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JD Jetting question....


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So i've had my 450L for about 2 months now. I LOVE the bike but my only complaint (along with many other people) is the choppiness on the low end of first gear. I'm not really looking to change my exhaust system yet but I would like for the bike to run just slightly cooler and have a little more throttle response. My idea is to get the JD Jetting tuner and remove the spark arrestor in the muffler. Looking to get some input on this idea and also wondering if it will make the fuel reading inaccurate with the JD jetting tuner. Not too sure if the fuel reading is an actual reading from the inside of the tank or if it is done by the odometer when you reset it after you fill up. Just to be a little more clear...by fuel reading I just mean amount of fuel left in the tank itself.

Edited by xtimesofgrace
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So i've had my 450L for about 2 months now. I LOVE the bike but my only complaint (along with many other people) is the choppiness on the low end of first gear. I'm not really looking to change my exhaust system yet but I would like for the bike to run just slightly cooler and have a little more throttle response. My idea is to get the JD Jetting tuner and remove the spark arrestor in the muffler. Looking to get some input on this idea and also wondering if it will make the fuel reading inaccurate with the JD jetting tuner. Not too sure if the fuel reading is an actual reading from the inside of the tank or if it is done by the odometer when you reset it after you fill up.


I have a JD jetting with a full XR’s Only exhaust and smog block off. The fuel monitoring still works and seems to be accurate, but now my gas mileage is worse than stock but my bike runs night and day different.

There is a stock setting with the JD Jetting and they are super helpful. If you removed the spark arrester you would probably just have to mess with the settings to make it richer also remove the air box cover. This is totally adjustable. Just make sure you don’t go below #3 on any of the settings. I talked to JD Jetting and they said anything under #3 setting would be too lean and could hurt your motor.
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1 hour ago, MarkCRF450L said:

 


I have a JD jetting with a full XR’s Only exhaust and smog block off. The fuel monitoring still works and seems to be accurate, but now my gas mileage is worse than stock but my bike runs night and day different.

There is a stock setting with the JD Jetting and they are super helpful. If you removed the spark arrester you would probably just have to mess with the settings to make it richer also remove the air box cover. This is totally adjustable. Just make sure you don’t go below #3 on any of the settings. I talked to JD Jetting and they said anything under #3 setting would be too lean and could hurt your motor.

oh ok cool! So you think it is worth getting one if i leave the exhaust system stock and all the other emissions junk on? SRmoto has one for $209 right now. I live in an area where an emissions test on a vehicle isnt even required. Hell, if it improves it that much then ill probably just leave the spark arrestor in.

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oh ok cool! So you think it is worth getting one if i leave the exhaust system stock and all the other emissions junk on? SRmoto has one for $209 right now. I live in an area where an emissions test on a vehicle isnt even required. Hell, if it improves it that much then ill probably just leave the spark arrestor in.


For $209.00 I think you will be happy. You can always buy a pipe later. It is a cheap investment. Even if you get a pipe down the road, you will need something or you will burn up the power valves and pipe because stock runs too lean. I got the pipe not only to work better, sounds better, but it is also about 10 pounds lighter and looks better. I still has a spark arrester on my XR’s Only Pipe. I used my stock heat shield so I wouldn’t burn my leg.

At least you won’t be like a lot of people who are upset because they spent $760.00 with tax and still haven’t received anything their Vortex ECU.

I ordered a Vortex ECU from MT Racing a little while after I bought my bike in early October. It was taking forever to come in, so I ordered the JD Jetting because it was available for immediate shipping and I was able to get it for about $200.00.

About 3-5 days after I ordered the JD Jetting and had already received it, MT Racing called me and told me they had my Vortex ECU in stock.

When I told them I had changed my mind they were really cool and told me not to worry about because they had a huge waiting list.

I figured if the JD Jetting fuel tuner sucked, I would just buy the Vortex and sell the JD Jetting fuel tuner for cheap. So far I am really happy with the JD Jetting and I am sure you will be too.

Don’t get me wrong, if I am able to ride a CRF450L with the same setup as mine with a Vortex ECU and there is a huge difference between them, I will order a Vortex ECU and let people know. But I have not yet seen any comparisons between the JD Jetting and the Vortex side by side.

But I do know for sure that $760.00 after tax is way more than about $200.00 plus tax.
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Awesome! I appreciate the info! I just ordered the JD Jetting tuner. Hopefully it will be here by the weekend! Down the line, I may get an FMF exhaust or a yoshi im not too sure yet. If i do get an exhaust would a slip on be fine or would I need to change the header too?


