, I want to have the OI unplugged and just run premix. 

So, after looking closely at the system and the Beta document for OI removal, I believe there's basically only 2 things needed to disable the OI.

1) Unplug the electrical plug to the OI pump in the airbox. This disables the oil injection pump and basically the system is now disabled. 

2) Unplug the TPS. This disables the metering. 

*Do I need to unplug the oil sending unit from the oil tank? Is this necessary? 

My assumption is that if I leave a small amount of oil in the OI tank and keep the injection port with tube intact, it's not going to introduce air into the intake and I'll be safe in that regard and able to simply run premix. 

Then, on days I want to use the oil injection, I simply plug in the TPS and oil pump, drain the premix and replace with regular gas and system will be intact and running. 

Then, I may have the warning indicator on the dash computer blinking or on at all times when the system is disconnected.I can ignore the warning indicator. 

Do I have my bases covered here? 

I haven't seen anyone else do this, so want to make sure I have it correct, but seems pretty basic. 

 

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Unplug the pump, leave TPS intact. fold the feed tube over on itself and zip tie it to crimp flow/gravity drip. done. Ride. 

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1 minute ago, redhurricane said:

Unplug the pump, leave TPS intact. fold the feed tube over on itself and zip tie it to crimp flow/gravity drip. done. Ride. 

Excellent. Much appreciated. 

The TPS won't be attempting to meter if it remains plugged in? 

From my understanding, even the RE models have the TPS installed, but I wasn't clear on if it plugged in.  

 

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Hard to meter oil on a pump that is not plugged in. The TPS is only a signal of voltage sent to the ecu. 

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1 minute ago, redhurricane said:

Hard to meter oil on a pump that is not plugged in. The TPS is only a signal of voltage sent to the ecu. 

Yeah I am clear that once the pump is disabled the system is disabled, but the directions on the Beta document indicate unplugging the TPS

Any issues with unplugging the TPS vs keeping it plugged in? Can't find anything indicating anything one way or another. 

How about the oil sending unit? If I unplug it from the oil tank will the warning light still come on? 

 

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44 minutes ago, firffighter said:

Yeah I am clear that once the pump is disabled the system is disabled, but the directions on the Beta document indicate unplugging the TPS

Any issues with unplugging the TPS vs keeping it plugged in? Can't find anything indicating anything one way or another. 

How about the oil sending unit? If I unplug it from the oil tank will the warning light still come on? 

 

Haven't unplugged oil level or TPS. Oil warning light stays lit but I don't care.

Get yourself a non-OI reed intake boot and you're done. I don't like your plan for having off or on the OI system.

You are looking to introduce an air feed source to the engine.

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49 minutes ago, dirtbird said:

I don't like your plan for having off or on the OI system.

You are looking to introduce an air feed source to the engine.

There's someone on the Beta site or here, can't remember, who keeps the tubing intact with a small amount of oil in the tank and runs it that way. No air able to enter into the system. 

 

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1 minute ago, RetroRanger said:

why :confused:

Care to elaborate? 

It's simple really, for hard woods ridng I predominantly do, the system is disabled.

For ease of OI and ability to stop at local gas station and top off tank on days of cruising on back roads the system is plugged back in. 

Seems fairly straightforward. 

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ok but why disable the OI at all ive had various OI systems on different vehicles w no issues no matter where or how hard i ride ?

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12 minutes ago, RetroRanger said:

ok but why disable the OI at all ive had various OI systems on different vehicles w no issues no matter where or how hard i ride ?

There's quite a few guys who've had issues with the system and a quick and easy unplug only ensures no issues when hitting the faster harder hitting terrain. No big deal, I'm not really too nervous about the system failing, but if I can simply unplug for easy enable and disable, I'll go that route for peace of mind. 

Definitely prefer prefer not debate OI reliability as that's been discussed to death and I've fully researched the issue and have 2 riding partners with the OI and very familiar with the system.

Edited by firffighter

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Pre mix fan here. 32 40 50 or 60 to 1 is all gonna work. Buy some small quantity outboard oil in the 3.2 ounce size (or whatever) and dump them in at the gas station. At the speeds and pressure I put on my bike; it don’t matter. It’s one tank of fuel (if that) because you’re gonna top it off at camp or home eventually. :excuseme:

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I do some long distance trips and would like to use the OI for those days as well as multi day trips in Eastern Oregon I have planned. 

Again, just wanting to confirm if my plan to disable the OI and leave everything in tact is going to work, not looking for other alternatives. 

