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supersprox front sprocket vs ktm


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I read somewhere that the best front sprocket was the OEM KTM one. Any road, my bike eats them. I ride it every weekend and so it gets lots of use. I end up changing them nearly every 2 months.

I am always worried about the wear on the front sprocket as I went out riding once and i did two full days in a row. When we were out I was going through some deep mud and had to kind of paddle my way out using my feet and lifting my weight off the bike as it was just digging a hole. When I did it I could hear this sound which I thought was the chain slipping on the front sprocket. I didn't know it had being slipping until I replaced the worn front sprocket. I figured it was the worn sprocket that had caused the chain to slip around the front sprocket conbined with the chain being on the upper region of chain tension specification because we had been out for two days. I figured as soon as the front sprocket starts to get slightly worn it needs changing. Cut a long story short because my bike eats front sprockets and I was using KTM ones I thought I would try supersprox front sprockets to see if they last longer. 

I have just replace my worn supersprox and when I compared it to my OEM KTM one I have only just noticed a number of differences.

Supersprox. Not that worn really but starting to get hooked. About 30% of original metal worn away. This was approximately what the last OEM KTM one was like when the chain started to slip around it when I lifted my weight off the bike in the deep mud.

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When I stood my supersprox front sprocket on end up against my OEM KTM one I noticed how much bigger the teeth are compared to the KTM one. It makes a lot of difference around the overall diameter of the sprocket. You can also clearly see this if you push the sprockets up against the chain as the teeth go much further through the chain. It's as if the supersprox teeth have been made the same height as the entire KTM one and then they stuck the pointy triangle bit on the top. I know this isn't entirely true, as the teeth resting on the bench are the same height, but you get my meaning.

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Basically what I am trying to say is that if I had been running the supersprox front sprocket, even worn, it would not have slipped the chain as easily as the KTM one as the teeth are that much bigger. My advice would be if you are going to buy a new front sprocket then buy supersprox over KTM. Especially if you are going to run them to a little worn as I believe there is a lot less chance of your chain slipping and I think that they would be more reliable. Wear wise they are both about the same. Now I can't really prove this until I have tested a front supersprox sprocket to death. So I will post back after I run the one I have just stuck on, in to the deck. But I reckon that the worn supersprox front sprocket that I just took off could have been left on for much longer. Or if you just find yourself doing a lot of riding and getting caught out with your front sprocket wear then the supersprox would be more reliable when worn. Hope that was of some interest. 

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Edited by albrown
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Your chain is worn out and/or your chain adjustment is too tight. Sprockets and Chain wear together and need to be replaced on the same schedule. 

Replace it all and you'll get much longer service life from each part. Your CS issue is the weak link because it is the smallest sprocket and sees more links rotating around it on a per mile or hour basis.

Do a search online for chain adjustment methods for KTM. It is a common issue for some guys to tighten chain too much and not realize it. I did it BITD and ruined a Yamaha IT400 swingarm. 

 

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I wish it was m8 thats for sure. I have tried everything. Chain was new (DID 520 VT2). Rear stealth sprocket was new. Front sprockets were all new. The bike just eats front sprockets. No question about it. Its obviously use dependant thats for sure. I run 14:52

I even adjust my chain by compressing the rear suspension at the chains tightest point as a final check once the rear wheel is done up. You might laugh at me doing that. But its always worked for me and I have been dong that for years. You can't over tighten it that way and its a great check to do. The chain is definitely not too tight or too loose or worn. The bike has been doing it for the last 2 years and I have gone through 3 new chains on it and 3 rear stealth sprockets so far and countless fronts. Tried everything. It just eats front sprockets more than the chain or rears sprocket. 

I am not replacing a chain and rear sprocket every 2 months. I can just about afford replacing the front sprockets ? 

The front sprocket is definitely going to have to get changed out on its own more often than the rest ? 

P.S. 2 months for me is 8 days riding. I ride every weekend without fail. I was just pointing out something from my experience. But still, I would definitely get a supersprox over KTM front regardless. The teeth are definitely higher so I believe that they would be more reliable. As the sprocket wears the teeth get ever so slightly higher too as the sprocket gets narrower. Which I reckon would make them even more reliable. When you put a KTM sprocket up agains the chain it barley passes all the way though the other side. The supersprox clears the other side of the chain much further. You can see it. Purely on that, I think its a much better sprocket and I defiantly don't think that my chain would have slipped on my front sprocket when I was in that deep mud if I had had a supersprox on there. Just my opinion. Hope it helps ?

Edited by albrown
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2 hours ago, albrown said:

I wish it was m8 thats for sure. I have tried everything. Chain was new (DID 520 VT2). Rear stealth sprocket was new. Front sprockets were all new. The bike just eats front sprockets. No question about it. Its obviously use dependant thats for sure. I run 14:52

I even adjust my chain by compressing the rear suspension at the chains tightest point as a final check once the rear wheel is done up. You might laugh at me doing that. But its always worked for me and I have been dong that for years. You can't over tighten it that way and its a great check to do. The chain is definitely not too tight or too loose or worn. The bike has been doing it for the last 2 years and I have gone through 3 new chains on it and 3 rear stealth sprockets so far and countless fronts. Tried everything. It just eats front sprockets more than the chain or rears sprocket. 