You need to get a header too because they are made for a CRF450X because of the EPA restrictions. Honda made both headers different sizes and they don’t match up. If you look at both side by side, you will want a different header too. The stock is very small and restrictive. A couple hundred dollars more for the header isn’t that big of a deal if you compare it to your total investment. Unlike some other bikes where swapping out the exhaust doesn’t make a big difference, the CRF450L does because it had a catalytic converter.

The result is a non restricted bike that weighs almost 10 pounds lighter, sounds better and looks better. If you can afford to swap out exhaust, you won’t be disappointed.
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I agree with all MarkCRF450L has said and I think you'll be very happy with the JD tuner. I dialed mine in with the green light on setting 6 and all that choppy throttle down low is gone. Cheap investment for tunability, even for stock bikes as they have them running so lean and hot. My bike seems to run way cooler with the right AF mixture now.

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I just got mine and I love it!  My settings are 3.5,  4,  4.5,  6,  3.5,  3.  As for the fuel metering, the ECU knows how much fuel it's telling the injector to send.  Since the JD tuner plugs directly to the injector the ECU is not aware of the extra fuel that it being sent.  This will affect the reading but the variance is minimal.  The largest fuel increase is at idle (setting of 6).  The fuel increase on the other modes is very small.  There will be a slight inaccuracy though.  I noticed on my tuner that the back of the connector that plugs in the injector was not properly sealed (they have two wires going in a single rubber grommet) I added some RTV silicone to the back of the connector to prevent water from getting in.

The improvement in driveability is worth every dollar that the JD tuner costs.  I has completely changed my trail riding experience.

 

 

 

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4 hours ago, dp19 said:

I just got mine and I love it!  My settings are 3.5,  4,  4.5,  6,  3.5,  3.  As for the fuel metering, the ECU knows how much fuel it's telling the injector to send.  Since the JD tuner plugs directly to the injector the ECU is not aware of the extra fuel that it being sent.  This will affect the reading but the variance is minimal.  The largest fuel increase is at idle (setting of 6).  The fuel increase on the other modes is very small.  There will be a slight inaccuracy though.  I noticed on my tuner that the back of the connector that plugs in the injector was not properly sealed (they have two wires going in a single rubber grommet) I added some RTV silicone to the back of the connector to prevent water from getting in.

The improvement in driveability is worth every dollar that the JD tuner costs.  I has completely changed my trail riding experience.

 

 

 

How do you like those settings? Did it eliminate the choppy throttle on the low end? I might start with these settings if it does.

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6 hours ago, xtimesofgrace said:

How do you like those settings? Did it eliminate the choppy throttle on the low end? I might start with these settings if it does.

I'd say it eliminated about 90% of it, enough for it to be a non-issue.  From my understanding (and I could be wrong) there are two things that causes the choppy throttle.  The first one is the extremely lean idle that transitions into a much richer (but still lean) low throttle.  Every time you apply a tiny bit of throttle it leaves that lean idle state with a jerk into the less lean low throttle position.  This is what causes 90% of the chop you're feeling and this is what the JD fuel controller fixes (the higher setting of 6 for the idle zone).  This brings the idle mixture evenly with the low throttle mixture allowing for a seamless transition.  This greatly improves low-speed trail riding experience. 

The second source of chop is that while decelerating with no throttle applied the ECU cuts out the fuel injector completely until you approach the idle RPM where it switches it on again to prevent stalling.  If you release the throttle and re-apply throttle before reaching idle you can feel the injector kick in again (and you can see this happening on the JD with the flashing lights).  The chop under this condition is much less severe and is common to most fuel-injected bikes.  The JD (or any add-on fuel controller) will not fix this.  Someone coming off a carbureted bike is more likely to notice this as carburetors don't completely cut off fuel when the throttle is released.

Something to take note about the JD is that the order of the zones on the instructions sheet and on the programming sequence are in a different order than how they are triggered while riding.  For example, when programming or looking at the sheet you see the following zones :1 GREEN, 2 YELLOW, 3 RED, 4 GREEN/BLUE, 5 YELLOW/BLUE, 6 RED/BLUE.  When riding from idle to full throttle they are triggered in the following order (Ignore zone 6 because it's not really a zone):

4 Green/Blue - Idle (setting of 6)
1 Green - Low throttle (setting of 3.5)
5 Yellow/Blue - Low-medium throttle (setting of 3.5)
2 Yellow - Medium throttle (setting of 4)
3 Red - Full throttle  (setting of 4.5)

6 Red/Blue - accelerator pump

So effectively the sequence of fuel adjustments are triggered as follows when riding:   6,  3.5,  3.5,  4,  4.5.  You can see that it's a gradual progression except for the idle which was way too lean from the factory.