I'll check with Beta to confirm if no one else trying this or has experience doing this method. Sounds like red has. 

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You've got a pretty good grasp on OI operation and the suggestions offered so far are all pretty good, but I'll chime in again... because internet forum, lol.

The ECU monitors the TPS signal (which is actually carb slide position) to guesstimate engine RPM, and then adjusts the PWM control signal to the oil pump according to its preprogrammed map.  So ECU is king of OI operation.  The ECU also monitors for valid electrical connection of the TPS and oil pump, and turns on the OI system failure light on the dash if one of those components goes missing.  The oil tank "low level" sensor is an independent circuit that isn't monitored by the ECU, but instead is wired directly to the dash warning light.

So all you need to do to temporarily disable OI is:

  • Disconnect the electrical connector to the OI pump, which will prevent it from operating. At this point, the ECU will see the pump is missing and illuminate the failure light.  You can either ignore the light or optionally disconnect the wire for the light near the dash.
  • There's no need to disconnect the TPS electrical connector or physically remove the TP{S from the carb.  However, some that remove OI permanently report seeing lower throttle spring tension without TPS which is why a TPS plug is included in the factory OI Removal Kit.
  • There's no need to disconnect the oil level sensor electrical connector unless 1) the oil tank is low, and 2) the warning light on the dash is keeping you up at night.
  • IMHO the biggest decision you have to make for intermittent use of OI like you describe is what to do with the oil line going into the intake manifold.  The OI pump is a piston-style design, much like a syringe with a plunger, so leak-through should be minimal or non-existent if the pump is disconnected.  I removed mine completely a long time ago but if I was doing what you are I'd probably just leave the oil lines connected to the intake manifold unless you see oil going missing from the tank after a while.

Did I miss anything?

 

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54 minutes ago, RetroRanger said:

ok but why disable the OI at all ive had various OI systems on different vehicles w no issues no matter where or how hard i ride ?

 

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6 minutes ago, wwguy said:

You've got a pretty good grasp on OI operation and the suggestions offered so far are all pretty good, but I'll chime in again... because internet forum, lol.

The ECU monitors the TPS signal (which is actually carb slide position) to guesstimate engine RPM, and then adjusts the PWM control signal to the oil pump according to its preprogrammed map.  So ECU is king of OI operation.  The ECU also monitors for valid electrical connection of the TPS and oil pump, and turns on the OI system failure light on the dash if one of those components goes missing.  The oil tank "low level" sensor is an independent circuit that isn't monitored by the ECU, but instead is wired directly to the dash warning light.

So all you need to do to temporarily disable OI is:

  • Disconnect the electrical connector to the OI pump, which will prevent it from operating. At this point, the ECU will see the pump is missing and illuminate the failure light.  You can either ignore the light or optionally disconnect the wire for the light near the dash.
  • There's no need to disconnect the TPS electrical connector or physically remove the TP{S from the carb.  However, some that remove OI permanently report seeing lower throttle spring tension without TPS which is why a TPS plug is included in the factory OI Removal Kit.
  • There's no need to disconnect the oil level sensor electrical connector unless 1) the oil tank is low, and 2) the warning light on the dash is keeping you up at night.
  • IMHO the biggest decision you have to make for intermittent use of OI like you describe is what to do with the oil line going into the intake manifold.  The OI pump is a piston-style design, much like a syringe with a plunger, so leak-through should be minimal or non-existent if the pump is disconnected.  I removed mine completely a long time ago but if I was doing what you are I'd probably just leave the oil lines connected to the intake manifold unless you see oil going missing from the tank after a while.

Did I miss anything?

 

Thank you so much! Exactly what I was looking for! 

I have read of the softer throttle response with removing the OI or installing the softer throttle spring. After the first couple of rides I feel the throttle response is fine. 

I'll simply unplug the OI pump and monitor my tank for any oil dripping into intake.

Thanks again for the detailed information, and even on the TT forum, Lol

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14 minutes ago, Mullet2Skullet said:

Sounds to me like you need a second bike for dual sport rides...say, maybe a 390?

😁

Hehe. Funny.

Out of the 1500 miles I put on the 390 about 150 were used for plate. But, when you just have a day or 2 to explore out in the beautiful PNW, the plate comes in handy. 

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One of the biggest flaws is the plumbing and the way the nipple is retained in the manifold. It's weak and pulls out very easy, I've done it by accident removing the tubing on an XT. I agree with dirtbird, and would get another manifold for piece of mind. Not hard to swap, no gasket involved against the composite reed block.

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