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What are some differences between years and which one is better then other ? Looking into this 2015 for sale and i can use some input from the more wise. Any advice is appreciated

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You posted to the 450 forum. The 17 got a few engine updates and I think the 250 fx got the bigger front rotor at some point. From what I’ve heard the updates are really minor. I have a 15 and it’s a great bike. I think the 20 will get the same updates as the 19 450 fx. That’s going to be my next bike.

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You posted to the 450 forum. The 17 got a few engine updates and I think the 250 fx got the bigger front rotor at some point. From what I’ve heard the updates are really minor. I have a 15 and it’s a great bike. I think the 20 will get the same updates as the 19 450 fx. That’s going to be my next bike.

Thanks man !!

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The aftermarket for this bike is HUGE.  I wouldn't fuss about year-year updates.  Just buy whatever accessories or updates you deem important.

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I have a 2015 and no complaints.  Changes since seemed minor overall.  I did put the larger front brake rotor kit on with good pads, SS lines, and quality brake fluid.

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Are there any clearance issues with the larger disk?  

 

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On 4/15/2019 at 8:00 AM, Dirtbikepaulito said:

 

What are some differences between years and which one is better then other ? Looking into this 2015 for sale and i can use some input from the more wise. Any advice is appreciated

 

I've had both 2015 and 2017 250FX's.  Can't really tell the difference to be honest.  Yes the bigger front rotor is a bit better, but I never had an problem with the smaller one, the brakes are fine on both bikes.  It is a great bike, for sure.  The engine has lots of low end grunt for a 250 and because it is a 4 stroke, it gets great traction - especially if you go tubliss.    Search on here to find the map post from me to get the "hard map softened" and get someone with a tuner to put that on the bike, and you then will not need a tuner -  unless you need to read error codes or hours.   The suspension is easily the best on the market.  The reliability is Yamaha, nothing else needs to be said! 

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I've had both 2015 and 2017 250FX's.  Can't really tell the difference to be honest.  Yes the bigger front rotor is a bit better, but I never had an problem with the smaller one, the brakes are fine on both bikes.  It is a great bike, for sure.  The engine has lots of low end grunt for a 250 and because it is a 4 stroke, it gets great traction - especially if you go tubliss.    Search on here to find the map post from me to get the "hard map softened" and get someone with a tuner to put that on the bike, and you then will not need a tuner -  unless you need to read error codes or hours.   The suspension is easily the best on the market.  The reliability is Yamaha, nothing else needs to be said! 

I haven’t even thrown my leg over it yet, can’t wait to see it in person. I appreciate the feedback thanks

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Just now, Dirtbikepaulito said:


I haven’t even thrown my leg over it yet, can’t wait to see it in person. I appreciate the feedback thanks emoji106.png

Beware - it is a tall bike.  But - don't let that spook you.  There are many many threads on this website on what to do if you are vertically challenged, like some of us!!  

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Beware - it is a tall bike.  But - don't let that spook you.  There are many many threads on this website on what to do if you are vertically challenged, like some of us!!  

I would say I’m about 5’10 with boots, I’m sure there’s a lowering link for these ?

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Yea, but some of us recommend against a lowering link, they change the geometry for the negative.   At 5'10' you will be border line, unless you are a really good rider -  then just ride it.    If you need to lower the bike, lower both the forks and shock by 1"  by your  professional suspension tuner, unless you do that kind of work yourself.  Search for it here, there are many, many threads.   Depending upon your weight and ability you may need new springs anyway.  I'm a small guy so I went with the Japanese settings for springs - its all in the manual and my suspension is plush.  One other thing -  the ICS springs are too stiff at 2.0 for even big guys.  I tried 1.0's for a year then went with 1.4's and they are perfect.  For all those reading this, changing your ICS springs makes a HUGE difference!   Most guys should go with 1.6's, smaller guys 1.4's.   Cheap mod that enables the forks to soak up the hack on the trail.