Again, note that setting all the zones to 3 makes it run like stock with no tuner.  Higher number increases fuel while lower number decreases fuel

As for the settings I picked, the two I changed from the recommended values was the idle (6) which was recommended by others for the throttle chop and the Yellow/Blue zone to 3.5 instead of 4 because I could feel the transition from the Green zone (3.5) to the Yellow/Blue zone (4).  The setting of 4 is slightly more powerful than the setting of 3.5 and the switchover was noticeable especially because this happens at a relatively low throttle position.  Matching it to the green zone (3.5) the transition was eliminated and if I want more power I can just apply more throttle until I hit the Yellow zone (4).  With these settings everything is seamless and I don't feel any transitions at any throttle positions.

Lastly, I've only had the tuner for a little while and I'm still experimenting with it.  These may not be my final settings.

The instruction sheets have been posted in this thread

I hope all this makes sense and sorry for the long write-up.

 

 

 

  

Edited by dp19
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2 hours ago, dp19 said:

I'd say it eliminated about 90% of it, enough for it to be a non-issue.  From my understanding (and I could be wrong) there are two things that causes the choppy throttle.  The first one is the extremely lean idle that transitions into a much richer (but still lean) low throttle.  Every time you apply a tiny bit of throttle it leaves that lean idle state with a jerk into the less lean low throttle position.  This is what causes 90% of the chop you're feeling and this is what the JD fuel controller fixes (the higher setting of 6 for the idle zone).  This brings the idle mixture evenly with the low throttle mixture allowing for a seamless transition.  This greatly improves low-speed trail riding experience. 

The second source of chop is that while decelerating with no throttle applied the ECU cuts out the fuel injector completely until you approach the idle RPM where it switches it on again to prevent stalling.  If you release the throttle and re-apply throttle before reaching idle you can feel the injector kick in again (and you can see this happening on the JD with the flashing lights).  The chop under this condition is much less severe and is common to most fuel-injected bikes.  The JD (or any add-on fuel controller) will not fix this.  Someone coming off a carbureted bike is more likely to notice this as carburetors don't completely cut off fuel when the throttle is released.

Something to take note about the JD is that the order of the zones on the instructions sheet and on the programming sequence are in a different order than how they are triggered while riding.  For example, when programming or looking at the sheet you see the following zones :1 GREEN, 2 YELLOW, 3 RED, 4 GREEN/BLUE, 5 YELLOW/BLUE, 6 RED/BLUE.  When riding from idle to full throttle they are triggered in the following order (Ignore zone 6 because it's not really a zone):

4 Green/Blue - Idle (setting of 6)
1 Green - Low throttle (setting of 3.5)
5 Yellow/Blue - Low-medium throttle (setting of 3.5)
2 Yellow - Medium throttle (setting of 4)
3 Red - Full throttle  (setting of 4.5)

6 Red/Blue - accelerator pump

So effectively the sequence of fuel adjustments are triggered as follows when riding:   6,  3.5,  3.5,  4,  4.5.  You can see that it's a gradual progression except for the idle which was way too lean from the factory.

Again, note that setting all the zones to 3 makes it run like stock with no tuner.  Higher number increases fuel while lower number decreases fuel

As for the settings I picked, the two I changed from the recommended values was the idle (6) which was recommended by others for the throttle chop and the Yellow/Blue zone to 3.5 instead of 4 because I could feel the transition from the Green zone (3.5) to the Yellow/Blue zone (4).  The setting of 4 is slightly more powerful than the setting of 3.5 and the switchover was noticeable especially because this happens at a relatively low throttle position.  Matching it to the green zone (3.5) the transition was eliminated and if I want more power I can just apply more throttle until I hit the Yellow zone (4).  With these settings everything is seamless and I don't feel any transitions at any throttle positions.

Lastly, I've only had the tuner for a little while and I'm still experimenting with it.  These may not be my final settings.

The instruction sheets have been posted in this thread

I hope all this makes sense and sorry for the long write-up.

 

 

 

  

Thanks for taking time to write this up. This is some great info. This is my first fuel injected bike (coming from a 99 yz250 and a 96 xr250). Ive never messed with a tuner before so any information is helpful.

Edited by xtimesofgrace
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6 hours ago, xtimesofgrace said:

Thanks for taking time to write this up. This is some great info. This is my first fuel injected bike (coming from a 99 yz250 and a 96 xr250). Ive never messed with a tuner before so any information is helpful.

Make sure to seal the back of the connector going to the injector (where the 3 wires go into the connector).  I had one on my previous bike (KLX250) and when I unplugged it the connector on the injector itself was half filled with water.