I am not replacing a chain and rear sprocket every 2 months. I can just about afford replacing the front sprockets ? 

The front sprocket is definitely going to have to get changed out on its own more often than the rest ? 

P.S. 2 months for me is 8 days riding. I ride every weekend without fail. I was just pointing out something from my experience. But still, I would definitely get a supersprox over KTM front regardless. The teeth are definitely higher so I believe that they would be more reliable. As the sprocket wears the teeth get ever so slightly higher too as the sprocket gets narrower. Which I reckon would make them even more reliable. When you put a KTM sprocket up agains the chain it barley passes all the way though the other side. The supersprox clears the other side of the chain much further. You can see it. Purely on that, I think its a much better sprocket and I defiantly don't think that my chain would have slipped on my front sprocket when I was in that deep mud if I had had a supersprox on there. Just my opinion. Hope it helps ?

Have you tried the tool steel CS from Dirt Tricks? I've been riding KTM's mostly my whole life and never had a failed or CS worn that much. I typically replace my entire drive system once a season or if I see obvious elongation of the sprocket tooth profile. I replace with Dirt Tricks Sprockets since they came out and to be honest have never seen a Dirt Tricks sprocket wear enough to replace (not saying it doesn't happen) but I probably sell the bike before it ever wears enough. 

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I replaced my CS sproket with OEM KTM when changing gearing at 50 hours and the rear sprocket looked brand new while there was noticeable but not terrible wear on the CS sprocket. 

I tend to stick to OEM CS sprockets as I heard there were spacing / alignment issues with aftermarket (not sure which brands in particular) and i'm paranoid about the spline on the counter shaft getting worn out due to not having a good mesh or the material used in the sprocket being too hard etc.  

but given that I wouldn't bother buying the expensive steel teeth / al frame combo rear sprokets and just buy the cheap primary gear from RMATV as the CS sprocket will wear out faster anyway it seems and would rather just replace the whole set with OEM CS, then Prmary drive chain and rear

Edited by Dirt Rider 12345
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On my '13 300 xcw that I bought new, it's on it's 3rd CS sprocket while the rear and chain are still original. At the first sign of any significant cupping of the CS sprocket tooth valley, I swap it out. I believe a worn CS will make the other 2 items wear faster and since a new CS is cheap, it's a no brainer. The rear is just now looking like I should change it. Will probably do a new chain at the same time.

 

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I'm glad its not just me then. I think my friend hit the nail on the head this weekend when we were out when I suggested just riding it smoothly and not cracking the throttle. He said, £14 over the price of having fun and giving it the gas and doing odd wheelie every now and then. £14 is not worth worrying about...

I did take some more pics when I was out of the OEM KTM front sprocket and the supersprox front sprocket. If you are like me and find yourself going through front sprockets more than the chain and rear sprocket then I think you might find this of interest. 

I had a better look at both sprockets and because the KTM teeth are that much lower where the triangle bit on the top is, when the sprocket starts to wear it eats in to the front side of each teeth part of the sprocket. Because the teeth are that much lower once the wear hits the front edge of the triangle the triangle due to its shape just mades a ready made ramp for the chain to try to slide up. If that kind of makes sense... 

If you look at the wear on the supersprox front sprocket that I just took off the wear is underneath the triangle bit on the top. Its actually made that hook wear shape in the sprocket. Coin the term 'hooked' front sprocket. I am certain you could generate a hooked front sprocket with the OEM KTM one but under the right conditions just as the wear starts to meet the front edge of that triangle your chain could rise over the top of the sprocket if you have your weight off the bike and the power on. Like I had when I was pushing the bike along in the mud. 

I posted another couple of pics. One of the supersprox front sprocket where you can see the hooked shape developing. Still safe though. And one of the KTM OEM one where I used a pen and drew the wear shape of the supersprox front sprocket on to the KTM. You can see that if the KTM one was worn the same as the supersprox that the front edge of the triangle would now be acting as a ramp and adding to the actually wear shape because its that much lower. I think its something to be aware of and if you are going to be buying a front sprocket get the supersprox one. I only roughly drew the line on there, but you should get the idea what I am on about. Its not a problem or anything, just something that maybe of interest. It defiantly was the cause of my chain slipping around the front sprocket the other day. Thanks for the comments guys. 

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Edited by albrown
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I agree that with that kind of wear they're still "safe" to run.

With the CS sprocket turning an average of 3 times more than the rear, it sees 3 times the wear in the same amount of time. As the CS starts to hook, it's also stretching the chain links to meet. As those stretched links make their way around to the rear, they wear the rear teeth valleys to meet the stretched links of the chain.

So in the interests of longevity for the other two more expensive components, I swap out my CS regularly. Keep the used sprockets as doanor sprockets, to give away to college students, and wall art.

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