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Yea, but some of us recommend against a lowering link, they change the geometry for the negative.   At 5'10' you will be border line, unless you are a really good rider -  then just ride it.    If you need to lower the bike, lower both the forks and shock by 1"  by your  professional suspension tuner, unless you do that kind of work yourself.  Search for it here, there are many, many threads.   Depending upon your weight and ability you may need new springs anyway.  I'm a small guy so I went with the Japanese settings for springs - its all in the manual and my suspension is plush.  One other thing -  the ICS springs are too stiff at 2.0 for even big guys.  I tried 1.0's for a year then went with 1.4's and they are perfect.  For all those reading this, changing your ICS springs makes a HUGE difference!   Most guys should go with 1.6's, smaller guys 1.4's.   Cheap mod that enables the forks to soak up the hack on the trail.

I think I can get by without the lowering link, I would never want to risk giving up the ergonomic feel for an inch of space. Thanks for the advice and info it’s much appreciated by everyone and myself

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Most of the 17+ engine changes can be put in the 15-16 easily. When I did the top end on my 15 I used the updated piston, pin, and oil squirter. I got a 2018 and like the electronics cover, but it lacks a kick starter which I don’t like. 

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Shredjim said:

Yea, but some of us recommend against a lowering link, they change the geometry for the negative.   At 5'10' you will be border line, unless you are a really good rider -  then just ride it.    If you need to lower the bike, lower both the forks and shock by 1"  by your  professional suspension tuner, unless you do that kind of work yourself.  Search for it here, there are many, many threads.   Depending upon your weight and ability you may need new springs anyway.  I'm a small guy so I went with the Japanese settings for springs - its all in the manual and my suspension is plush.  One other thing -  the ICS springs are too stiff at 2.0 for even big guys.  I tried 1.0's for a year then went with 1.4's and they are perfect.  For all those reading this, changing your ICS springs makes a HUGE difference!   Most guys should go with 1.6's, smaller guys 1.4's.   Cheap mod that enables the forks to soak up the hack on the trail.

Pardon my ignorance but what what are ICS springs?  Are those the small springs at the top of the fork (base valve?)

Yep, I look them up and thats exactly what they are.  By your post it would seem the OEM spring rate for these is 2.0?

Edited by CDNSXV
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9 minutes ago, CDNSXV said:

Pardon my ignorance but what what are ICS springs?  Are those the small springs at the top of the fork (base valve?)

Yes, they are the small springs at the top of the forks. When I first had my 2015 FX  back when they first came out - I felt the forks were stiff on the original part of stroke. A guy on here named Monk (I think he changed his username when he went orange) was recommending changing the ICS springs - so a bunch of us did with positive results!

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And which rate springs did you choose?

Racetech offers 1.0, 1.4, 1.8 and 2.2 kg/mm options

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2 minutes ago, CDNSXV said:

And which rate springs did you choose?

Racetech offers 1.0, 1.4, 1.8 and 2.2 kg/mm options

On the recommendation of my tuner I tried 1.0’s and they were too soft and made the forks dive a bit on original part of stroke. So - I tried 1.4’s and they are perfect for my weight - 165lbs before gear. 175 lbs and up go with 1.6’s. 

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Racetech lists 1.4 and 1.8 and I'm not sure if the 1.8 will be enough of a change from stock.  If there was a 1.6, that'd be what I'd choose but if I have to compromise, I'd go with slightly soft vs slightly hard.

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Posted (edited)

Aftermarket ICS springs are usually offered in 1.2, 1.4, 1.6 and 1.8 rates  (Race Tech)

Yamaha 'SSS' / KYB closed cartridge forks typically use 2.0 springs.

 

These springs pressurize the inner cartridge, more pressure equals better resistance to cavitation on big hits

but also act to stiffen the overall spring rate of the forks. A stiffer spring builds pressure sooner in the stroke.

 

I've experimented with 1.4 in my YZ125, thinking a light bike and myself relatively light a 160lbs would obtain good results

but, being an MX track ridden only bike the light springs actually made it handle worse. (riding too low in the stroke)

 

If ever you guys experiment, keep in mind it's normal for these ICS springs to have quite a bit of free play (1/4"-3/8")

and don't be tempted to preload them as it makes for very stiff initial travel (even for MX).

IMO better results are acheived in tweaking the valving rather than lowering the ICS spring rate.

Edited by mlatour

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I ride exclusively in slow, technical woods full of broken rock and roots, so soft is what I'm after.

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