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5 hours ago, WRfinatic said:

To make things more confusing the JD tuner and Attitude Box are both made by Dobuck performance but use two different graphs to explain the different zones

Screen Shot 2019-05-05 at 12.18.16 AM.png

Screen Shot 2019-05-04 at 11.55.21 PM.png

The second graph is wrong (it's for a different bike).  It does show how these controllers typically work however.  The first 3 zones adjust the amount of fuel and the last 3 switch-points adjust when the zones switch over from one to another, this is how it worked on my KLX250.  In the case for the CRF450L they reassigned the last 3 switch-points to 2 more zones in-between the initial 3 zones, and an accelerator pump feature.  This is why they are out of sequence when programming them, it was an afterthought.  And yes they are all made by Dobeck Performance as OEM and are rebranded, this is an agreement that Dobeck often makes.  Dobeck doesn't even sell one for the CRF450L themselves (yet).

Note: The first graph also has an error in the second row, 5/5 should be 4/5.

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On 5/8/2019 at 12:04 AM, Casey Hanson said:

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I’m in the same boat and was thinking about going to same route. I’m 600mi deep. It’s improved greatly since the start. Setting idle and throttle cables is helpful. Kinda thought about trying a throttle tamer first. emoji2373.png

The throttle tamer won't help because the kick is a hard switchpoint at a specific throttle position.  Once the kick happens the rest of the throttle is fine.  No amount of gradual throttle will prevent it from happening. 

Edited by dp19
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The throttle tamer won't help because the kick is a hard switchpoint at a specific throttle position.  Once the kick happens the rest of the throttle is fine.  No amount of gradual throttle will prevent it from happening. 


Agreed, this thread definitely helped squash the idea that a throttle tamer was the easy fix for an un-modded bike. Looks like it is time to hit up the team at JD! I appreciate everyone taking the time to explain this stuff.
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On 5/8/2019 at 12:04 AM, Casey Hanson said:

+ 1

I’m in the same boat and was thinking about going to same route. I’m 600mi deep. It’s improved greatly since the start. Setting idle and throttle cables is helpful. Kinda thought about trying a throttle tamer first. emoji2373.png

Something else to not overlook is chain slack.  A loose chain will also cause a choppy throttle.

Edited by dp19
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Got my tuner yesterday and installed it today. The choppy throttle is about 98% gone. The bike runs so much better. Probably wont change the exhaust system any time soon and I doubt I will do anything to the air box. I am still getting some slight backfiring on deceleration which, as far as I know, is normal on these types of 4 stroke bikes. (this is the first crf or any of this type of 4 stroke ive owned). Again, I am running stock exhaust, no air box mods, no emissions stuff removed. Just the tuner itself. My settings are 3.5,  4,  4.5,  6,  3.5,  3.

IF i decide to remove the spark arrestor can I just richen up the tuner a bit or will I HAVE to do the air box mod. Someone told me above that I would have to do the air box mod but im just looking for some more input on this..

Also what exactly IS the air box mod? Is it just remove the stock filter and replace it with like a K&N? or is it to change the entire air box out.

Edited by xtimesofgrace
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39 minutes ago, xtimesofgrace said:

Got my tuner yesterday and installed it today. The choppy throttle is about 98% gone. The bike runs so much better. Probably wont change the exhaust system any time soon and I doubt I will do anything to the air box. I am still getting some slight backfiring on deceleration which, as far as I know, is normal on these types of 4 stroke bikes. (this is the first crf or any of this type of 4 stroke ive owned). Again, I am running stock exhaust, no air box mods, no emissions stuff removed. Just the tuner itself. My settings are 3.5,  4,  4.5,  6,  3.5,  3.

IF i decide to remove the spark arrestor can I just richen up the tuner a bit or will I HAVE to do the air box mod. Someone told me above that I would have to do the air box mod but im just looking for some more input on this..

Also what exactly IS the air box mod? Is it just remove the stock filter and replace it with like a K&N? or is it to change the entire air box out.

Awesome!  Proper fueling is a game changer on this bike.  The decel popping is caused by the PAIR valve which injects fresh air into the exhaust to help burn any excess fuel.  It's normal and unless you bypass the PAIR valve the pop will not go away (there's very little benefit in bypassing it).  If you add an exhaust you can just richen up the tuner.  The airbox is actually pretty decent and not a big source of restriction, I would leave it alone.  If you notice that the bike is hard to start after stalling try reducing the Blue/Green zone a bit (from 6 to 5.5).  I've noticed that on mine today.  I've also noticed that it starts quicker in neutral than in gear with the clutch pulled.   

 

 

 

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